i need help on what computer classes to take

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by r21hugo, Dec 7, 2007.

  1. r21hugo macrumors member

    r21hugo

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2007
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #1
    hi i am 19 years old and want to get into programming. So i just want to ask for any suggestions on classes i should take at my community college... and or which classes to start with.
     
  2. ChrisBrightwell macrumors 68020

    ChrisBrightwell

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2004
    Location:
    Huntsville, AL
    #2
    I'm sure there's a freshman-level "Introduction to Programming" course, probably in C or Java. Take that. :p
     
  3. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #3

    Take whatever you can transfer to a four year school. Normally there is little choice because there is a series of classes there one follows the next.

    One thing about programming is that you also need to know something else. For example if you are going to write program that automate banking it would be real good to know a little about banking. So pick a subject area in business, science, math, engineering, medicine or whatever. If you ever land a job programming it will be in the context of a larger business. At the community collage level you do not have to specialize but should at least know it you are leaning to business or engineering. Take some of those classes.
     
  4. benlee macrumors 65816

    benlee

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2007
    #4
    I started off as a computer science major in undergrad and took one class in C++ (none of which I remember). I was pretty good at it (think I got an A). But when it came time to take the next class I didn't want to and ended up switching my major. I took AP courses in high school dealing with programming and I thought it was much more fun and interesting. However, the quality of the teacher is going to have an effect on the class.(just as with any class).

    Anyways, the reason I changed was because I was not interested in theory and I just wanted to do cool things with the computer and didn't have the patience to wait. I suggest taking other classes dealing with computers if available to hold you over.

    Also, If you really like programming try to learn ahead of the class in whatever language you are learning. Not only will you get a great grade but you will probably learn things twice as fast teaching yourself than a professor trying to teach you along with 20 other students.

    Sorry for the rant but just things I learned as a freshman. Good luck
     
  5. stevento macrumors 6502

    stevento

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2006
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #5
    you might want to start with the 101, which is like intro to computer and html and java script and web. or you skip that gobledigook and jump straight into the programming 101 class. which is intro to java or C. i did java, (its muy game)then you do Data Structures, then you do hard ware courses. which is much much fun.
    talk to and advisor
     
  6. eastcoastsurfer macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    #6
    My only problem with this approach is that if you really want to make software development your career, theory is what you need and probably the only thing you'll use (most likely without even knowing it) when you leave college. Remember, the language you end up solving problems in should generally be irrelevant (and in my experience should be chosen based on the problem). Old languages will die away and new languages will come out. If you know the underlying theory, you'll see that new languages are just different abstractions on a common base concept.

    I am just remembering when I was in undergrad learning theory and thinking it was useless. By the end of my undergrad (and now during my masters) each class used whatever language the teacher felt like using. You were expected to pick it up on your own outside of class to get the projects done. They could do this because you had been taught the theory that in turn made picking up new languages fairly trivial.
     

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