I have arthritis? Really??

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Abstract, Mar 26, 2008.

  1. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #1
    I just found out today that I may have arthritis. I used to jog a lot, and my knee hurt after I ran. At first I thought it was my running shoes, but it wasn't. I bought a new pair of awesome Brooks just to make sure, and it didn't take care of the problem. Getting new shoes used to help with shin splints, but my new running shoes, which fit perfectly, didn't do anything.

    Anyway, I stopped running last June (like 9 months ago), and started swimming. Actually, I'm teaching myself. :eek: However, my knee still hurts sometimes, and I don't know why. It will definitely hurt if I walk uphill or up a bunch of stairs, but it will occasionally start hurting when I've done nothing but post on MR all day. :eek:

    I thought I'd need an X-ray or MRI or something, but the doctor simply suggested that I may suffer from a bit of arthritis. He told me not to run anymore, and don't get back into it. I told him my knee even tingles after I swim. He said swimming and biking should be OK. Why do I get that weird sensation in my right knee, then? :confused: Does this sound like arthritis, or should I get a scan? He gave me a "prescription" for a scan if I want to get one, and another for a physiotherapist.

    He also told me to take glucosammine sulfate or something, which is some sort of supplement. :( I have to take it every day.

    Anyway, it sucks. I loved running, but I also want to walk and play with my grandchildren when I'm 65, so I guess I should be careful. :rolleyes:
     
  2. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

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    #2
    The physiotherapist can look at the mechanics of your stride and posture.

    Commonly, if your foot position is not right, it causes extra stress on the knee.

    This cannot be corrected with new shoes, but can be with custom made orthotics that put your foot back into the correct position for proper knee mechanics (which also reduces wear and tear on hips and backs)

    If needed, yout physio will give you a referral to a orthotics specialist who will make a 3-D model of your foot and then make inserts for your shoes that do the trick. This is covered by many health plans.

    The physio may also give you specific exercises to strengthen the muscles supporting the knee.

    Glucosamine Sulfate, Chondritin and MSM are all supplements that aid in joint problems they are commonly used in combination. Also Omega 3 fish oil capsules are good to add.

    The other big thing to avoid is inflammation -- Aspirin and other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) are the typical treatment for inflammatory conditions like arthritis, but there are significant issues with gastrointestinal, kidney and heart health with long term use of many NSAIDs - witness Vioxx being pulled from the market.

    You can keep inflammation down in general with some diet changes. Increase the amount of antioxidants you get, whether by eating more deeply coloured veggies and'or taking supplements. Reduce or eliminate wheat and gluten products, which are inflammatory particularly in susceptible people. Increase Omega-3 oils (eat more cold water fish) and less fatty and red meats. Certain foods such as turmeric, cayenne, ginger are anti-inflammatory.

    And certainly- ice your knees if they are hot and painful.
     
  3. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #3
    Get the scan and see the physical therapist. It's always good to get a second opinion.
     
  4. Abstract thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    Oh man, I'm very flat-footed! I used to use orthotics, but since I'm not actually covered by my parents' health insurance anymore, I haven't bothered with getting them. Actually, even when I had them, I never really bothered using them. When I was covered by my parents insurance, I didn't bother to get them. That may be why I have arthritis, although I always assumed that I'd have back problems if I didn't use them, not knee problems.

    I just bought my Brooks because they were made for flat-footed people. That doesn't cover my everyday use, though. Maybe I should stop wearing flip flops/thongs every day. :eek: Or I should wear my Birkenstocks and Brooks runners more often. I usually wear my running shoes strictly for running, not casually, but since I won't be running ever again..... :(
     
  5. Abstract thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    Yeah, I'm thinking about it, particularly the physiotherapist. The X-ray may not even show my arthritis. It's also quite expensive for me to just go out and get. I'll check to see if it's covered by my overseas student health insurance.
     
  6. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

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    #6
    You gotta wear the orthotics all day, every day.

    Otherwise, it's like having a car with bad wheel alignment -- you can't just say "I'll just turn a little harder when I need to turn right." -- it'll mess up your tires unless you apply the correction permanently.
     
  7. Abstract thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    Crap. Those are like $400 CDN, no? I'll look into it. Do you think I can just ask my parents to order a pair for me? I probably still need the same "correction" I needed 4 years ago, right? The last place did a fantastic job, so I'm just asking.
     
  8. mcarnes macrumors 68000

    mcarnes

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    #8
    Just call your local imaging center (Epic, etc.) and ask them what the Medicare rate is for a 2-view (AP, Lat) for bilateral knee. By law they have to give you that rate if you pay cash. I bet it would be about $40.

    I try not to give out advice on the net, but you most certainly should not have to give up running. What a load of crap. You might have to take some time off if it is a repetitive use injury, but to advise someone to not be active is just wrong. That is an extreme last resort.

    Edit: Assuming you're in U.S.
     
  9. Abstract thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    I'm not in the US. Anyway, I guess I don't mind. I'd rather have a decent right knee by the time I'm 70.


    Anyway, I believe him about the running because I stopped running 9 months ago, and my knee still hurts. I mean, if I kept running over the past 9 months, surely my knee would be in worse shape. I guess if I find out exactly what I should be doing, running may not be a problem. I'm not sure, though. My Brooks were designed for people with flat-feet, and has a bit more cushioning than the typical running shoe. As a runner, I can even feel that it's true. I can't verify that it's great for flat feet, though.

    I don't mind taking up other sports that require some running, but no jogging from now on.
     
  10. TheQuestion macrumors regular

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    #10
    I'm sorry, maybe you said in your OP, but can't find it...Rheumatoid (sp?) or Osteo?
     
  11. Abstract thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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  12. lofight macrumors 68000

    lofight

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    #12
    I'm not sure about biking, but swimming is a very good sport without having pain. Because you aren't pressing alot with your knee, only against water, and you keep moving, but on the counterside, it's a little boring (IMO).
     
  13. alFR macrumors 68020

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    Get a scan (preferably) or x-rays and see a physio. You might have a ligament tear, a meniscal tear etc. etc. and there's no way to know that without some sort of imaging. No offense to any GP posters, but most GPs know very little about sports injuries and often just advise rest when that's not necessarily the best thing.
     
  14. Abstract thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    Gotcha. That's what I'm thinking as well.

    And like you, I don't mean to offend any GPs out there, but they probably don't deal with any really strange cases on a regular basis. Any training for this sort of thing is probably forgotten, or best left to a professional who deals with this type of thing all the time. I'm sure the system is designed this way on purpose for this very reason. That's probably why they receive training for a LOT of different types of disease and injury, but are likely required, or strongly suggested, to send patients to a specialist or hospital where more advanced, thorough, and rigourous testing can be done.
     
  15. Cheffy Dave macrumors 68020

    Cheffy Dave

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    #15
    All excellent advice,might I add, get another doctor, one that will look into why you have pain,all the time,maybe simple surgery:eek:
     
  16. juanm macrumors 65816

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    Swimming is OK, as long as you know how to do it properly. Make sure you learn how to use your legs underwater. Until then, go easy on your legs (according to my experience, breaststroke and crwaling can injure your legs if done improperly)
     

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