I don't understand...

Discussion in 'iPod' started by hellomoto4, Dec 22, 2008.

  1. hellomoto4 macrumors 6502a

    hellomoto4

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Location:
    Australia
    #1
    I live in Australia.

    Here, the cheapest app to buy (not inc. free apps) is $1.19; the cheapest song to buy (not inc. free songs) is $1.69.

    However, both of these items are priced at $0.99 in the US store.

    I don't understand how Apple can charge an extra $0.50 because it's a song.

    Discuss
     
  2. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

    Tallest Skil

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2006
    Location:
    1 Geostationary Tower Plaza
    #2
    It has to do with your exchange rate and laws.
     
  3. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Location:
    Texas
    #3
    Conversion rates ... Australian taxes Apple pays (then passes on to you) ... Australian record companies demand it ... They feel like charging more in Australia?
     
  4. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #4
    It also has everything to do with what Apple was able to negotiate with the Australian arms of record companies. As Apple has been the major proponent of uniform pricing of digital sales, I would point the finger at the record labels first. It's a digital copy of a music recording -- it doesn't have any real, fundamental, logical value. Or rather, that value is extremely low and represents a tiny fraction of its actual fair market value.

    What is the price range for a CD album in an Australian CD store?
     
  5. Purpdust macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2008
  6. Ivan P macrumors 68030

    Ivan P

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Location:
    Home
    #6
    They tend to be an average of around $30, some stores sell them for around $20 (or if they're really crappy/bad sellers, $10/$15). In comparison, $16.99 for an album on iTunes is a rather good deal.

    That'd be difficult as to buy anything you'd need a billing address inside the US, a US credit card or, at the very least, a US iTunes gift card (the gift cards in Australia only work in the Australian iTunes Store, and I imagine the same restrictions apply in other regions too).
     
  7. themoonisdown09 macrumors 601

    themoonisdown09

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    #7
    That's expensive. I love buying cds when they first come out for $7.99 at Target. Of course, it's been a couple years since I bought a cd there.
     
  8. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #8
    Right... I think that also encapsulates the difference. Single disc CD albums in the US cost between $13-19, outside of the extreme sales like exampled above, with the lower prices at stores like Walmart and Target and the higher prices at stores that are more media oriented (Best Buy, sometimes, Borders, Barnes & Nobles). So ...

    If we pay $9.99 for an online album that would cost $13-19 in the store, I think that's actually fairly comparable to the cost difference between your physical media and your iTunes purchases.

    Again, this is all contract law and contract negotiations. There is no fixed pricing -- there's only what Apple can get the record labels in AUS to agree with....
     
  9. Purpdust macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2008
    #9
    If you do decide to set up a USA account, there are ways to buy the Gift cars (EBay) and make sure you pick a state for your address without sales tax:cool: From what I understand you only need a Valid Zip Code with a Valid City. the rest can be fake.
     
  10. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #10
    Please be aware that if you're not a US resident, and you use methods to controvert the Apple system in order to establish yourself as one, so that you can buy music from the US Apple Store, you still don't have any legal rights to the software, as it is being licensed by a US Entity to a US resident, which you are not. So if you do this, you really don't legally have any more rights to the music than you would have were you to pirate it.
     

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