i was thinking to get the new imac but WTH!?!

Discussion in 'iMac' started by bo-waleed, May 9, 2011.

  1. bo-waleed macrumors 6502

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  2. simsaladimbamba

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    #2
    And?
    It is a rumour, and a bad one nonetheless.
    And when Apple released Intel Macs, the PPC Macs were still working, as they don't stop working just because a new architecture is used.

    CPUs using ARM aren't as strong as Intels offerings right now (besides Atom), especially in the desktop sector.
     
  3. bo-waleed thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #3

    the minimum requirement for lion is core 2 due,what if OS XI only require ARM cpu ??

    also many apps now doesn't work for ppc macs.
     
  4. dal20402 macrumors 6502

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    #4
    ... nearly 5 years after the *last* PPC Mac was sold.

    This switch, if it's going to happen (and I think it's B.S.), will be in 2013. Your iMac should be good until 2018. That's long enough.
     
  5. simsaladimbamba

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    #5
    Core 2 Duo CPUs have been introduced in late 2006 into Macs, thus Lion is installable on almost five year old machines.
    And if Apple uses ARM for their Macs and OS XI requires it, then it will have a reason, due to functionality.
    Anyway, OS XI is still more than five years off, as SJ said himself, that OS X will be with us for two decades, and OS X was released in 1999/2000.
    And if you really give that much credit to such a rumour and will hold off purchasing an iMac, you may not understand ARM that much. It is a low power architecture for mobile devices (something the iMac is not meant to be), and it is really slow compared to iX CPUs. Apple will stay a while with Intel, maybe AMD (which seems more likely to me than ARM), thus you will have a good machine for the next five years.

    If you need your Mac now, buy now, you can always sell it when ARM is around the corner (2015 or 2020 maybe, if even).
     
  6. QCassidy352 macrumors G3

    QCassidy352

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    #6
    Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3_3 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8J2 Safari/6533.18.5)

    Whether or not apple switches to ARM (and I don't believe it for a second), you're not necessarily going to be able to run new OS updates on a 5-7 year old computer. Apple was selling core duo intel macs in 2006 (and I think into 2007) that lion won't support. So that's less than 5-7 years without an architecture change.

    5-7 years is a long time to keep a computer if you always want the newest OS. I don't think this ARM rumor changes anything.
     
  7. mwayne85 macrumors regular

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    #7
    The majority of people here believe the rumor to be not true, and a very bad idea. Don't let it deter you from getting an iMac.
     
  8. Badger^2 macrumors 68000

    Badger^2

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  9. theSeb macrumors 604

    theSeb

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    #9
  10. turbobass macrumors 6502

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    #10
    I think your problem is wanting to buy and keep a computer for more than 4 years. Even if you want to debate the contemporary relevance of Moore's law that's just fundamentally not understanding the economics of computing power.

    NO OFFENSE MEANT, I am the same way in what I would *like* but just is not a practical expectation.
     
  11. TheUndertow macrumors 6502

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    #11
    I can't think I've ever owned a laptop or computer that's lasted 2 years, let alone that I'd actually still want in 3 years.

    Tech moves too fast - 5-7 years...computers age by "dog years".

    I'd rather they base their decision on a architecture change for a good reason and not because you want to keep a computer for 5-7 years.
     
  12. turbobass, May 9, 2011
    Last edited: May 9, 2011

    turbobass macrumors 6502

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    #12
    Yep plus no matter what they say, esp. w/HDDs they get frail and break more easily after time
     
  13. reckless2k2 macrumors 6502a

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    #13
    No offense to TheUndertow and turbobass but I generally have computers for 5 years. I do my best to future proof them as much as possible but the average user can get by for a number of years with a computer.

    I just packed up an Athlon 64 X2 from 2005 and not because anything was wrong with it. It was just it's time when it came to some of the functions I required. Actually, the newer versions of iTunes were really taxing it. I just jumped to the new iMac i5 with Thunderbolt and the added bonus of super fast video encoding is a joy compared to the old dog.

    Most users are casually surfing and checking email. A 5 year lifecycle is not unreasonable.
     
  14. turbobass macrumors 6502

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    #14
    If a computer is taxed by running iTunes then it probably should have been upgraded long ago if you were actually trying to do anything even a little bit taxing (more than iTunes) with it.

    As per the logic that "if you're just checking email, etc." -- does that mean that everyone who just checks email should purchase a top of the line machine in order to try and outlast the development cycle for 6 years? If all they are doing is checking email, etc. you're probably better off with a low-end model that has a minimum outlay and be comfortable with it getting obsolete ... you do realize that you pay a premium for the fastest hardware at the outset?
     
  15. MrWillie macrumors 65816

    MrWillie

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    #15
    My mother still uses her G5 iMAc. It's her only computer.

    As far as ARM processors go, look at what tomorrow's ARM will be like, not today's. I see OsXI running on both ARM and "truck" CPUs, as will Windows 8. Laptops as we know them will be gone. I hope to have an iPad with a detachable keyboard, that runs the same OS as my truck computer. Yes the past was a failure, but an OS can be designed from the ground up to work on a tablet, and scale up to a desktop. Windows is headed in this direction with Windows 8, I don't know why anyone was surprised at this announcement. I do think the part about a total switch to ARM was a pile of horse manure. Seriously, do we really know what Intel will have on the drawing boards/market in 3-5 years ?

    Get the new iMac, and enjoy it.
     
  16. TheUndertow macrumors 6502

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    #16
    No offense taken...the last few have been high end gaming laptops and they've met their thermal maker prematurely.

    I tend to cycle through faster and thankfully I've been able to splurge roughly every 3 years.
     
  17. wal9000 macrumors member

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    #17
    Really? I have a Late 2006 MBP (2.33 GHz Core 2 Duo) and it works perfectly fine. Doesn't even feel slow. It had some under warranty part failures, and I upgraded the hard drive myself. Any part failures would still be worth repairing, since it should still sell for more than that cost of any individual part. And that's for a computer that will be 5 years old in a couple of months.

    This sounds more like an excessive consumerism "I like shiny things" problem than a computer problem.
     
  18. thedarkhorse macrumors 6502a

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    #18
    Apparently in 2013 ARM will have a 2.5ghz quad core that will perform on par with 3+ year old core 2 duos... I wouldn't worry about the imac switching anytime soon.
     
  19. kevin2223 macrumors member

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    #19
    I can't see Apple moving to ARM within the next 3 years, especially if Intel continues to keep producing better-performing processors at the same wattage and roughly the same price.

    Even on the MacBook and MacBook Air, it would be a stretch to say that these chips will be more powerful than the current Core 2 Duos/Core 'i' chips. However, if Apple brings iOS to the basic MacBook/Air, there could be a possibility. But, even this doesn't make a whole lot of sense, it could a few years from now, though.
     
  20. MrWillie macrumors 65816

    MrWillie

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    #20
    It's not iOS nor is it the MacBook/Air. It's a iOS/OSX hybrid and an Air/iPad hybrid. Windows is doing that with Win8 (or at least trying like hell to). This will create a 'real' Windows tablet/laptop that will kill traditional laptops. I am sure somewhere deep down in the basement at Apple's headquarters there is a crackpot team working on this. Apple's tablet laptop hybrid. Bootcamps or VM Win8. Now instead of carrying a Windows laptop and an iPad (the iPad is so much easier and nicer to use, but it doesn't do Windows and Step 7, Proficy Machine Edition, or RSLogix500/5000 doesn't do OSX). One desktop (iMac) one hybrid mobile device, that is a true extension of my desktop.
     
  21. TheUndertow macrumors 6502

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    #21
    Last I checked, Consumerism is what drives the economy...one's definition of "excessive" differs based on your income. Excessive IMO ends up on credit cards or financing.

    Also I never stated it was a "computer problem" though I did go through so many due to "computer problems" (Asus W3j, Asus G71G-A2, Asus G71G-Q).
     

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