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Apple's newly-launched Self Service Repair program is a "great step" forward, but "not the unqualified win for repair enthusiasts that Apple's marketers would have you believe," according to do-it-yourself repair website iFixit.

apple-self-service-repair-iphone.jpeg

In a blog post today, iFixit's Elizabeth Chamberlain said the biggest problem with Apple's program is that parts must be paired with a device. When purchasing parts from Apple's Self Service Repair Store, a customer must enter a device's serial number or IMEI, and any parts ordered need to be paired with the same device after installation.

"Integrating a serial number check into their checkout process is a dire omen and could allow Apple the power to block even more repairs in the future," said Chamberlain. "Building the technology to provision individual repairs easily sets Apple up as the gateway to approve—or deny—any repairs in the future, with parts from any source."

To initiate the pairing process, known as System Configuration, Apple says customers will need to contact the Self Service Repair Store's support team by chat or phone. The parts store is operated by third-party company SPOT, not Apple.

iFixit said there is still "a lot to be excited about" with the details Apple announced, including availability of tools that only certified Apple technicians could access until now and free step-by-step visual repair manuals on Apple's website.

"We are really happy to see Apple making repair manuals available for everyone for free online," said Chamberlain. "Like, seriously happy. Like, we've-been-asking-for-this-for-twenty-years happy. They're selling their own proprietary repair tools to the public, too, again for the very first time. You can buy official Apple battery presses and display adhesive removal devices—or even, to our surprise, rent those devices."

iFixit remains optimistic that as Right to Repair legislation advances around the world, companies like Apple will be required to take further steps.

"At least Apple is getting some of their homework done in advance," said Chamberlain, about the initial phase of the program. "Manufacturers know the right to repair is coming—we'll get the rest of their assignments in due time."

Article Link: iFixit Says Apple's Self Service Repair Program is Great Step, But Has a Catch
 
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JosephAW

macrumors 603
May 14, 2012
6,114
8,196
It’s a trap, Apple will make even more money. People will rent the repair kit, order replacement parts, try to fix their device, they will break something inside, can’t get a refund on opened parts, will have to purchase new device to replace it because opening it cancels any original warranty on their device and taking it to Genius Bar will be rejected because you opened it.
Win win for Apple. :p
Just buy Apple care plus. Win win for you.
 

TMRJIJ

macrumors 68040
Dec 12, 2011
3,507
6,611
South Carolina, United States
"Integrating a serial number check into their checkout process is a dire omen and could allow Apple the power to block even more repairs in the future," said Chamberlain. "Building the technology to provision individual repairs easily sets Apple up as the gateway to approve—or deny—any repairs in the future, with parts from any source."
Seen quite a few stolen iPhones brought to my AASP. Don’t really see this as a problem per se if it prevents ‘marked’ iPhones from getting repaired for use
 
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MajorFubar

macrumors 68020
Oct 27, 2021
2,127
3,748
Lancashire UK
Still a step in the right direction and far better than nothing. It was hard to get a hold of those repair manuals back in the day.
No back in the day you could repair your device with some sticky-back plastic, an empty Fairy washing up liquid bottle, the tube from a used toilet roll and some knicker elastic. Not being able to perform basic repairs on devices is a recent problem.
 

ouimetnick

macrumors 68040
Aug 28, 2008
3,552
6,345
Beverly, Massachusetts
It’s a trap, Apple will make even more money. People will rent the repair kit, order replacement parts, try to fix their device, they will break something inside, can’t get a refund on opened parts, will have to purchase new device to replace it because opening it cancels any original warranty on their device and taking it to Genius Bar will be rejected because you opened it.
Win win for Apple. :p
Just buy Apple care plus. Win win for you.
Why would you open a device under warranty? If it was under warranty, it’s smart to take it to Apple, even if it’s a cracked display, on a phone that’s new enough to be under warranty, I’d let Apple do it.
 

ddtmm

macrumors regular
Jul 12, 2010
228
779
Apple has figured out they can sell you the parts and let you repair your own device for the same amount of money it would have cost for them to have done the repair. They just eliminated the labor cost.
 

Spock

macrumors 68040
Jan 6, 2002
3,448
7,354
Vulcan
All the custom specialty tools required to repair an iPhone is only a testament to how poorly they are designed.
Sort of, it can also be said that they are designed in a way that keeps them from becoming damaged. The engineering saved me when I dropped my iPhone 12 Pro Max in a sink of water. Making an electronic device water resistant takes some clever design and these tools help retain that.
 

rgwebb

macrumors 6502
Nov 27, 2005
461
1,214
All the custom specialty tools required to repair an iPhone is only a testament to how poorly they are designed.
You can make a phone that can be repaired with commercial off-the-shelf hardware but you may not like the look and feel of it.

The custom tools are often creations to mitigate damage and improve reliability of the repair work.
 

Danfango

macrumors 65816
Jan 4, 2022
1,294
5,778
London, UK
Actually I think I can see what this is and will break it down into a few simple statements.

1. iFixit found a market niche and promoted it as the right thing to do while selling inferior parts and equipment.
2. The manufacturer entered the same market with superior parts and equipment.
3. iFixit now has a failing business model because they got what they wanted and are switching to whining mode.
 
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