iMac G3 (about year 2000)

haute@tiscali.c

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 4, 2006
22
0
I have no previous knowledge of Macintosh computers. Have just bought the above computer which is in good working order. I have two Microsoft computers working on a Broadband network through a Netgear router and a Belkin hub. Internet connection if working well on he two Microsoft computers, but I have spent a lot of time trying to get an Internet/email connection on the iMac without success.
First question is: Is it possible.
Second question " how" -I have followed a number guides on various Internet sites but have had no luck.
Can anyone point me in the right direction please?.
I use a pop3 and smtp connections
 

haute@tiscali.c

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 4, 2006
22
0
Thanks for that very prompt response.
I am not wishing to network the MS and Mac computers other than to be able to access the Internet and email independently on the iMac
 

haute@tiscali.c

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 4, 2006
22
0
Broadband iMac G3

Not really. My problem is far more basic - simply getting a connection, although I might progress onto networking them together - something that I had not previously considered possible.
 

haute@tiscali.c

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 4, 2006
22
0
Sorry letters crossed in the post.
It is wired setup. Network is an overstatement because I simply have the two MS computers working independently through a hub. The second MS simply as a backup, both on XP.
The main computer is not used as a Gateway as far as I know.
 

TEG

macrumors 604
Jan 21, 2002
6,572
49
Langley, Washington
Go to the Apple Menu,
Select Control Panels
Select TCP/IP
Select DHCP
Remove any other entries
Restart

That should get you going. Otherwise it may require a little more thought.

TEG
 

MarkCollette

macrumors 68000
Mar 6, 2003
1,558
32
Toronto, Canada
Most broadband connections give you two IP addresses, so if you've connected two computers via a hub, then that's it, there are no more addresses available for your iMac.

Now, if they're connected via a router using NAT, then the router will have an external IP address, visible from the Internet, and your windows computers will have internal private addresses. Probably something like 192.168.0.100. In this case, you should be able to simply plug in your iMac, and in the Network settings tell is to use DHCP, and then it'll just magically work.
 

haute@tiscali.c

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 4, 2006
22
0
Thanks for you assistance.
Following Mark's guidance regarding the limitation of numbers on one router I connected the computer directly to the router to try and eliminate that aspect of the problem.
Then following Tegs guidance



Any further ideas would be welcome.
 

MarkCollette

macrumors 68000
Mar 6, 2003
1,558
32
Toronto, Canada
I think there still might be some confusion as to what a "router" is here. There should be some sort of broadband box that is either a cable modem or an ADSL modem. That box will typically have one single ethernet jack, allowing you to connect it to either a router, switch or hub. The router/switch/hub will typically have 5 ethernet jacks, one for connecting to the broadband box, and the rest for connecting to your computers. In theory, your broadband box could also be a router, all-in-one, but I haven't actually seen any of those in stores.

A hub is basically a dumb splitter, in that all of the ethernet jacks are physically wired together, meaning that each connected computer can interfere with the others, which causes them to have to resend ethernet packets, and thus transmit data slower. A Switch will have some means of buffering ethernet packets, and allowing computers to talk to each other without interfering with others. A router is basically a small computer, complete with a whole TCP/IP stack that can act as a firewall and do NAT, which is the thing that allows you to connect more computers than you have external IP addresses for.

The simplest thing to do is plug in all of your computers into a router, and plug that router into the broadband box. If any one computer can browse web sites, then every other one should work too. That way you can isolate if you've setup your network properly, versus if your Mac itself has a problem.
 

haute@tiscali.c

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 4, 2006
22
0
Thanks for


Sorry to be so basic but I have nothing to compare with. Any further assistance would be gratefully appreciated.
.
 

haute@tiscali.c

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 4, 2006
22
0
PS
I disocover that it becomes confusing because there are combination devices which can combine both an ADSL modem and a router in the one case as well as devices which can combine an ADSL modem, a router and a switch all in the one case.
 

MarkCollette

macrumors 68000
Mar 6, 2003
1,558
32
Toronto, Canada
With some ADSL providers, you have to go through a specific process to switch computers. For example, here in Calgary, a company called Telus requires that you go to a web page to register your MAC addresses. Every ethernet adapter has a unique address called a MAC address. This is how they ensure that you've only got the maximum of two computers connected. Yet another ADSL provider here, called Nucleus, requires you to phone them after you've disconnected the old machine and connecte the new machine, so that they can manually register the MAC addresses.

Some companies will just tell you to use a router so you can hookup as many computers as you want without bothering them, and some won't allow you to do that at all. You should probably phone your ADSL provider and ask what you should do to have your three computers connected. They might try to sell you a third IP address, but make sure to ask about user a router.