iOS If you work for apple, you can't make iPhone apps?

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Jona7

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jul 8, 2007
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Miami, FL
Is it true that if you work for Apple Computers Inc., you can't make iPhone apps and sell them on iTunes? Because I had an interview today to work @ the apple store and i told them i was working on a few iphone apps of my own. Surprisingly, he said that if you work for apple, you can't make and sell iphone apps on the itunes app store....is this true? or is the manager full of bologna? I think he is because he didnt sound too sure.
 

aristobrat

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2005
12,262
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If you work for Apple, anything Apple related that you create (even if it's on your own time), ... they retain the rights to.

Apple employees can read and participate in forums like this. They can't disclose any private Apple information, and they're not allowed to discuss anything they may read on a site like this with customers.
 

firewood

macrumors 604
Jul 29, 2003
7,823
1,081
Silicon Valley
Nowadays, Apple runs a very tight ship. Most employees won't do anything that would even lead to a hint of suspicion that they subliminally suggested anything at all about any Apple confidential or internal information.
 

thegoldenmackid

macrumors 604
Dec 29, 2006
7,770
5
dallas, texas
No. Apple Employees are not supposed to read non-official Apple related websites. Presumably, so that they don't open their mouth up in the store about things like case coloring. In the words of an Apple Genius "I unofficially read that site."
 

aristobrat

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2005
12,262
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There is nothing an Apple Retail employee signs that prevents them from reading non-official Apple related websites.

They do sign a document stating that they will not discuss internal Apple information with non-Apple people (which would include not posting internal Apple information on forums).

There is also a general Apple Retail policy that states employees shouldn't talk to customers about non-official Apple related information. If the information isn't publicly posted on Apple.com, then it's not to be discussed. That doesn't mean employees can't read non-official Apple related sites. They just can't talk about them to customers.
 

springsup

macrumors 65816
Feb 14, 2013
1,116
842
If you work for Apple, anything Apple related that you create (even if it's on your own time), ... they retain the rights to.

Apple employees can read and participate in forums like this. They can't disclose any private Apple information, and they're not allowed to discuss anything they may read on a site like this with customers.
How on Earth does Apple get away with that? They're your employer, not your slavemaster.

The fact that they employ you gives them exactly zero right to dictate how you spend your private time.

EDIT: Oh, apparently this is quite common in America. Researching a bit, it seems Americans are not free people; they are actually enslaved by their employers with no legal protections at all. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=123024596

What a bizarre place. Why would anybody who isn't a millionaire want to live in such a twisted system? Syrian refugees in Europe have more human dignity than working Americans.
 
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ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
8,738
4,420
How on Earth does Apple get away with that? They're your employer, not your slavemaster.

The fact that they employ you gives them exactly zero right to dictate how you spend your private time.

EDIT: Oh, apparently this is quite common in America. Researching a bit, it seems Americans are not free people; they are actually enslaved by their employers with no legal protections at all. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=123024596

What a bizarre place. Why would anybody who isn't a millionaire want to live in such a twisted system? Syrian refugees in Europe have more human dignity than working Americans.
Uh... all this is about is not sharing company secrets. That's a pretty normal request from employers around the world.

I'm not "enslaved by my employer". If my employer feels like firing me based on what I do during my time off, fine - I'll go work for another company. There's no shortage of job openings and there's a huge shortage of talent, so it's their loss. The things that employees get fired for doing during their time off tends to revolve around being a total dick - IE, making fun of homeless people. I'm not saying it's right that they can be fired over that (seems a bit messed up that they can be), but also... come on, really? What made anyone think that was a good idea? The company fires you because they don't want to be associated with someone who is a dick. Their employees are their public face. Even in your time off, you can't make your company look bad. Especially if you're salary... if you're salary, you're getting paid all the time, whether it's during working business hours or not. Hourly employees might be more free to do whatever when they're off the clock, since they're not collecting money during that time.

Back to the original topic of Apple employees not distributing apps, that makes sense to me. It's a free marketplace - Apple doesn't want the appearance of corruption. If Apple employees were allowed to distribute apps on the app store, other people would cry foul and say that those employees were tipping the scales. The non-Apple employees might stop making apps for fear that it's a waste of time and that the field is leveled against them.
 

xStep

macrumors 68020
Jan 28, 2003
2,013
100
Less lost in L.A.
If you work for Apple, anything Apple related that you create (even if it's on your own time), ... they retain the rights to.
To expand on the above...

I believe this has been settled in California years ago. If you work on your own project on your own time and on your own equipment, then you own it. The trick is to not use any of your companies resources. There maybe other stipulations such that your private work isn't directly related to the work you do for your company.

So, given the above, a store employee would be pretty safe to write software that ran on Apple hardware. That doesn't mean Apple has to allow employees distribution via their app stores.
 

grandM

macrumors 65816
Oct 14, 2013
1,104
57
Is it true that if you work for Apple Computers Inc., you can't make iPhone apps and sell them on iTunes? Because I had an interview today to work @ the apple store and i told them i was working on a few iphone apps of my own. Surprisingly, he said that if you work for apple, you can't make and sell iphone apps on the itunes app store....is this true? or is the manager full of bologna? I think he is because he didnt sound too sure.
Ask them if you can make android apps then ;)
 

deany

macrumors 68030
Sep 16, 2012
2,873
2,088
North Wales
Uh... all this is about is not sharing company secrets. That's a pretty normal request from employers around the world.

I'm not "enslaved by my employer". If my employer feels like firing me based on what I do during my time off, fine - I'll go work for another company. There's no shortage of job openings and there's a huge shortage of talent, so it's their loss. The things that employees get fired for doing during their time off tends to revolve around being a total dick - IE, making fun of homeless people. I'm not saying it's right that they can be fired over that (seems a bit messed up that they can be), but also... come on, really? What made anyone think that was a good idea? The company fires you because they don't want to be associated with someone who is a dick. Their employees are their public face. Even in your time off, you can't make your company look bad. Especially if you're salary... if you're salary, you're getting paid all the time, whether it's during working business hours or not. Hourly employees might be more free to do whatever when they're off the clock, since they're not collecting money during that time.

Back to the original topic of Apple employees not distributing apps, that makes sense to me. It's a free marketplace - Apple doesn't want the appearance of corruption. If Apple employees were allowed to distribute apps on the app store, other people would cry foul and say that those employees were tipping the scales. The non-Apple employees might stop making apps for fear that it's a waste of time and that the field is leveled against them.

''Especially if you're salary... if you're salary, you're getting paid all the time, whether it's during working business hours or not. Hourly employees might be more free to do whatever when they're off the clock, since they're not collecting money during that time.''

Rubbish.

Which country do you live in?

Utopia land.

No one gets paid for 'leisure time', except statutary or agreed holiday pay.
 

aristobrat

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2005
12,262
1,353
''Especially if you're salary... if you're salary, you're getting paid all the time, whether it's during working business hours or not. Hourly employees might be more free to do whatever when they're off the clock, since they're not collecting money during that time.''

Rubbish.

Which country do you live in?

Utopia land.

No one gets paid for 'leisure time', except statutary or agreed holiday pay.
I read his comment to mean that the general expectation when you're paid with salary in the US is that you're available to work 24x7 (if so needed), so there's often no clear "my work day starts here" and "my work day ends here" points.

Whereas with an hourly employee, once they clock out, the work day has officially ended, and there's no expectation that they could be doing official work at a later time.
 

deany

macrumors 68030
Sep 16, 2012
2,873
2,088
North Wales
I read his comment to mean that the general expectation when you're paid with salary in the US is that you're available to work 24x7 (if so needed), so there's often no clear "my work day starts here" and "my work day ends here" points.

Whereas with an hourly employee, once they clock out, the work day has officially ended, and there's no expectation that they could be doing official work at a later time.
so just to confirm USA employees on a 'salary' are expected to be available 24x7 (if needed).

I find that absolutely astonishing, no way a 'salary' UK employee would except that.
Its all about employers having to be flexible with working hours now to fit in with the employee.
i.e. the employee can almost dictate (within reason and so as not to impact on the business) to the employer when they want to work to make home life easier like child care etc.
The employer has to be seen to be as flexible as possible.

http://m.acas.org.uk/index.aspx?articleid=1616
 
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aristobrat

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2005
12,262
1,353
I find that absolutely astonishing, no way a 'salary' UK employee would except that.
Its all about employers having to be flexible with working hours now to fit in with the employee.
i.e. the employee can almost dictate (within reason and so as not to impact on the business)
We're talking about retail and tech companies/employees, right? What kind if magic exists in the UK to were things don't happen "after hours" in either environment to where action maybe be required by salary employees?
 

deany

macrumors 68030
Sep 16, 2012
2,873
2,088
North Wales
We're talking about retail and tech companies/employees, right? What kind if magic exists in the UK to were things don't happen "after hours" in either environment to where action maybe be required by salary employees?
Sorry I dont understand. I think what you are saying is things happen that need sorting outside of work hours.? and what happens then in the UK.

If that is what you mean its often done by phone with an inital 'I'm really sorry to trouble you on a Sunday/ on your day off etc'

I think 'salary' in US and 'salary' in the UK are different. From what I have now read I am very impressed with the US salary work ethic.
Can I ask what approximate % of the workforce is salary in USA?

The nearest we would get to the US salaried worker would be a Doctor or vet 'on call' after hours.

Otherwise they would be classified as 'self employed'.

As I say 'term and conditions of employment' in the UK are more and more 'bias' towards the employee.
 

*SteveB*

macrumors newbie
Jan 22, 2015
19
12
I think this is something that varies between different industries, some have a culture of working out of hours and some don't.

I'm in the UK, and my pay is calculated annually rather than hourly (I assume this is what you mean by salary), and I've had to work past midnight before if it's crunch time. I've occasionally worked a weekend day and in that case been paid the extra day. The flip side is that I can leave early if I have plans, so it swings both ways, although I definitely work longer than my contracted hours.

It depends on how much you get paid though. If I got paid half of what I do now then I wouldn't be prepared to work a minute over my contracted hours. If I got paid double what I do now, then I'd happily throw in a weekend day or sometimes work in the evenings.

Back to Apple. I worked in one of the Apple Stores (just serving customers, nothing special), years back, and that clause was in my contract then.
 
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