I would like some input from professional photographers.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by s061aew, Jan 3, 2009.

  1. s061aew macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
    Location:
    Mississippi
    #1
    Hi, My name is Adrienne and I was given a Canon Rebel XSI with two lense for Christmas from my husband. I do not know a THING about photography other than I have played around in Picasa...Anyway to cut to the chase. I had my resolution or selection set on Maximum. I understand that this is 12.2 megapixels and 72 dpi from what I have read. Well, I took some awesome shots on the camera. I went into Picasa to edit them..and when I took them to Walmart to print them out, they were a total blur, I was so upset. Anyway I am a smart, serious person, I am just ignorant to photography. My question is do I need to lower the image quality selection to the "RAW" option, and then I can edit it as a digital negative, and then adjust my DPI in photoshop, I purchased that also. My pictures looked better on my two hundred dollar sony cybershot I have been using, so I KNOW I am doing somthing wrong. I know photography is in the eye of the beholder, I know that. But I can't stand a fuzzy picture, and I just don't think it's the camera! Please any advice on what to do I would greatly appreciate. Also, what DPI does a pic need to be, to print out and it look professional? Thanks!:p
     
  2. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #2
    Do these pictures appear blurry on your computer as well, or only in the printed version? Would it be possible for you to post one of these pictures as an example?

    300 dpi will give you very nice images (although I'm not familiar with Walmart printing, or their recommended specifications).

    Also, if you can handle the file sizes you should certainly shoot in RAW. The editing process is more versatile, and you retain more information (data).
     
  3. s061aew thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
    Location:
    Mississippi
    #3

    They are perectly clear on my computer. They look like a million bucks. That is why I am so confused.
     
  4. fountaineer macrumors member

    fountaineer

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    #4
    I think the problem you are having is shutter and iso settings. What mode did you take the pictures? Automatic, manual, Av, T, etc..
    I suggest you do some light reading by googling photography just to get familiar with the common terms that will help you understand what makes what. Shutter, aperture, iso, Stops, white balance.

    The idea is to have enough light for the camera to expose. if there isn't enough light the lens aperture should be open as much as possible. So the letter f. corresponds to that. The smaller the number the more light is allowed through the lens. If that hits the max then open up the shutter.

    the slower the shutter the more light also gets into the camera. The trick here however is that if the shutter is open for too long any movement of the subject or you hand jitters will register as streaks. So here you want to find a balance. I usually try not to keep the shutter longer than 1/30-40th of a second when there might be movement. If you rest the camera on a tripod and decide to shoot stars at night opening a shutter for as l0ng as a few minutes will give you longer exposure and register even stars or clouds at night. But then you can't move the camera.

    Next is ISO which corresponds to the artificial gain in a DSLR camera such as yours. yours goes i think from 100 asa to 1600. increasing the asa will let you shoot in darker situations but at a cost of grain.

    Anyway read up a bit about all those terms and as you did shoot tests. shoot tests with different iso settings, and shutter speeds and upload to the computer for comparison.

    All in all in the case of blurry pictures you have to set up the shutter to be faster than what you were using at the time. So if it was 1/15th of a second increase it to 30 or 40. if you can get it faster even better. open the aperture to it's fullest and see if that gives you enough light. if not than increase the iso number by an increment which goes up by double 100, 200, 400 etc..

    The next thing you want to read is how to use the exposure meter built in the camera. If you look through the viewfinder you will see a digital line wth references going left and right. left means the subject you are pointing the camera at is reading a bit dark. it either is dark or maybe a dark sweater. the line going more right refers to overexposure. so look through the lens at various objects, walls, tables in your room and see how the line changes and the objects are light differently or are painted dark. google grescale and spot meter exposure to help you with that.

    Lastly read in the manual or google(even better) how the automatic, AV, TV, M, etc.. vary in function. I suggest learning what av and tv do and shoot with that as they are semi automatic modes. They allow you to have control over say the shutter but the camera automatically compensates the apeture and vice versa. As you get comfortable with that shoot more in manual.

    Lastly the DPI is camera resolution is the important spec of that camera. a 12 mega pixel camera isn't much better or useful from a 6mega pixel. That's just an advertising ploy in most cases. Unless you are blowing up the photos on a larger canvas the difference isn't noticed. the quality comes from the pictures aesthetic, and printing quality. in most cases wal mart will give you. since memory cards are large enough these days i would should either large jpegs or raw.

    also download or buy aperture or adobe light room to see how you can further manipulate the photos in the computer with white balance, colours, brightness, contrast, etc..

    the canon you have is a great camera. enjoy it and the best part is that you will be learning something new a long time while getting better and better with each day.

    i can't believe or ranted for so long. i apologize for any mispelling and grammar. This was a rushed write up but i hope it helps with your start.
     
  5. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #5
    First of all, a camera doesn't have dpi, that's an output measurement.

    Did you also try to print an unedited one? When you zoomed in on the screen, did you see any blurriness, because small pictures on the screen often look more in-focus than larger ones actually are.

    The "rule of thumb" in photography is to shoot at a shutter speed of 1/focal length or faster for hand-held shots, but never slower than 1/30th of a second (personally, I try to never go slower than 1/60th of a second unsupported.) So if your lens is 18mm, try to keep it at 1/30th or faster, but if your lens is 100mm, try to keep it at 1/125th or faster (always round to the faster nearest shutter speed.)

    I'd recommend finding a beginning photography book at your local book store.
     
  6. fountaineer macrumors member

    fountaineer

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    #6
    if they look good on the computer than try taking them to another printing place. 300dpi is very good.
     
  7. s061aew thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
    Location:
    Mississippi
    #7
    I had it set on auto mode...not program mode where you adjust it all. I know I am not to that point yet. What threw me off was that all the pics I didn't edit were awesome. The ones I edited looked like crap...like the lips were like tiny squares and really blurry. I edited through Picasa, and I clicked whatever looked good on the screen. I didn't layer it like you do in Photoshop. I added some text to the pictures, and even the text was blurry. It's weird.
     
  8. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Location:
    Northern/Central VA
    #8
    Perhaps you saved as a very low-res JPEG? Perhaps you saved for 72dpi output? Frontiers go to 300dpi and suck below about 170 and above 300. 72dpi is an old screen output resolution.
     
  9. jbernie macrumors 6502a

    jbernie

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #9
    I don't know Picassa but when you do a file > save as in jpg format many apps give you an "options" button where you can then select compression, it sounds like you have either a default of high compression/lower quality and need to adjust it. Obviously depending on the application it could be under a more generic menu like preferences or settings.

    Since the issue is on the modified files not the originals it sounds like a setting is off more than you are actually doing anything wrong.
     
  10. wheelhot macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2007
    #10
    Hmm, why dont when you export your photos, you choose export at current resolution or something, dont bother to downgrade the photo or something, let the photo people resize it for you.

    I suggest saving in TIFF and JPEG.
     

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