I need help finding an mp3 splitter

Discussion in 'macOS' started by gerbilman204, Jul 7, 2008.

  1. gerbilman204 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2008
    #1
    I'm looking for an mp3 splitter that can split the instruments of the song from the voice so basically the splitter would cut the voice away.

    Macbook Pro 15 inch, 2.4 GH.
     
  2. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #2
    You are basically asking for the impossible. They are not stored separately in the file: the overall frequency of the sound is sampled thousands of time a second with all sounds contributing. You might be able to roughly reduce the vocals by selective frequency removal but this would have to be judged on a song-by-song basis.
     
  3. bartelby macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    #3
    If you have a stereo source you can invert one of the channels. As long as the vocals are dead center in the mix they'll be canceled out. So will anything else cecntered in the mix.
     
  4. kolax macrumors G3

    kolax

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    #4
    Not possible - you can only do this with a MIDI file, since it contains the individual instrument instructions.
     
  5. teleromeo macrumors 65816

    teleromeo

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    #5
    have a look at iWow from srs-labs. It's a plugin for iTunes that enhances the sound but with certain settings you can achieve a karaoke-like sound.
     
  6. dXTC macrumors 68020

    dXTC

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    Up, up in my studio, studio
    #6
    Two other things that are very often centered: Kickdrum and Bassline. As both are low frequency, and low-frequency sounds are non-directional by their very nature, most mixing engineers put them dead center so that they come out both sides of the mix equally. So, forget about using this trick on your favorite dance/club tracks.

    On top of that, most professionally-recorded vocals nowadays have stereo reverb and delay effects that would still be heard after inversion, so the vocals would still be there.

    This question has been asked many times in many different ways on this and other forums, and the answer is the same: Vocals (or other individual instruments) cannot be reliably, consistently removed from a fully mixed and mastered music recording. They may be diminished, but not fully removed.

    Your best bet is to dig through your local music store's karaoke CD bins... or somehow become really good friends with the engineers so that they give you a multitrack audio file for you to remix. (Like producers and artists are going to allow that to happen on a regular basis-- they have enough problems keeping music projects from getting leaked onto P2P before release date as it is.)

    Correct, but that won't help the OP, who I am guessing would like a way to do "MP3 karaoke". MIDI only contains note information, not sound.
     
  7. amok-san macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2008
    #7
    Any of you guys heard about "Direct Note Access" which will debut in the next version of Celemony´s Melodyne?
    With that you can identify and edit individual notes within polyphonic audio material.
    I think it´s the next step to the dream of manipulating single instruments in a fully mixed recording.
     
  8. Julien macrumors G3

    Julien

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #8
    Take a spoon full of Nestle's Quick and stir into a glass of milk. Now remove the Nestle's Quick from the milk. That is what you are asking for. You can partially accomplish this at best with expensive and hard to use technologies, but is it practical? NO
     
  9. kolax macrumors G3

    kolax

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    #9
    Export a tablature to a MIDI file (say from GarageBand) and it will contain the data to make the instruments sound unique. Things such as pitch, vibrato etc are also included in a MIDI file.

    If a MIDI file only contained note information, then it would be a score wouldn't it?
     
  10. dXTC macrumors 68020

    dXTC

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    Oct 30, 2006
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    #10
    I stand slightly corrected. MIDI does contain program change and controller information such as pitch bend and modulation in addition to notes, and occasionally short samples via SysEx to certain older samplers.

    However, MIDI has little say on how the sound generators/synths actually sound when they receive the note data; that is dependent on the sound modules/synths themselves. That's why a MIDI file played on a Mac will sound quite different from the same MIDI file played on, say, a Korg Triton, which in itself will sound different from a Roland XP-50-- each synth has its own set of waveforms. Without having the actual synths and effects processors that the producers/artists used, a person cannot accurately recreate the finished product.

    In this sense, MIDI is more or less a "score" as you describe.

    And since standard MIDI files cannot contain individual audio tracks, instruments like distorted guitar solos and vocal tracks are, for the most part, out of the question.
     
  11. DaveF macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2007
    Location:
    NoVA
    #11
    This should be trivial. People have been doing this for decades with analog music. 20 years ago a high school friend used a homebrew analog inverter built from Radio Shack parts to produce tapes of popular songs with the vocals removed.

    The key was that the vocals were in phase across Left and Right channels (essentially mono) but the instruments were phase inverted for stereo separation. Subtracting the signal from itself removed most of the vocals and left the instrumentation largely untouched.

    And, a five second search on Google for stereo music vocal remove gives hits on the right track. It looks like you want to search for Karaoke software.
     
  12. dXTC macrumors 68020

    dXTC

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Up, up in my studio, studio
    #12
    The trick you're speaking of can still be done in the digital realm; I've done it before myself. Most digital audio workstation software will allow you to invert a waveform-- Sound Studio, Logic Studio, ProTools, etc.

    The only problem is, music production styles have changed considerably over the years, and we can no longer count on the vocals being "panned dead center". Nowadays, a "lead vocal" track often consists of two very similar takes by the vocalist, one set slightly left of center, the other slightly right; it's close enough to fool our ears, but it ruins using the invert phase trick. Other recording studios will record the vocal using a true stereo mic.

    The increased use of stereo vocal effects processors (reverb, delay, etc.) complicates matters even further.
     

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