iPad Pro Improvements with non Apple styli

Discussion in 'iPad' started by dalcorn1, Nov 18, 2015.

  1. dalcorn1 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    #1
    Has anyone using a Pencil by fifty three or Adonit styli (or anything else for that matter) noticed improvements on the iPad. I'm curious to know if the palm rejection has improved, as that seems to be handled by the screen refreshing so often (260 a second?) rather than the pencil itself, which would suggest to me all drawing tools should feel the benefit.
     
  2. Game64 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2011
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    #2
    You are correct. a Pencil by FiftyThree does have palm rejection from the screen.
     
  3. Ledgem macrumors 65816

    Ledgem

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hawaii, USA
    #3
    Palm rejection on the iPad Pro is handled by different sensing technologies. Your finger triggers a capacitive digitizer, which until the iPad Pro was the only type of sensing that Apple built into their touch-screen devices. The iPad Pro is the only device to include an active digitizer, as well. When the Pencil is near the screen, the iPad seems to disregard capacitive input - at least, around the region where the pencil is active - to create palm rejection.

    I can't say whether the refresh rates would offer anything to other styluses, but I wouldn't expect others to perform as well as the Pencil (or other active styluses, whenever they're released) due to the differences in the technology used.
     
  4. xraydoc macrumors demi-god

    xraydoc

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    Oct 9, 2005
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    192.168.1.1
    #4
    Zero change with passive styli like the usual rubber tipped ones in apps like Notes and OneNote.
     
  5. dalcorn1 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2008
    #5
    So I got my iPad pro today so have been able to try this out.

    There isn't much change in terms of pencil by 53, other than that because the screen is so much bigger the accuracy has improved dramatically. It means in some apps where the palm rejection essentially disables touch, which can be a problem if you want to zoom, it doesn't matter too much because you don't really need to zoom.

    The adonit on the other hand feels horrible, the stroke doesn't seem very responsive to pressure and it feels like it's scratching across the screen. I've stopped using that now, I'll use pencil until my apple pencil arrives in December.
     
  6. Game64 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2011
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    #6
    This is actually inaccurate. The iPad Pro has a totally different type of palm rejection than other tablets. What you described is how the Surface Pro does palm rejection. The iPad pro does pom rejection in the capacitive layer. You can literally rest your palm on the iPad Pro and then use a finger like a stylus and it will work the same way.

    This is honestly what makes the iPad Pro great and what makes the palm rejection the best in class. No longer does the screen have to rely on the pen to communicate palm rejection. The screen just does it. Which is amazing.
     

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