I'm ready to remove Mavericks.....

Discussion in 'OS X Yosemite (10.10)' started by dbrandt6, Aug 30, 2014.

  1. dbrandt6 macrumors member

    dbrandt6

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    Location:
    Michigan
    #1
    and reduce my HD from 2 partitions to one... Yosemite. Right now my Mavericks partition is the upper one (300 GB) and Yosemite is the lower partition (180 GB).
    Would someone please let me know the correct way to do this? Thank you very much!
     
  2. Ddyracer macrumors 68000

    Ddyracer

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    #2
    Not sure but I think you have to reformat or erase everything in order to go back to one partition and still have your full GB on your drive.

    Hopefully someone can correct me here, because I'm not so sure now.
     
  3. Swiss-G macrumors 6502a

    Swiss-G

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #3
    Not necessarily.

    Assuming the Mavericks partition is the first on the drive and Yosemite the second You can delete the Yosemite partition, enlarge the Mavericks partition and then upgrade the Mavericks partition to Yosemite.
     
  4. GamerSweZ HQ macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2014
    #4
    Oh yeah! If you have the latest developer preview can you Easy delete the partision now ! #
     
  5. Mike Boreham macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2006
    Location:
    UK
    #5
    Why not just update the Mavericks partition to Yosemite, then use Disk Utility to delete the old Yosemite partition and resize the new Yosemite?
     
  6. snarfquest macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2013
    #6
    That's what I did yesterday with DP6.
     
  7. ssls6 macrumors 6502a

    ssls6

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2013
    #7
    I think it's a huge mistake to do this...but to each his own.
     
  8. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #8
    Make sure you have everything backed up in case this goes badly, but this should work.

    First check in Disk Util to see if the Yosemite partition is shown as a logical volume due to core storage being turned on. If it is, convert the partition by running the command below in Terminal.

    Code:
    diskutil cs revert disk1
    Once the revert is done, command-r boot into recovery. Then start Disk Utility and go to the restore tab. Now drag the Yosemite partition into the source field and the Mavericks partition into the destination filed then click restore. This will clone the bottom partition to the top one.

    Once the restore is done reboot and hold the option key as it starts then select the top partition (now Yosemite partition) to boot to. Confirm everything looks good then go to Disk Util and remove the bottom partition and expand the top one following this.
     
  9. MarcBook macrumors 6502a

    MarcBook

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Location:
    Jersey, Channel Islands
    #9
    Why's that? I've been running just Yosemite since the beta access opened and it's been great. Few little bugs here and there, but nothing serious (especially with Beta 2).

    I've had everything backed up the entire time just in case, but I haven't had any need at all to revert to Mavericks.

    P.S. I realise that not everyone has had such a smooth ride, but OP appears to have experienced no issues on a separate partition.
     
  10. shenan1982 macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #10
    If you have to ask how to accomplish this, I beg to differ about you being ready to move to using only a Developer Preview.
     
  11. ssls6 macrumors 6502a

    ssls6

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2013
    #11
    Just experience with Mac seeds. The very next release could break something you depend upon, crater DNS or mDNS, whatever. It's an iterative process and while it is generally true each release is more stable than the last it is not absolutely true.

    The OP has Mavericks in the pole position and is looking at wiping that. From my experience, I would not do that. It's not hurting anything and could save a lot of grief and frustration.

    But like I said earlier, to each his own.
     

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