i finally did it!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by dxpx, Jun 19, 2008.

  1. dxpx macrumors member

    dxpx

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Location:
    the 405, OK
    #1
    yesterday, i bought my first DSLR! she's a nikon D60 - and i absolutely love it. granted - ive got a lot to learn, but the MR forums have always provided great help!


    baring that in mind - any tips for a first time user?
     
  2. Everythingisnt macrumors 6502a

    Everythingisnt

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver
    #2
    I'll share something I learned after buying a dslr - you must always read the manual no matter how boring it seems. Beyond that, keep on using it until it feels like a part of you and you can operate it without the slightest hesitation. :)
     
  3. valdore macrumors 65816

    valdore

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Location:
    Kansas City, Missouri. USA
    #3
    Although it only does good to read the manual if there's a certain something you're looking for... read it when the need arises. I think the same can be said for school and life too.
     
  4. Phrasikleia macrumors 601

    Phrasikleia

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2008
    Location:
    Over there------->
    #4
    Reading the manual may cause you to discover something you didn't know about the camera, something that you would never have gone looking for.
     
  5. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    Location:
    Wherever I hang my hat...
    #5
    Shoot loads and loads of pictures... and begin to learn what 'works' and what doesn't... :)
     
  6. ButtUglyJeff macrumors 6502a

    ButtUglyJeff

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2008
    Location:
    New York. The state, not the toilet.
    #6
    "Nikon D60 for Dummies", at least I assume there's that title in the series. There are almost always books deticated to a specific Nikon model. They might be a bit more of a fun read then just the manual, with photo's for examples.

    Also, I like to search Flickr for images that were taken with the same camera I use and check out the settings for the photos I like. These new fangled camera store the data of the camera settings rignt within the file of the image. And this info ends up on Flickr too.

    But remember, there's no film to waste, so shoot shoot shoot..............
     
  7. Hmac macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    May 30, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    #7
    Sign up over at DP Review. There is a D60-specific forum over there with a wealth of information.
     
  8. hank-b macrumors member

    hank-b

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    #8
    You'll probably want to buy a lens next :)
     
  9. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #9
    Reading the manual only when the need arises will only lead to a person never using the camera the the fullest. Even a seasoned photographer who buys a brand new camera should at least browse through the manual looking at all of the new features and how they work.

    Read the manual and if that is too dry pick up a D60 book and read it. I can't see how it'd be something you'd regret.
     
  10. Soma 115 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
    Location:
    the Chi
    #10
    Couldn't agree more. I learned so much more after reading the manual, it was crazy
     
  11. Hmac macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    May 30, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    #11
    The Nikon manuals tend to get pretty arcane. And in most cases they only explain what a control does, not why, or how you might use it optimally. There are a few user guides available or soon to be available that are much better. I am a big fan of Thom Hogan's guides and if I were you I'd get that when it becomes available.

    Look at
    http://www.nikonians.org/forums/dcb...&forum=152&topic_id=29465&mesg_id=29465&page=
     
  12. Piercey macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2008
    #12
    Shoot in Manual mode and really learn about the in's and outs of photography.
     
  13. dxpx thread starter macrumors member

    dxpx

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Location:
    the 405, OK
    #13
    wow! thanx everyone for the feedback thus far! im definitely making my way through the manual - especially after last night. i was trying to shoot an oaktree only lit by a outdoor lantern. now, i know this is possible with a bit of inevitable "noise" - but christ, i wasn't coming close. i was trying my best to be clever with what little knowledge i have of sensitivity, aperature, and shutter-speed - but to no avail!

    needless to say, back to studying i go!
     
  14. PeteB macrumors 6502a

    PeteB

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    #14
    Read "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson.

    It'll give you a great foundation for photography.
     
  15. Adrien Baker macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Location:
    Bakersfield, Ca.
    #15
    That book is a great choice and will explain everything clearly.

    The many suggestions for reading the manual are good also, but like others have mentioned it would be good to find a third party manual about the camera that will go a little more in-depth on how and why things work the way they do.

    Adrien
     
  16. jhamerphoto macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2007
    #16
    I lol'd.
     
  17. CrackedButter macrumors 68040

    CrackedButter

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2003
    Location:
    51st State of America
    #17
    1. Buy a light meter and use your camera on manual.
    2. When you have what you think is a great photo, don't write your name on it.
     
  18. seenew macrumors 68000

    seenew

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2005
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    #18
    hahaha!
     
  19. furious macrumors 65816

    furious

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2006
    Location:
    Australia
    #19
    Why not?
     
  20. M@lew macrumors 68000

    M@lew

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #20
    I don't really think they need a handheld light meter just yet, especially when they're very new to photography.
     
  21. CrackedButter macrumors 68040

    CrackedButter

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2003
    Location:
    51st State of America
    #21
    Well I wonder why people do it in the first place, what is the need with signing your own work? It's a pointless process people put themselves through. People know its from you and I think it distracts, yeah okay there is an argument for it to be a watermark but why put it on the edge, I can crop it right out if I felt the need. Go to www.viiphoto.com and look at the examples there of a decent watermark if you have to write on your photo.

    It is simply a carry over from when painters would sign their work. I say painters because I've never seen a professional photographer (whether it be an artistic photographer or a photojournalist) sign their work because you know its their photography by the work defining them not the other way around.

    So as a suggestion to the beginner, its best to not even begin to do it. Plus anybody reading this might think otherwise as well, the less people do it the better in my opinion. It smells of camera club as well.

    I think once that person realises how a picture exposes properly without a camera involved, their thinking greatly differs, sometimes I've fallen into the trap of taking a picture and not being aware of the exposure. They can seperate the parts of what makes a good exposure and learn to bring them back together again. A good time to do it is when the brain is softening up to how a DSLR works.
     
  22. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #22
    The camera already has a built-in light meter, no need to buy one to go to manual mode.
     
  23. Everythingisnt macrumors 6502a

    Everythingisnt

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver
    #23
    Exactly. An external light meter is usually superfluous...
     
  24. CrackedButter macrumors 68040

    CrackedButter

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2003
    Location:
    51st State of America
    #24
    I'm aware of what a camera already has built in, that wasn't the point I was trying to make now was it? If the thread starter is asking for tips then I would like to open him up to the world of incidence light and reflected light and understand the difference in order to have a good exposure.

    But since no camera has a incidence light meter built in I think its useful to go and buy one switch the camera to manual and have some fun.
     
  25. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #25
    Expodisc, can lid, coffee cup- there are lots of ways to get an incident reading from a built-in reflected meter. For example:

    http://photo.net/leica-rangefinders-forum/0063U8
     

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