iMac questions from a Windows guy

Discussion in 'iMac' started by ehzool, Apr 22, 2014.

  1. ehzool macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2014
    #1
    I've used Windows whole life but would like to get into Macs.

    But there are some PC programs I don't know how I could live without (Like Sony Vegas, an video editing program) I'm sure there are some programs better that are Mac based but I'm just so use to Vegas.

    It's possible to run Bootcamp on the Mac though in order to run my PC program right? Would it be really choppy or not behave the same? Also, would it be easy to install? (I have the program on a disc)

    That's one of my main concerns with buying an iMac.
     
  2. Nuke61 macrumors 6502

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    Jan 18, 2013
    Location:
    Columbia, SC
    #2
    Bootcamp is just like using Windows on the same hardware. All that Windows will know is that it's running on an Intel machine of whatever specs your Mac happens to be. If it would be choppy on a clone running that hardware, it will be choppy on the Bootcamp Mac. Likewise for not choppy. It's nearly identical to running on a clone of equivalent hardware. The reason it's not *exactly* like equivalent hardware is that sometimes the Apple supplied drivers (mostly video) may not be quite up to snuff with the best Windows drivers available.

    You may come to a different conclusion, depending on how extensively you use the Vegas functions, but I was/am still satisfied with iMovie such that I never bothered to go back to Windows NLE software.
     
  3. Macforcollege macrumors member

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    Jul 7, 2013
    #3
    I had used Sony Vegas until I converted to Mac this year. I would say Final Cut Pro X is just as good if not better. If you are willing to take the time to adapt to the new software, the rewards of owning a shiny new mac outweigh the negatives of converting.
     
  4. Fatboy71 macrumors 65816

    Fatboy71

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2010
    Location:
    UK
    #4
    I was in your position around 15 months ago, i.e. used Windows for over 10 years. What I learnt was to do as much as you can on the Mac, after all, that is why you are wanting a Mac, to move away from Windows. Not much point getting a Mac and then spending a lot of the time running Windows programs on it :)

    Although I’ve never used the Sony Vegas video editing application, I do use Final Cut Pro. I am far from been an expert on it, but I would be very surprised if you couldn’t do everything you do with Sony Vegas with Final Cut Pro.

    There’s loads of good video guides around on Final Cut Pro, which are a wealth of knowledge. I’ve watched a lot of them and they have helped me out massively with stuff that I’ve been trying to do.
     
  5. laserfan macrumors member

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    Jul 13, 2012
    #5
    The OP didn't mention Blu-ray, but I use Sony Vegas for making BD disks. Does Final Cut Pro do BD?
     
  6. Fatboy71 macrumors 65816

    Fatboy71

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    Dec 21, 2010
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    UK
    #6
    You can make Blu Ray disks with Final Cut Pro X. You go into Preferences then Destination and choose Blu Ray from the list of destinations shown.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. sgtbob macrumors regular

    sgtbob

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2008
    Location:
    Kansas
    #7
    PC vs MAC

    I had some issues with weaning my self from PC's when I bought my iMAC about 7 years ago. I tried the Bootcamp feature and even installed Fusion - as well as another virtual system - to run Windows based programs. Eventually, I found that most Windows based programs are available in the MAC world and evolved to where I removed all the virtual systems and rely only on my iMAC - now running Mavericks OSX 10.9.2 and and quite happy with the service. I find that the constant tweaking I had to do with PC units to be a royal pain - which I have not encountered in MAC. It does take some self-education, but once on board, I would never go back.:)
     
  8. joe-h2o macrumors 6502a

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    Jun 24, 2012
    #8
    Who uses the Apple-supplied video drivers under Windows?!

    Just install the latest ones from your vendor of choice (AMD or Nvidia) exactly as you would on a "normal" windows box.
     
  9. laserfan macrumors member

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    Jul 13, 2012
    #9
    I was basically drummed out of the Apple corps back in the mid/late-1990s at my Fortune 100 company. Was squeezed real hard to get into Windows full-time. I can vaguely recall that I'd become somewhat disenchanted with my Macs anyway--something about "system extensions" not loading reliably and that was irritating.

    I'm long-since retired, recently got an old Mac running again, and when a certain PC I am using right now goes t*ts-up I want to replace it with a top-of-the-line iMac 27" or whatever is biggest.

    Or maybe I'll break down and get one next week!

    :)
     
  10. Nuke61 macrumors 6502

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    Jan 18, 2013
    Location:
    Columbia, SC
    #10
    If I wanted to do the driver update hassle by figuring out exactly what hardware I have and going to individual mfr. websites, I would have just continued to use generic Windows boxes. For that very reason, I suspect that most people who use Bootcamp use the Apple supplied drivers.
     
  11. BayouTiger macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Location:
    New Orleans
    #11
    Unfortunately I have to use lots of job specific apps which have no Mac equals. Add that some others are just shoddy compared to their Windows versions (Autocad LT). I have used Parallels early and then Fusion for the last several years. Unfortunately, for whatever reasons virtualization worked better for me back a few years ago. I think feature bloat has gotten in the way and I am either going to go to Boot Camp or to an ultrabook for the field while keeping my Mac desktops.
     
  12. joema2 macrumors 65816

    joema2

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    Sep 3, 2013
    #12
    You can run Sony Vegas via Bootcamp or under OS X using VMWare or Parallels. I don't know if there's a significant performance hit, but I've seen people running Vegas that way on Mac OS X. You can Google VMWare + Sony Vegas, etc, and maybe find someone with first hand experience willing to give more details.

    Most major app categories are available on Windows. Many specialized utilities have an approximate Mac OS X equivalent. E.g, the best file/folder comparison utility is Beyond Compare, which is currently in open beta on Mac OS X. Sometimes there are "best of breed" utilities like TreeSize Pro which just aren't available on Mac OS X, but there are always alternatives.

    Within corporations, highly job-specific "vertical" apps tend to be Windows only.

    OTOH -- as app deployment has shifted from native executables to Web-based, this somewhat diminishes the importance of an OS-specific app. Increasingly companies are using web apps for internal use, not a native app which must be installed.

    Unfortunately Vegas is not currently available natively for Mac OS X, although there have been rumors they might do a port.

    FCP X is an excellent program, and relatively inexpensive with liberal licensing policies. However it is different from a normal timeline-oriented editor like Premiere Pro, Avid or Vegas. I came from Premiere Pro and it took a while before I was comfortable on FCP. X does a lot more for you regarding metadata, keyword tagging, clip ranking, etc.

    Many long-time pre-Windows 8 users find OS X more "windows like" and familiar than Windows 8. With OS X the paradigm of overlapping windows is uniformly supported and updated with new version, including fresh UI elements. It hasn't been "kicked to the curb" in favor of a radically different UI.
     
  13. Nyy8 macrumors 6502a

    Nyy8

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    Jun 12, 2011
    Location:
    New England
    #13
    Being honest, I didn't even know you could use your own drivers. But it stills seem like a huge hassle. If it gave a shocking performance boost I might hunt down all the drivers. Like you said, it's just too much of a hassle.
     
  14. Fatboy71 macrumors 65816

    Fatboy71

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2010
    Location:
    UK
    #14
    I have Parallels Desktop on my Mac. But this is for some CD roms that my partner has for her card making, these only run with Windows. Myself, I found that any programs I used on Windows, I have either been able to find a Mac version or an application that does the same thing.

    I found like you that most programs for Windows are available in a Mac version. Or failing that, you will find an application on Mac which does the same job. For example, I used to use Nero (on Windows) to burn stuff to disk. Nero isn't available on Mac but an application called Toast Titanium is, which does the same job as Nero, and if I'm honest, I prefer it to Nero.

    I've been using Mac now for around 15 months, and yes in the beginning Mac is a little different in some respects, but in others its similar to Windows. I spent a few months, researching and asking questions on various forums, prior to getting my Mac. After 15 months of using a Mac, theres is no way now that I would go back to Windows. This is the opinion of every Mac user I have spoked to as well :)
     
  15. comatory macrumors 6502a

    comatory

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    #15
    As for NLE:

    I edit video proffesionally and while Vegas is not necessarily bad, I consider it worst to work with. I've worked with Premiere, Avid, Final Cut and few more... Final Cut Pro 7 is my favorite for its speed and UI, Premiere is on second spot because you can import almost anything directly, plus Adobe seems to embrace new technologies (unlike Avid).

    It is really a matter of preference and experience. I know the feeling when a person is adapted to one piece of software and really productive with it... but in your case I'd start from scratch - new OS (X), new video editor (iMovie, Final Cut X). Vegas isn't that good to stick with it, once you discover new workflow methods, you might reconsider.

    If you edit videos regularly you should consider Final Cut Pro X, it has richer set of features and you can try the demo for free for one month I believe. You can't beat the price also (unless you're willing to shell monthly for CC subscription from Adobe).
     
  16. Choctaw macrumors 6502

    Choctaw

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2008
    #16
    Some points you might consider about using Boot Camp so your PC programs will work thru Windows. I chose not to use it. Running windows means that part of your system is open to the viruses and spyware of the Windows world. So you will need Windows antivirus software. You will need a copy of Windows, 10 gigs of free disk space, a wired keyboard & mouse to do the installation process, you can't install Windows on an external drive, This info came from a OS X book called Mountain Lion the missing manual. The books chapter on using Windows on a Mac say's it can be done but only in a special setup. To paraphrase some words from that chapter, "A Cult type Mac person would comment, Who on earth, wants to pollute the magnificence of the Mac with a headache like Windows, after all people buy a Mac to rid themselves from being slaves to Ms.

    I for one agree after using PC's since 1984 and dealing with all the upgrades that I felt were unloaded without much care as to how safe things would work. They always seemed to take away something I used and liked, and replace it with things I really did not need or use. So about a year ago I got me a iMac. Kept the other PC's on my network, but my iMac has been a great pleasure to enjoy and slowly learn it's functionality. I probably know less about a Mac than most of the posters on this forum. But each day I turn it on, search things out, ask questions, and enjoy life with my Mac.
     
  17. joe-h2o macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2012
    #17
    All of the main drivers are included - including the video drivers - but the video drivers are an exception, and there's no "hassle". You just install Nvidia's or AMD's drivers and away you go. The performance boost is *significant* under Windows, especially if you have more recent GPU hardware.

    All of the other drivers you can leave alone, and the fact that they are all rolled up into the boot camp package makes installing them easy and trouble free since you know they'll work with your machine.

    The "hassle" is as difficult as typing nvidia.com into your web browser of choice and clicking "download geforce driver". It's similarly easy for AMD cards.

    ----------

    It's no hassle at all, and it is a big performance benefit - especially Nvidia drivers.

    You don't need to mess with any of the other hardware drivers (sound, wifi etc), but there are advantages to keeping your GPU driver up to date, especially if you are going to do heavy lifting with the GPU (games, apps that use CUDA, etc).
     
  18. Nuke61 macrumors 6502

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    Jan 18, 2013
    Location:
    Columbia, SC
    #18

    I suspect that most don't do that, primarily because Apple doesn't mention it in their Bootcamp articles.
     

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