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Jonathan Zufi's gorgeous coffee table book "Iconic: A Photographic Tribute to Apple Innovation", about 30 years of Apple design, has been updated just in time for the holiday shopping season. The new book includes many more photographs, with a particular focus on prototypes. There is also a new cover, and several new special editions.

"ICONIC: The Classic Edition" is similar to the original $75 book, updated with 16 additional pages of pictures as well as an updated cover featuring the original Macintosh 128K. It's available for $55 on Amazon.

"ICONIC: Classic Plus Edition" is the same book but with a special black slip cover with ICONIC foil stamped on the front to protect it and give it a unique look. It's available for $99 from the Iconic website, shipping in early December.

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ICONIC: Ultimate Edition" includes a special white clamshell case with a custom embedded LED that pulses like a sleeping Apple notebook when moved, though, sadly, current generation Apple notebooks no longer pulse when sleeping. The Ultimate Edition is available from ICONIC's website for $250, shipping in early December.
The new Ultimate Edition of ICONIC is offered in a white Cromwell Aristo Grain clamshell case with a custom PCB designed to pulse an LED embedded inside the case itself.

The circuit is powered by the high-performance, low-power Atmel 8-bit AVR RISC-based microcontroller which combines 1KB ISP flash memory, 32B SRAM, 4 general purpose I/O lines, 16 general purpose working registers, a 16-bit timer/counter with two PWM channels, internal and external interrupts, programmable watchdog timer with internal oscillator, an internal calibrated oscillator, and 4 software selectable power saving modes.
The book includes photographs of rare Apple products like the Apple II, a circuit board from the Apple I, the "Flower Power" iMac G3, and an Apple Lisa 2. It also features more modern products like iPods, and also offers an entire chapter on packaging. The book has little text, but it does offer forewords and introductions from original Apple employees like Daniel Kottke and Steve Wozniak.

Article Link: 'Iconic' Coffee Table Book Updated With More Photos, Special Edition w/Pulsing LED Sleep Light
 

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stiligFox

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Apr 24, 2009
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hmmm. Makes me think about building something with that pulsing light. Apple's classic pulse was a bit too fast for syncing with breathing at night. Slowing it down a bit and it would be great for breathing exercise at night before sleeping ^^ (Bit off, bit on topic)
 
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CFreymarc

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If all they are doing with the microcontrler is variying level pulsing a white LED with the microcontorler, they made a poor choice. A low end PIC would have done the job.

Now if they have an Apple I emulator in the firmware as an Easter egg, then good choice.
 
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macduke

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Jun 27, 2007
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The circuit is powered by the high-performance, low-power Atmel 8-bit AVR RISC-based microcontroller which combines 1KB ISP flash memory, 32B SRAM, 4 general purpose I/O lines, 16 general purpose working registers, a 16-bit timer/counter with two PWM channels, internal and external interrupts, programmable watchdog timer with internal oscillator, an internal calibrated oscillator, and 4 software selectable power saving modes.

Can anyone confirm if this is the most powerful slipcover in the world in terms of raw processing power?
 
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gugy

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CFreymarc

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Can anyone confirm if this is the most powerful slipcover in the world in terms of raw processing power?

No it is not. I worked on a project years ago that had a 16-bit microncontroller running a capactive touch surface and LEDs slipping around an annual report booklet. It was a good year for them and it was all out. Good Christmas party!
 
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John Bokma

macrumors newbie
Jun 14, 2013
26
2
and I was about to ask who would buy this. Dont get me wrong, I love apple and this book seems nice. But $75 to $250 just seems pricey.

I would buy this; it's nothing to prices for some text books, e.g. The Biology of Opiliones is currently 146+ USD on Amazon. Today 224.14 USD of books arrived at our house, the most expensive one being "Programming in Haskell"; 57.07 USD. And it's only 181 pages...
 
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sshambles

macrumors 6502a
Oct 19, 2005
740
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Those of you asking, who would buy this - me.
I'm not big or knowledgeable on most older Apple or Mac products and thought it would be interesting to show my kids one day. That and I wanted to see what they would look like anyhow, since I've only used an iMac in 2002, PowerBook in Uni and iMacs ever since.
 
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macduke

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Jun 27, 2007
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No it is not. I worked on a project years ago that had a 16-bit microncontroller running a capactive touch surface and LEDs slipping around an annual report booklet. It was a good year for them and it was all out. Good Christmas party!

I am very satisfied that I got a response in such a short period of time. You guys never cease to amaze me.

Well in that case I'll just buy the standard edition and wedge it between my day one iPad and my iPad Air 2.
 
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CFreymarc

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I am very satisfied that I got a response in such a short period of time. You guys never cease to amaze me.

Well in that case I'll just buy the standard edition and wedge it between my day one iPad and my iPad Air 2.

Love to see a sleeve with a USB port and have it function as a flash drive with a PDF of the book it's covering.
 
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alanh98

macrumors newbie
Nov 26, 2014
2
0
If all they are doing with the microcontrler is variying level pulsing a white LED with the microcontorler, they made a poor choice. A low end PIC would have done the job.

I'm not sure what you mean. If you mean "PIC" as in the product family made by MicroChip, a PIC - even a comparable PIC10 - is a "microcontroller" in the same way as a ATTINY9. The only comparable PIC MicroChip makes is a PIC10 in a SOT23 and the specs are very close to the tiny. Maybe they just like Atmel? I'm not sure of a easier or cheaper way to ramp the LED like they've done other than a small MCU.

If you mean "PIC" as in something else, please clarify. I'm always willing to learn about new things.
 
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Traverse

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Mar 11, 2013
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and I was about to ask who would buy this. Dont get me wrong, I love apple and this book seems nice. But $75 to $250 just seems pricey.

If you're an Apple enthusist you're used to pricey ;)


I didn't even know this existed? How long has it been around? How often is updated?

It looks fascinating.

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hmmm. Makes me think about building something with that pulsing light. Apple's classic pulse was a bit too fast for syncing with breathing at night. Slowing it down a bit and it would be great for breathing exercise at night before sleeping ^^ (Bit off, bit on topic)

THAT'S IT!!! Why didn't I see that before! I had to cover that light when I slept because it bothered me for some reason. Not because of the light itself, but something seemed off. That's what it was! Thank you!
 
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CFreymarc

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I'm not sure what you mean. If you mean "PIC" as in the product family made by MicroChip, a PIC - even a comparable PIC10 - is a "microcontroller" in the same way as a ATTINY9. The only comparable PIC MicroChip makes is a PIC10 in a SOT23 and the specs are very close to the tiny. Maybe they just like Atmel? I'm not sure of a easier or cheaper way to ramp the LED like they've done other than a small MCU.

If you mean "PIC" as in something else, please clarify. I'm always willing to learn about new things.

You named it right. To get down to brass tacks, if I was given this job -- just to ramp an LED. I'd use a PWM (pulse width modulated) signal at around 100 to 300 Hz and have a 8-bit, 8-pin, surface mount, PIC10F206 ($0.25 in volume!) do the job. Yes, you could have hard coded logic with no programming create a PWM, but these days, a single part programmed for a PWM is a lot cheaper than discrete logic not to mention part count and assembly time.

In enough volume, the factory or the contract manufacturer can code burn the parts. I'd have some fun and route out the serial debug port and keep the firmware unprotected for someone to play with it. They can post their hacks on line and give the product more promotion. Thus my client nor myself pays for the "exploitation" and we cash in more.
 
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furi0usbee

macrumors 68000
Jul 11, 2008
1,781
1,264
I got the original and thought it was put together nicely. The only gripe I had was that the images were on the dark side, and it would have been really nice if the backgrounds for each image were masked out, just showing the product. The lighting used to photograph the items was not that great. I was expecting the photographer to try to replicate the "Apple way" of product photography, with great lighting, but that wasn't the case. In all, a great book, and I did get the supplement in the mail, which is great.

For me, anyway, the quality of the photographs were an issue.
 
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shrineofapple

macrumors newbie
Aug 30, 2011
4
0
Yeah, it's a nice book. I bought it last year. So I hope to get these additional pages soon.

If you haven't receive it yet, you should within the next week - I'm only half way through sending the supplements out. You can also contact me via my website and I'll confirm the status of your supplement. Thank you!

----------

I got the original and thought it was put together nicely. The only gripe I had was that the images were on the dark side, and it would have been really nice if the backgrounds for each image were masked out, just showing the product. The lighting used to photograph the items was not that great. I was expecting the photographer to try to replicate the "Apple way" of product photography, with great lighting, but that wasn't the case. In all, a great book, and I did get the supplement in the mail, which is great.

For me, anyway, the quality of the photographs were an issue.

Thanks for the feedback. Actually the look/feel you're describing is what I was hoping to avoid. There's a book called 'Apple Design' (http://amzn.com/3775730117) that has a collection of photographs that are showcased exactly as you've described - backgrounds masked out, lots of white. I felt that if I went for that look, it would be more of a catalog - it's really just a personal taste I guess, but I have received similar feedback to yours from other readers as well. Also make sure you check out the interview with Peter Bellanger at http://vrge.co/YFkhgG who is responsible for Apple's amazing product photography...

Glad you got the supplement and I appreciate your support of my project.
 
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gugy

macrumors 68040
Jan 31, 2005
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If you haven't receive it yet, you should within the next week - I'm only half way through sending the supplements out. You can also contact me via my website and I'll confirm the status of your supplement. Thank you!

----------



Thanks for the feedback. Actually the look/feel you're describing is what I was hoping to avoid. There's a book called 'Apple Design' (http://www.amazon.com/dp/3775730117/ref=cm_sw_su_dp) that has a collection of photographs that are showcased exactly as you've described - backgrounds masked out, lots of white. I felt that if I went for that look, it would be more of a catalog - it's really just a personal taste I guess, but I have received similar feedback to yours from other readers as well. Also make sure you check out the interview with Peter Bellanger at http://www.theverge.com/2013/5/8/43...icity-photographer-peter-belanger-on-shooting who is responsible for Apple's amazing product photography...

Glad you got the supplement and I appreciate your support of my project.

Thanks for the feedback. Yes I did get an email back from you.
I appreciate the idea of sending updates at no cost. I am just surprise it was this quick. Is this something you are planning moving forward?
Either way, great book and great customer service.
 
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alanh98

macrumors newbie
Nov 26, 2014
2
0
you named it right. To get down to brass tacks, if i was given this job -- just to ramp an led. I'd use a pwm (pulse width modulated) signal at around 100 to 300 hz and have a 8-bit, 8-pin, surface mount, pic10f206 ($0.25 in volume!) do the job. Yes, you could have hard coded logic with no programming create a pwm, but these days, a single part programmed for a pwm is a lot cheaper than discrete logic not to mention part count and assembly time.

In enough volume, the factory or the contract manufacturer can code burn the parts. I'd have some fun and route out the serial debug port and keep the firmware unprotected for someone to play with it. They can post their hacks on line and give the product more promotion. Thus my client nor myself pays for the "exploitation" and we cash in more.

You still must control the duty cycle of a PWM to change brightness for the ramp. Toggling a GPIO directly is the same thing just you don't use a dedicated peripheral. Simplier IMO. The programming interface is pinned out on that board, so you could hack it if you wanted.

PIC10F206 vs ATTINY4 are almost the exact same specs, exact same package, and neither require any other supporting parts. So it just comes down to what the developer is more familiar with to get the project done quicker. There is no right or wrong solution between the two.
 
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Smigit

macrumors 6502
Feb 21, 2011
326
165
Just grabbed it. Wanted the original version but shipping to Australia was basically the same cost as the book itself and I wasn't prepared to drop $150 on it. Price at the moment seems alright and shipping costs seem to have drastically improved, not that that aspect matters too much since there's a free shipping promo if you use an Amex, but nice to see them finally sort out some of the distribution woes.
 
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CFreymarc

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You still must control the duty cycle of a PWM to change brightness for the ramp. Toggling a GPIO directly is the same thing just you don't use a dedicated peripheral. Simplier IMO. The programming interface is pinned out on that board, so you could hack it if you wanted.

PIC10F206 vs ATTINY4 are almost the exact same specs, exact same package, and neither require any other supporting parts. So it just comes down to what the developer is more familiar with to get the project done quicker. There is no right or wrong solution between the two.

Yes, a time varying PWM can be done by either part.

Yes and no. The "right vs. wrong" comes down the volume deal you can get between the two different suppliers. If the volume is sufficient enough, the coast savings can pay for the right contractor familiar with the part.

I have seen high volume, consumer electronic developers read the earnings reports of different semiconductor suppliers and the press for a better deal on the company with the lower earnings so they can up their value based on chip volume sold.
 
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Oracle1729

macrumors 6502a
Feb 4, 2009
638
0
....pulses like a sleeping Apple notebook when moved, though, sadly, current generation Apple notebooks no longer pulse when sleeping.

First I heard about no longer having the pulsing light. I already hate their new notebooks, but is Timmy really trying to kill the company?

Reminds me of the time I booted up in a programming class full of PC laptops. Someone heard my apple chime and just sighed and commented how much they loved Apple. It's the little touches that make the Apple experience and changing the iconic elements just takes away for the experience.
 
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