iMac vs MacBook (in other words, do I really need a notebook?)

miles01110

macrumors Core
Jul 24, 2006
19,269
30
The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
zimtheinvader said:
You cannot take graphic notes on the MB, so you will either need a notebook or Tablet PC for some classes like chemistry, physics, ect to take really good notes anyway, without some similar fix...
I disagree. While I don't usually take notes on my computer during class, LaTeX editors are more than adequate for this particular task. IMO, there's no point in taking notes with a laptop. Most people can write much faster than they type- they also have full control over formatting their notes as they want.

if it's really important they can type it up later on their computer, which as someone mentioned is really good for studying.

For myself, it's important that I switch computers as little as possible between school work, work work, and home. Unfortunately they all sort of blend together at the moment :) The portability of my MBP means I don't have to email myself files or use a jump drive when commuting between home, various educational institutions I collaborate with, or CERN in Europe (although damn Heathrow/England for making it impossible to take it on the plane!).
 

ddrueckhammer

macrumors 65816
Aug 8, 2004
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America's Wang
miles01110 said:
I disagree. While I don't usually take notes on my computer during class, LaTeX editors are more than adequate for this particular task. IMO, there's no point in taking notes with a laptop. Most people can write much faster than they type- they also have full control over formatting their notes as they want.
I don't know if I see where you are coming from. Since when does LaTeX help you draw pictures and graphs easily and quickly? Also, what is so bad about carrying a jump drive or iPod Shuffle even. It is much better than lugging around a 5lb laptop IMO...
 

sierra oscar

macrumors 6502
Apr 23, 2006
254
1
South Australia, Australia
miles01110 said:
...IMO, there's no point in taking notes with a laptop. Most people can write much faster than they type- they also have full control over formatting their notes as they want.
if it's really important they can type it up later on their computer, which as someone mentioned is really good for studying...
I do disagree with you - that most ppl can write faster than they can type - it's not humanly possible to form letters well at 45+ wpm if you write by hand. However if you are referring to the fact that maybe there are some ppl out there that can't touch type - then I agree - but I've not seen anyone in the last few years who was in this category (that use computers in this way anyway).

I also feel as I've spent most of my life at uni, both tutoring and studying that re-typing lecture notes is actually not very efficient. Time is better spent actually really reading the notes more than the physical exercise of typing AND reading copious notes ....

I appreciate your views though - and my opinion(s) are shaped by my prof area - so perhaps this really depends on ones subject area.
 

Xenesis

macrumors regular
Sep 3, 2006
197
0
Australia
Hmm...

Being a Chemistry Major at University for 2 years, there's not really any reason for me to use a Laptop at University. I used one for high school work, and that was a blast.

But it just didn't work for me at Uni. It was far, far easier to scribble in an exercise book. It'd take me ages to draw science diagrams for everything and the like.

I'm personally in the market for a new mac, and I'm getting an iMac simply because my iBook G3 spent most of it's time sitting on my desk, or next to my bed when I used it once I left school.

I wouldn't recommend a laptop for science courses, but it's still up to you at the end of the day.
 

Maxiseller

macrumors 6502a
Jan 11, 2005
846
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Little grey, chilly island.
I have to admit that I don't use a laptop for writing down lecture notes although I am faster at typing - but I usually take my laptop to uni with me if not for anything else but to hop on the wireless networks, catch up with my own personal business or work on essays for uni while I'm sitting in the cafeteria or something.

I find mine indespensible!
 

miles01110

macrumors Core
Jul 24, 2006
19,269
30
The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
ddrueckhammer said:
I don't know if I see where you are coming from. Since when does LaTeX help you draw pictures and graphs easily and quickly?
I can draw graphs in Mathematica and import them, it's much simpler that way. If pressed, drawing diagrams in LaTeX takes 30 seconds. If the drawing is complex, it takes 1 minute.

You should learn LaTeX anyways if you plan to go into any type of science in which you will have to publish in order to get a job or PhD. If this is not required, then you shouldn't be considered a scientist...but that's another debate.

ddrueckhammer said:
Also, what is so bad about carrying a jump drive or iPod Shuffle even. It is much better than lugging around a 5lb laptop IMO...
wtf? Can you take notes on a jump drive or an iPod Shuffle? I fail to see the point in this statement.


I do disagree with you - that most ppl can write faster than they can type - it's not humanly possible to form letters well at 45+ wpm if you write by hand.
...which is why you rewrite them.


[/quote]I also feel as I've spent most of my life at uni, both tutoring and studying that re-typing lecture notes is actually not very efficient. Time is better spent actually really reading the notes more than the physical exercise of typing AND reading copious notes ....[/QUOTE]

Actually, it's widely accepted that reading from notes or a book has the lowest content retention rate of various methods of studying...beaten only by not studying at all.
 

sierra oscar

macrumors 6502
Apr 23, 2006
254
1
South Australia, Australia
miles01110 said:
Actually, it's widely accepted that reading from notes or a book has the lowest content retention rate of various methods of studying...beaten only by not studying at all.
I disagree - it depends on your research area and the content in question and the individual - a positivist would disagree I guess - and you have, which is fine. Things just aren't that black and white for me - I do know that students who type their notes (or rewrite their notes) as a way of absorbing their work - do not achieve as much - timewise and they tend to not grasp concepts as they are just ROTE learning things - and that's not the idea of higher education, building knowledge and theory.

miles01110 said:
You should learn LaTeX anyways if you plan to go into any type of science in which you will have to publish in order to get a job or PhD. If this is not required, then you shouldn't be considered a scientist...but that's another debate.
I don't also don't think a researcher's credibility - whether social scientist or scientist - be measured by one's ability to know LaTex or other tool. Sure it helps - but we've all only just started to use some of these tools in the last 25 years or so - and I don't think ppl have become 'smarter' in real terms b/c of it. Maybe more productive...