iMac w/ gigs of RAM enough for Logic Studio?

Discussion in 'Digital Audio' started by Cycom, Sep 23, 2007.

  1. Cycom macrumors 6502

    Cycom

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #1
    Would a 2.16 iMac with 3 gigs of ram be sufficient for Logic Studio? I would be controlling 3 midi keyboards, and perhaps 4-5 software instruments. Let me know if you need more info.
     
  2. OldCorpse macrumors 65816

    OldCorpse

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    #2
    Well, as you know, when it comes to audio and RAM, the more the merrier. However, I'd say 3GB should be plenty for what you've indicated. Depends a bit on the instruments, but I'd say you're safe. Even 2GB should do it.
     
  3. Cycom thread starter macrumors 6502

    Cycom

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #3
    Thanks for the reply, oldcorpse. How many audio tracks could I realistically get going at the same time on L8 with my specs?

    Regarding the software instruments, they'd all either be Native Instruments (FM8 and Absynth 4), Arturia (CS-80v), Spectrasonics (Atmosphere), and the bundled Logic instruments (the drum machine and perhaps the sampler).
     
  4. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #4
    It's really impossible to say. The number of tracks, the number of plug in effects you have enabled, the number of software instruments, and the makes and models of all of the above mutually affect the capacity of the machine. You have a certain number of CPU cycles to divvy up between all of those processes.

    Your machine is close to the fastest you can get short of a MacPro, so if you overflow its capacity, either you are using the software at a professional level (in which case you need to spend $$$ on a MacPro and associated drives, PCI-e hardware plug in acccelerators, etc) or you need to rethink how you are structuring your software and your expectations.

    For example, driving a MIDI keyboard or hardware synth is trivial for the machine -- and way less costly in CPU cycles than a software based instrument.
     
  5. OldCorpse macrumors 65816

    OldCorpse

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    Dec 7, 2005
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    #5
    Actually, it does make a difference. Some apps for example are more efficient than others. In general, Logic is pretty efficient in resource usage, and DP for example is generally thought of as less efficient. Arturia and Spectrasnonics are not too demanding on an individual basis, and with NI depends. The more software instruments, the more taxing it is, at which point you need to limit your tracks, and the other way around. If you use a moderate amount of instruments, you can get up to quite a few tracks. Also depends on what you want to do - real time playback editing will obviously be more taxing, if you do it piecemeal, it'll be easier. Unless you are doing orchestral work though, you can pretty much work around any hardware limitations with the setup you're getting.
     
  6. joelw87 macrumors member

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    Aug 9, 2007
  7. Plumbstone macrumors regular

    Plumbstone

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    #7
    You could run loads on that machine. Probably around 40+ stereo audio tracks as these just stream from your hard drive and are not very CPU intensive. As for soft-synths if you only want to run 3-4 you shouldn't have a problem especially with romplers like Atmosphere. The CS-80v on the other hand is a real CPU hog but you should be able to run some. External MIDI is dead easy, I used to run a whole studio with an Atari.

    As has been pointed out, plug-in wise, it does depend on what you want to use but as you can freeze tracks and export tracks to audio with a single click you will definitely be able to make music. The new iMacs even have Firewire 800 so get yourself an external drive for even more performance.
     

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