I'm done waiting, it's time to learn to love Windows

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by michael.richard1982, May 18, 2018.

  1. michael.richard1982 macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2018
    #1
    It seems Apple just doesn't want to be in the computer business.

    I need a powerful pro level desktop computer and Apple it seems just doesn't want my money.

    I'm willing to pay a high premium on hardware simply because I love MacOS. I didn't realize how much I hate Windows until I started using a Mac.

    Well I can't wait anymore. When Apple says they'll have a next generation Mac pro for "2019" this really means "Late 2019" which actually means "A late 2019 announcement with actual availability in-store early 2020" ... (and this is the best case assuming no further issues causing delays)

    I simply cannot wait this long. There is no excuse I'm willing to listen to for why it can take this length of time to redesign a computer case when you are manufacturing little of the core hardware yourself.

    I understand the mistakes they learned from in building the trashcan like the thermal issues it created, but it can't remotely justify 5+ years.

    I don't want to build a hackintosh, I just don't have the time to invest. Same with Linux, I tried once but it's too much of a time sucker to get everything working the way you want.

    The iMac Pro is out of the question, I'm not buying a computer and monitor as one unit.

    So it seems I have to get a Windows computer. Just the thought of having to go into the registry to make system changes is making me sick. But I'm going to learn to love it.

    The hip kid in the iPad commercial clearly told us Apple's future plans: "What's a computer?"
     
  2. BrianBaughn macrumors 603

    BrianBaughn

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2011
    Location:
    Baltimore, Maryland
    #2
    There are a lot of folks that would like something more expandable and perhaps fully upgradable than what is currently offered. I'd be interested to hear what it is in particular you'd like to see, if anything, beyond a Mac Mini with iMac Pro specs as you didn't give much detail.
     
  3. bsbeamer macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2012
    #3
    I've made some upgrades to a 2012 MacPro 5,1 that are keeping it going for another several months. Hopeful it can get through end of 2018 and then have better clarity on the roadmap of where I'm heading for the next several years. I've also held off on upgrading my MacBookPro laptop because of the lack of clarity surrounding the desktop. I know many that are in this exact position. FCP7 kept me on Macs for awhile, but switched to Adobe and the OS became less important. It's not a change I want to make, but may be a change I will need to make.

    If your work does not demand a new machine immediately, I'd suggest waiting about two weeks until WWDC and see if there is anything coming out of that before making a decision. It is doubtful the Pro product most here are looking for would be announced there, but they MIGHT be a little transparent with plans or teasing something.

    One thing is certain - if Apple ditches Intel processors, I'll almost certainly be on Windows 10 this time next year.
     
  4. pat500000 macrumors G3

    pat500000

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2015
    #4
    I’m going for windows..no problem with that since i got z8 series. I have gift card with large balance that i need to use up. After that, i’m done with apple. Apple is not a productive that i remebered.
     
  5. ugahairydawgs macrumors 68030

    ugahairydawgs

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  6. NT1440 macrumors G5

    NT1440

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    May 18, 2008
  7. Plutonius macrumors 604

    Plutonius

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    Location:
    New Hampshire, USA
    #7
    I can't see anyone holding off on a computer purchase based on promises. We also have no idea what the next Mac Pro will look like other than modular.
     
  8. h9826790 macrumors G4

    h9826790

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #8
    My cMP dosn’t let me wait. It’s just dead, pretty sure it’s the logic board this time (but no spare part to test it). Power on, fans on, HDD spin, no chirm, PCIe SATA III card powered but no sign of reading the SSD, pure black screen with the Mac EFI GPU, unable to perform PRAM reset. And I can switch it off at anytime by single short press power button. Time to go Hackintosh :D
     
  9. MarkC426 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 14, 2008
    Location:
    UK
    #9
    What hardware requirements do you have, are you editing video, animation, music?
    Is all your software multi platform?

    Good luck with windows.....like you I positively detest it (use it in work).
     
  10. Future-Proof macrumors regular

    Future-Proof

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2018
    #10
    I don't agree with 99% of "Steve Jobs would do this. Steve Jobs would do that" but it seems that the "Steve didn't want people to open their computers" group at Apple have the upper hand at the moment, what with the "What's a computer?" iPad and the closed iMac Pro. However, when Steve came back to Apple he drew the famous 2x2 grid of Desktop / Laptop and Consumer / Pro. He was thinking sensibly and Apple's fortunes grew. I think the only way to topple the "don't open your computer" group is to vote with your wallet until the financials start to make sense again for them to offer that option to pro users.

    I'm not a pro user but hoping they also update the Mac mini at WWDC. Good luck with Windows while you wait. I have a £650 gaming laptop that far exceeds the quality of rMBs and MBPs especially in terms of the stable chiclet keyboard (which Apple popularized). For pro users there are so many options with Windows towers and you can even design your own. Just wish garageband and other apps were available on windows but there are always alternatives, and Windows 10 really doesn't suck like Android does. Just less secure than macOS apparently.
     
  11. petejoho macrumors newbie

    petejoho

    Joined:
    May 18, 2018
    #11
    This is silly. The entire process of building a Hackintosh takes less than a day, even if you have never built a PC before in your life. One hour to pick out guaranteed-compatible hardware from a list at a hackintosh site and order it all from Amazon. Once it's all arrived, three hours to fully assemble the PC, which includes time to watch how-to-assemble-a-PC videos on YouTube. Then one hour to install MacOS, maybe two hours if there's any kind of troubleshooting to do. Easy as pie. That's 6 total hours, less if you already know how to build PCs and your MacOS install goes smoothly (as it usually does). You're saying you don't have 3/4 of a business day to invest in building a new computer?
     
  12. bsbeamer macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2012
    #12
    I have worked for several clients who do not want their projects being executed on Hackinstosh machines. They do not trust the "hack" of getting around many of the native OS safeguards. They stipulate in their contracts that the user is responsible for the safety of their data throughout the project. They require the latest OS updates to be installed in a timely manner (usually 2-weeks or less) and some require proof when working remotely. Several clients suspect some IT security breaches in the past were directly tied to the past use of Hackintosh machines. If my livelihood and client relationship was on the line, I would not trust a Hackintosh machine.

    You can debate the issue as long as you want, but it is a tough position to be in for those who use their machines for business. It is why many who work outside of boutique shops have abandoned the Mac platform. I enjoy using these machines and my experience with them allows me to be more creative than on a Windows platform. I wish there were viable alternatives provided by Apple.
     
  13. lpolarityl macrumors 6502

    lpolarityl

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2009
    #13
    If you don't mind my asking.... what will you be doing with this computer (that involves making registry changes)? You mention the thought of doing so is making you sick, sounds like you aren't very familiar with making registry changes. First thing you'll learn to love, in regards to making registry changes... learn to export the key so you have a backup. That way you can import it if a change you made needs to be reverted.

    WWDC is right around the corner. I think its safe to say that we might see some interesting hardware announcements to the Mac lineup.
     
  14. Dr. Stealth macrumors 6502a

    Dr. Stealth

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    Sep 14, 2004
    Location:
    SoCal-Surf City USA
    #14

    What happened ? Pull too much power from the 6-pins ? ;)
     
  15. h9826790, May 18, 2018
    Last edited: May 18, 2018

    h9826790 macrumors G4

    h9826790

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #15
    Sure nothing related to that, Pixlas mod has been done. If it’s power related, then what I proved is that Pixlas mod kill my cMP in 7 days but over stress the mini 6pin for years doesn’t.

    Anyway, the logic board start to show issue few weeks ago. Ethernet occasionally dead after boot in both Windows and macOS. So, definitely hardware related.

    Today, when the Mac is working as usual. I want to reboot to Windows. But the restart only gives me black screen. No boot since then, change battery won’t help, SMC reset won’t help, can’t preform PRAM reset since unable to have POST.

    If I can get a cheap replacement, may be I will fix that as my backup computer.
     
  16. Roadstar macrumors 65816

    Roadstar

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2006
    Location:
    Vantaa, Finland
    #16
    With multiple embarrassing security flaws in High Sierra alone, I'm not quite sure about that "Just less secure than macOS apparently" part. Windows security nowadays isn't the Swiss cheese it used to be before XP SP2. The current security model first introduced in Vista also changed many things for the better security-wise, even though the initial implementation (overzealous UAC anyone?) was a UX trainwreck.
     
  17. Anarchy99 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2003
    Location:
    CA
    #17
    It saddens me that the default reaction when you give up on Mac hardware is windows

    You should try Hackintoshing
    especially if you're buying new hardware anyway you can get more MacOS friendly hardware to avoid any issues allowing for vanilla kernels etc. ( updates not breaking drivers etc)

    Once set up they are stable Plus you then have the added bonus of already know when your workflow but without having to relearn a new operating system etc.

    Not to mention if more and more people start doing it the better
    what sends more of a signal to Apple to get there $#!? Together ;) ;)
     
  18. Roadstar macrumors 65816

    Roadstar

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2006
    Location:
    Vantaa, Finland
    #18
    Well, for business use that’s often the only viable alternative. As bsbeamer pointed out above, security requirements set by customers often rule out Hackintoshes, and then there’s also the repair/maintenance part to worry about. With a Hackintosh you’re the one whose billing hours will be spent on fixing whatever’s wrong with the computer instead of doing your actual work. Of course there’s a possibility that a routine patch hoses a Windows machine as well, but the risk is amplified a bit too much on a Hackintosh.
     
  19. AidenShaw macrumors P6

    AidenShaw

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2003
    Location:
    The Peninsula
    #19
    There's also the very real chance that Apple may decide to stop tolerating Hacks and will simply break them. (A simple serial number check that queries a gestalt database would be a first step.)

    Fortunately, if that happens, buying a Windows license will get you running again (just in case your build didn't come with an OEM license).
     
  20. Plutonius macrumors 604

    Plutonius

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2003
    Location:
    New Hampshire, USA
    #20
    I had something similar when installing High Sierra on my cMP 4,1. I was pretty sure it was the logic board.

    I ended up replacing it with a cMP 5,1.
     
  21. rafark, May 18, 2018
    Last edited: May 18, 2018

    rafark macrumors 6502a

    rafark

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2017
    #21
    Yep. He created an account on a Mac forum to talk about macs.
     
  22. profdraper macrumors newbie

    profdraper

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2017
    #22
    Did this a couple of years ago. No problem. Windows 10 is just another skeuomorphic thing: trash can, folders, icons, drag n' drop etc. No big deal at all & Win theses days is very very slick - a far cry from the early days of why we went mac in the first place & how awful Windows once was. Lose that. Modern Windows workstations are very slick and very fast. Mine is for 4k video production and recording studio composition, recording and film sound track etc.

    The 'registry' thing ... no. Old, old story. We're not doing Windows 95 any more. The least attractive aspect of Win10 is really about a clean system install should the need arise. In some ways more complex than Mac OS, but on the the other hand Win can use a built-in roll back, 'restore' issue where it keeps snapshots of last system builds. A very far cry from Apple's awful Time Machine. In any case, with any real problems /mods for Apple, one has to resort to Unix commands anyway. The usual 'broken' fix for mac is to install a whole new system; in Win 10, there are many, simple lower level fixes so that one doesn't have to resort to a complete re-install, then recover third party license install codes etc.

    The Hackintosh thing: the complete worst of both worlds. Sure, we get to keep Mac OS and the machine can indeed be built form recommended parts quite easily and cheaply (just like a PC) - but - it cannot be reliably be maintained and upgraded because of the substantial hardware limitations of Mac OS kernals etc. Far too much fan-boy stuff there, and to what end? Just because we're afraid of Windows? Really?

    Apple produces machines that still are comparatively overpriced, underpowered and non-expandable. The MacOS limitations still extend to Hackintosh. This fresh gen of Intel Mobos and Chips provide a lot of room to move over the next few years and indeed run CUDA & Nividia of all levels and full throttle, Certainly mandatory for Video, Gaming, CAD and the rest. Ditto pretty much any other hardware you can throw at it. Far better backward compatibility as well.

    Win doesn't bug you incessantly like Mac OS does with psychopathic 'would you like to' messages that seem to be all about Apple and not about you and your work. Windows can be completely silenced in this respect, and again, completely the reverse of Win 95 vs Apple OS days (remember that damn Microsoft paperclip?)

    Get a good build /support guy at your local computer store. They want repeat business, upgrades, add-ons over time (something Apple can't do).

    Spend just a little time understanding and using Windows. Its just fine.
     
  23. AidenShaw macrumors P6

    AidenShaw

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2003
    Location:
    The Peninsula
    #23
    Amen.

    For every registry whine, there are a bunch of "did you delete the plists?" posts.

    Would you rather have your config data in a bunch of text files scattered about the filesystem, or have it in a robust transactional database. I'll take the latter.
     
  24. Anarchy99 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2003
    Location:
    CA
    #24
    clearly you haven't worked in IT if you still think that the registry it is a robust transactional database

    Forgetting that registry problems are significantly more common than any issue involving plist files
    Honestly from a troubleshooting/ technical support standpoint I would much rather have individual files in known folders that can be replaced or deleted without the corruption issues of the registry
     
  25. AidenShaw macrumors P6

    AidenShaw

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2003
    Location:
    The Peninsula
    #25
    When have you ever seen data that was corrupted in the registry? Ever? (Since running NT alpha builds in 1990 or 1991 I've only seen one actual registry corruption, and that was on a system that was getting cache memory errors. A single bit error on a key name created a "Nedscape" registry entry instead of "Netscape".)

    If an application writes incorrect data into a plist file or the registry - that's an application error - not registry or plist corruption. And file corruptions due to crashes or power hits are more likely than corruption in a transactional database.

    The registry is a bogeyman for people who don't understand the system. I much prefer having a single robust, searchable database for configuration information.
     

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