Hybird drive VS SSD

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by mrsir2009, Oct 21, 2010.

  1. mrsir2009 macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #1
    Hello everyone,

    I was looking to buy a SSD, but was a bit put off by the price when I saw Hybird drives could be purchased for $100-$150. And I'm wondering if the Hybird drive can still offer the amazing speeds (booting time and app launch) that the SSD offers. I'm using an early 2010 13" MacBook Pro with 4GB of RAM and 2.26 ghz processor.

    Thanks guys!
     
  2. aeboi macrumors 65816

    aeboi

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Location:
    Bay Area
    #2
    It wouldn't wow you like a true ssd but it will be faster than a normal 5400 drive, you will see an increase of speed in the most commonly used apps and a quicker startup.
     
  3. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    #3
    A hybrid drive can't deliver SSD like speeds all the time. It simply isn't possible. The Hybrid drive is nothing but a hard drive with 4GB of cache. The user has no control over it; the drive's firmware fills it up as it sees fit. If your data isn't in the cache, you'll get traditional speeds.

    So you get some speed improvements as the drive learns your habits, but the SSD is nothing but flash. Don't have to worry about head crashes and spinup times with flash. ALL your drive reads and writes will be quick.
     
  4. mrsir2009 thread starter macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #4
    Hmmm, perhaps I should wait until SSD prices drop a bit more and get a full SSD then.
     
  5. tjb1 macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2010
    Location:
    Pennsylvania, USA
    #5
    I have a momentus xt and its very fast without learning and I did the hdapm to disable the head parking/sleeping of the drive. Works great!
     
  6. mrsir2009 thread starter macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #6
    I've had a look at some true SSDs (such as the Samsung one) and I've found that a true SSD will also reuduce noise, use less battery power and be faster with everything. I may as well spend the extra money getting a really great hard drive if I'm buying a new one, ah?

    •Oh, and just to confirm - The 13" late 2009/early 2010 MBP takes a 2.5 inch hard drive. I'm pretty sure it does but I do not want to spend 100s of dollars on the wrong hard drive :rolleyes:
     
  7. tjb1 macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2010
    Location:
    Pennsylvania, USA
    #7
    Yes, all macbooks take the 2.5" drive and if you are really going to buy an SSD make sure you are getting one with the sandforce controller.
     
  8. AnodizedFish macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2010
    #8
    Shouldn't it be 2.4GHz/2.66GHz if it's early 2010's model? :eek:
     
  9. mrsir2009 thread starter macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #9
    Nope, its a 2.26. Must have been a late 2009 then. You see, its a bit hazy when the machine was made because I got it over christmas. I ordered it before and got it after I think. :p
     
  10. lickitysplit macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2010
    #10
    I love my Hybrid drive. And I love that it didn't cost $400 to get a decent size. But I needed a drive that was faster than a 5400rpm, that was also large. In reality it really depends on what you need the drive for. The only thing I use my laptop for is Mac OSX for school and daily computing, and Windows 7 for gaming. So for me a larger drive at 7200rpm was a better option than a smaller drive that has good read/write speeds.

    For people that use it for production purposes, like video and photo editing, will definitely see the advantage of an SSD. But until the prices halve from what they are now, I don't see myself purchasing one.
     
  11. mrsir2009 thread starter macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #11
    Yeah, I've only got $400 now (in NZ dollars) and I'll need about another $100 to get a SSD. I would really like one, but it would clear out all my money and my parents would think 600NZD for a drive is pretty riduclious. They don't understand of course, the huge difference between a HDD and a SSD.
     
  12. mac8867 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Location:
    Saint Augustine, FL
    #12
    Well... you have another choice.
    a) buy a less expensive smaller SSD, say an 80GB or so. $250 USD
    b) Buy an MCE Optibay Upgrade (replace dvd with drive). $100 USD
    c) install OS and apps on SSD, data on current main drive (now in dvd bay)

    Result - performance of an SSD - cost: $400 USD
     
  13. milan03 macrumors 6502

    milan03

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    New York City
    #13
    Hybrid drives are not even in the same league as SSD. Stop fooling yourselves...
     
  14. mac8867 macrumors 6502

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    Apr 5, 2010
    Location:
    Saint Augustine, FL
    #14
    Excellent, insightful input. Empirical and truly convincing.
     
  15. budman1961 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2010
    #15
    Agreed, they do offer exceptional performance gains, without a huge hit to the wallet. I have a 500gig Momentus XT,and I like it, a lot. And I enjoy the $800 remaining in my wallet too.:cool:
     
  16. mrsir2009 thread starter macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #16
    I've heard that SSDs increase battery life? Has anyone thats owned a SSD found that?
     
  17. tjb1 macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2010
    Location:
    Pennsylvania, USA
    #17
    Well since it doesnt have to spin up discs...obviously
     

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