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hajime

macrumors 604
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
6,947
998
Hi, with several companies offering BF deals, I want to buy some non-Apple software. I know buying direct from developers could support them more and plugins will also work better (in the case of Affinity programs) but there could also be higher security risk and less convenience than buying via the Apple App Store. In general, which is a better route?
 

Partron22

macrumors 68030
Apr 13, 2011
2,655
800
Yes
I am usually happier going to the Dev. You get more features, and don't have to worry about Apple throwing a hissy and removing your apps from their walled garden. If you haven't noticed, there's a revolt going on right now about Apples store fees and draconian action with regard to Apple's store policies. Even cutting their app tax to 15%, I'm not about to involve myself in their enforced in app purchases and mandatory updates. Slavery doee not appeal to me. Enforced buying of a new Mac every year is also pretty onerous.
 

Jessica Lares

macrumors G3
Oct 31, 2009
9,492
937
Near Dallas, Texas, USA
I only use the MAS for apps with iOS counterparts.

Why are you concerned about security issues and the inconvenience of installing an app from a developers website, yet don't feel the same way about a plugin which suffers the same issues?
 
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hajime

macrumors 604
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
6,947
998
I only use the MAS for apps with iOS counterparts.

Why are you concerned about security issues and the inconvenience of installing an app from a developers website, yet don't feel the same way about a plugin which suffers the same issues?

That is a good point! Thanks for raising this issue.
 

James_C

macrumors 68030
Sep 13, 2002
2,694
1,528
Bristol, UK
MAS Pro's

1. Greater APP security as it has been vetted by Apple.
2. Greater credit card security as you don't have to give your card details to another 3rd party.
3. Automatic software updates.
4. You are able to install on multiple Macs.
5. You may also be able to share via Family Sharing if the developer allows.
6. Ease of doing a clean install on a new Mac, rather than downloading and entering passcode data on multiple websites.

MAS Con's

1. Due to Sandboxing and Apple's App Store submission guidelines you may not get the same level of functionality as buying direct from the developer.
2. The developer may not make as much money due to Apple's commission charges.
3. MAS does not offer Beta versions. For example if you buy MS 365 from the App Store you will not be able to take advantage of Fast Insider Beta that allows Office Apps to run natively on Apple Silicon at this time.
4. Due to delays in getting updates approved by Apple, you may get updates slightly later than if you purchased direct from the developer.
5. Generally getting upgrade pricing is more difficult through the MAS, although some developers have found creative ways around this.
 

yurc

macrumors 6502a
Aug 12, 2016
814
971
inside your DSDT
Most of answer is already answered, but my choice usually end like :

I bought directly, if :
  • Developer terms transparent and allows me to install on multiple Macs as long I am just the user (Acorn, Radio Silence). I had bunches of Macs, mostly desktop, so I prefer if they installed without broke licensing terms.
  • Apps needs additional access and filesystem which usually restricted by sandboxing (USB overdrive, iStats Menu, Bartender, Mac Fans Control, VMware Fusion, Little Snitch etc)
  • If apps need additional plugin or extra extension (DaVinci Resolve). Previously my Resolve installs from MAS was never good, cannot load footage, encountered unknown behavior...etc. Direct download version was working without hiccup! Direct download version is also installing additional utility like panel setup, project server and RAW player. On MAS version they were absent.
  • Not available on MAS (Adobe CC)

I bought from App Store, if :
  • Stock license is just for two computers, with MAS i am allowed at least installed on 5 computers (Pixave, Affinity Designer)
  • Rarely used apps, or usually lightweight utility (Pomodoro timer, Disk Diag, etc)
  • Sometimes Apple discount them
ps : those are my own purchase history, looking from list above, I gravitate towards buying directly because mostly of them is restricted by sandboxing
 

dwfaust

macrumors 604
Jul 3, 2011
7,856
9,824
The one issue that I have run into is the number of installs. I have a family of 6 Macs, and the MAS version typically lets you install the app on 5 computers, regardless of who uses the computer. The copy purchased from the developer often has different restrictions - some will allow you to install it on 5 computers, some only on 2 computers, etc. Others will allow you to install it on as many computers as you desire, so long as you, the licensee, is the primary user on all of the computers.

In many cases, the MAS version will have sandboxing features that the developer sourced version will not. Sometimes you can work around the sandboxing limitations by giving permission to various functionality, and sometimes, you cannot.

The pricing may also vary between the MAS and developer sourced versions... the developer may offer discounts or "sale" prices from time to time, and whatever you pay the developer for the version direct from him/her/them goes to them. For the MAS version, Apple gets its cut.

As always, YMMV.
 

hajime

macrumors 604
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
6,947
998
The one issue that I have run into is the number of installs. I have a family of 6 Macs, and the MAS version typically lets you install the app on 5 computers, regardless of who uses the computer. The copy purchased from the developer often has different restrictions - some will allow you to install it on 5 computers, some only on 2 computers, etc. Others will allow you to install it on as many computers as you desire, so long as you, the licensee, is the primary user on all of the computers.

In many cases, the MAS version will have sandboxing features that the developer sourced version will not. Sometimes you can work around the sandboxing limitations by giving permission to various functionality, and sometimes, you cannot.

The pricing may also vary between the MAS and developer sourced versions... the developer may offer discounts or "sale" prices from time to time, and whatever you pay the developer for the version direct from him/her/them goes to them. For the MAS version, Apple gets its cut.

As always, YMMV.

By installing on 5 computers, so even you only use it on one of these five computers you cannot install and run it on the 6th computer when the other four are not running it at the same time?
 

dwfaust

macrumors 604
Jul 3, 2011
7,856
9,824
By installing on 5 computers, so even you only use it on one of these five computers you cannot install and run it on the 6th computer when the other four are not running it at the same time?

If you are talking about the MAS version, no. It limits the number of installs.

By comparison many non-MAS software apps have different rules. Adobe Photoshop, for example, allows you to activate and de-activate installs. They limit you to two active installs, but you can have it installed on more devices. In order to activate it and use it on the third device, you must deactivate one of the other installs, but you can leave the software installed.

The MAS store will not allow you to install it on the 6th device. You have to uninstall it somewhere first. One could argue that the difference is that the MAS version of a piece of software is always activated and ready to go.
 
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hajime

macrumors 604
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
6,947
998
If you are talking about the MAS version, no. It limits the number of installs.

By comparison many non-MAS software apps have different rules. Adobe Photoshop, for example, allows you to activate and de-activate installs. They limit you to two active installs, but you can have it installed on more devices. In order to activate it and use it on the third device, you must deactivate one of the other installs, but you can leave the software installed.

The MAS store will no allow you to install it on the 6th device. You have to uninstall it somewhere first. One could argue that the difference is that the MAS version of a piece of software is always activated and ready to go.

Thanks for your info.
 
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