I want to disable ALL system password prompts

Discussion in 'macOS' started by nonunderling, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. nonunderling macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2007
    #1
    Hi there,

    I am sure this is an easy fix but I have searched high and low and can't find this out anywhere.

    My father has an iMac with 3 user accounts active. None of these accounts are password-protected. However, when installing a new app (or doing various other things on the computer) it prompts me for a password. Now, since there are no active user passwords, I can simply click "OK" and move on.. But the fact that it prompts me in the first place is bothersome.

    SO..
    I want to be able to install apps and run maintenance scripts and NEVER be prompted for a password of any kind. Is this possible?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    It's not possible and very inadvisable, as that is a security feature, to prevent malware from installing without your knowledge or permission. You should use the prompt as an opportunity to stop and think about what you're installing or permitting.
     
  3. Alameda macrumors 6502a

    Alameda

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2012
    #3
    Maybe you could run as root user, but that's a really bad idea. Maybe better to switch to root only for your software updates.
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
    It is not required to log in as root to run software updates. The average user will have little or no reason to ever log in as root.
     
  5. Alameda macrumors 6502a

    Alameda

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2012
    #5
    He's trying to eliminate the password prompts when remotely installing software.
     
  6. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #6
    It would be interesting to know how you came to that conclusion, since the OP said nothing about remote access.
     
  7. nonunderling thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2007
    #7
    No this has nothing to do with remote access.

    GGJstudios- while I appreciate your advice to carefully consider what I'm installing while being prompted for a password, it's not really to the point of my question. I am quite aware of what I'm installing and confident in its source. I suppose, like you say, what I want to do simply isn't possible out of consideration for proper security. It does tick me off a bit though!

    Thanks for the replies.
     
  8. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #8
    While I have no doubt you can make wise choices as to what to install, the password prompt prevents malware from automatically installing with elevated privileges without your knowledge. So it's not just you having to respond with a password to grant privileges; it's any software that may attempt to install itself being blocked from those privileges by that prompt.
     
  9. Alameda macrumors 6502a

    Alameda

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2012
    #9
    Sorry, I just figured that when he said he was running maintenance scripts on somebody else's machine, he'd do it remotely.

    He could remotely login as root, do his dirty work, and leave without a prompt, if that's what he really wants.
     
  10. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #10
    The Mac OS X maintenance scripts run automatically, without the need for user intervention. Also, you don't need to log in as root to run scripts, install or delete apps, or do most other things on a Mac.
     
  11. Alameda macrumors 6502a

    Alameda

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2012
    #11
    I'm not trying to argue with you. I don't even disagree with you. I told him it wasn't a good idea, but that it could work. I don't know what scripts he wants to run. I'm just trying to be helpful.
     
  12. stchman macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #12
    Unix and Linux accounts use password prompts for security reasons. This is the reason that you don't really need anti-virus on a Unix like system as you have to authorize any system changes.

    "Bothersome", I guess getting a credit card number stolen and having someone else charge to your card is FAR more bothersome than having ot enter your password to do administrative tasks.
     

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