I played WipeOut HD in 3D today!

Discussion in 'Console Games' started by Taustin Powers, Sep 5, 2009.

  1. Taustin Powers macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2005
    #1
    At the IFA in Berlin, Sony put on a pretty impressive show.

    I have to say, their 3D tv technology is really something to keep an eye on (prototype status as of now). Since my eyes are a little jacked up (from birth), I normally can't see any of those 3D things (red/green stuff, magic eye etc.), cause my brain can't combine the two pictures of my eyes into one properly. But this stuff EVEN WORKED FOR ME! This made me really happy, cause I approached it thinking "oh great, another new 3D technology that I can't see..."

    I'm not sure how the technology works. When I asked one of the clowns on the show room, he said "well, uh, the tv puts out a special kind of picture, and the glasses make it 3D". Wow, no kidding, thanks dude! :rolleyes:

    Without the glasses, it looks like the picture is doubled and overlayed maybe half an inch apart. From what I gathered, the TV has to do 200Hz, so maybe it's alternating the two "channels", 100Hz each? Not sure if that would make sense. The glasses kinda look like sunglasses, they just darken the rest of your surroundings. And there is active technology in the glasses too - you had to point them at a sensor above the tv to get them out of standby mode. (conserves batteries that way)

    They had a demo video running of a bunch of games - LBP, Killzone2, some Baseball game, and Motorstorm. All looked great through the glasses. WipePut was the only playable one, and it really made me want that TV! :D

    Supposedly the goal is for the TV to be able to turn every signal you feed it into a 3D picture down the line. Not sure if that is even possible though - how would it know what parts of the picture to put in the front/back, unless it's embedded in the signal somehow? But I am really not tech-savvy enough to have an opinion on this... :) I guess we will see.
     
  2. JackAxe macrumors 68000

    JackAxe

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2004
    Location:
    In a cup of orange juice.
    #2
    Looks to be a good tech. I've tried the other 3D tech from nVidia, which my TV and GPU support, and surprisingly it didn't give me a massive headache like earlier 3D tech, but I wasn't blown away by it like others have been.

    Too me, everything looked like layered cutouts on a 3D plane.
     
  3. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2002
    Location:
    The Bamboo Forest
    #3
  4. Vster macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2005
    Location:
    Celina, TX
  5. Taustin Powers thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2005
    #5
    Read up on it a little - it's actually a "shuttering" technique.

    The "left" and "right" pictures are taking turns, each at 100 Hz. The glasses "shut" the eyes likewise, so you really always only see with one eye at a time, just in very short intervals.

    That would explain why it works for me, and polarized solutions don't. I can't really see with both eyes at the same time, always focused on one - with this, I don't have to! My brain can't combine the two pictures my eyes are seeing, and here it is fed one at a time. Pretty awesome.
     
  6. MRU macrumors demi-god

    MRU

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Ireland
    #6
    As soon as they can do 3D TV without the need for any form of glasses - it will remain a novelty IMHO.

    Philip's were meant to be demonstrating 3DTV which works without glasses at some point, so there's hope.
     
  7. Taustin Powers thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2005
    #7
    ^ I saw an approach like that at last year's IFA, though I forgot which manufacturer it was. Basically, the tv screen was not smooth but had "serrated" or "furrowed" (looking up words in the dictionary here...) surface.

    Like: ^^^^^^^^^^^ instead of --------------------


    So if you are looking straight at it, your left eye should see a different picture than your right eye. It looked really awkward and of course didn't work if you moved to the side a little. Not sure if that approach is still being pursued...


    I found an article about Sony's technology which nicely summed it up in a compact sentence: "Sony's new TV alternates the image for the left and right eye, while special glasses open and shut in sync with the image on the screen, giving the impression of depth." What I am wondering is whether this will induce a strain on the eyes/brain or headaches in the long run...?
     
  8. MRU macrumors demi-god

    MRU

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Ireland
    #8
    Yeah sounds like a lawsuit waiting to happen.....
     

Share This Page