iMac 5k beat Mac Pro?

Discussion in 'iMac' started by mavericks7913, Aug 28, 2016.

  1. mavericks7913 macrumors 6502

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    #1
  2. cruisin macrumors 6502a

    cruisin

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    #2
    The classic Mac Pro has great expansion options, so if it comes with the CPU you want you can add a PCIe SSD and upgrade the graphics card and have a great machine that is vey close to the modern iMac/Mac Pro.

    The iMac is a bad choice if you need ECC memory or you need lots of storage, but it is quiet and has a excellent screen.
     
  3. mpe macrumors regular

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    #3
    In many tasks iMac is noticeably faster thanks to newer gen. higher clocked CPU.

    This is true especially when you need short burst of performance (think photo editing, interactive use, mixed tasks).

    Mac Pro "only" excels at tasks that can effectively use multiple cores (typically minutes+ long batch operations), source code compiling, numerical calculations, video transcoding, etc. And then tasks that can effectively use multi-GPU (probably only FinalCut)
     
  4. mavericks7913 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Well Im thinking to get dual 2.66ghz core 6 cpu for Adobe programs basically. They can take 12 cores but not sure about the CPU's performance.
     
  5. mpe macrumors regular

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    #5
    It depends.

    Premiere for sure.

    Photoshop and Lightroom not so much (except for 3D rendering and a few specific effects in PS).

    In most Adobe tests i7-6700K from iMac beats both 6 and 8-core Mac Pro configuration.
     
  6. mavericks7913 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #6
    Even with the dual version which is 12 cores?
     
  7. mpe macrumors regular

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    #7
    Thats even slower for content creating professional apps use than 6/8-core or the Skylake i7 iMac.
     
  8. MacStu09, Aug 28, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2016

    MacStu09 macrumors regular

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    #8
    Just to clarify, that is entirely wrong. In actual benchmarks, the 12 core is as much as 85% faster in content creating professional apps than the 6-core/8-core counterparts (cMP). In apps like Premiere, blu-ray exports are 40% faster, blender almost 85% faster, AE exports are about 50% faster, and resolve deliver speeds are about 50% faster.

    For example, if you're a heavy logic user, the 12 core mac pro completely outperforms the 6700k, it's not even close. The 6700k iMac caves in at ~110 tracks, the 12 core mac pro can handle ~190. The 12 core Mac Pro classic even came in at 57% faster than the 6700k in AE CC 2014 benchmarks.

    The more accurate statement would be, "dependent upon the app." Because in most popular content creating professional apps (especially video related), the Mac Pro 12 core beats the 6700k. In consumer apps, non-efficient multi-core apps, the iMac will be faster. But then you're also stuck with the low-end M395 graphics card no matter what with the iMac. Once you're used to a card with 6gb+ VRAM, there's really no going back. You'll start finding limits you didn't even realize with 2gb permanently on the iMac's M395.

    Overall, it really all depends on your needs, but for most 3D/video/graphics related apps, the MPc will be able to win in most categories. If you're a jack of all trades, or simply have diverse interests, the Mac Pro is nice, since one computer can cover all of your needs. But for lightroom and photoshop, the iMac will be great.
     
  9. mpe macrumors regular

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    #9
    Yes, there are definitely tasks where 12-core/24 threads or two GPUs can show its muscles. Like those you mentioned.

    Perhaps I shouldn't have mentioned "professional apps" as such. I stand corrected.

    It really depends on the app and more specifically on the task. A rule of thumb is that if something takes several minutes (exporting, rendering,..) it more likely benefits from many threads. However, many tasks aren't like that (and even can't be). That's why modern higher-clocked 4C/8T or 8C/16T can in many tasks beat the older 12core chip.
     
  10. fusionid macrumors member

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    #10
    Source? Do you have a link to the track count mac pro vs. imac?

    thanks
     

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