Increased Switcher Rate From Android to iPhone Appears Focused Outside the U.S.

Discussion in 'iOS Blog Discussion' started by MacRumors, Jan 29, 2015.

  1. MacRumors macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    Following Apple's earnings call on Tuesday in which Tim Cook stated the company "saw more new customers to iPhone than we've ever seen before," research firm Consumer Intelligence Research Partners (CIRP) today released (via Fortune) a report delving into the specifics of the Android-to-Apple switching statistics revealed by Apple.

    Expectedly, the report - which surveyed 500 Apple device customers inside the U.S. only - notes most Apple iPhone users returned to the company with the newest iteration of the iPhone last year. But the rate of Android switchers migrating platforms to the iPhone 6 or 6 Plus wasn't much changed.

    [​IMG]
    CIRP notes that the rate of Android switchers has "varied seasonally, yet remained relatively consistent," and this quarter's U.S. numbers have the firm speculating the biggest rate of Android-to-Apple switching occurred outside of the U.S.
    Given Apple's strong position in the smartphone market in the U.S., where there is a strong base of iPhone-to-iPhone upgrades and fewer from Android-to-iPhone, CIRP's report probably isn't too far off from fact. Apple's smaller presence in emerging markets like China, where it has been seeing very strong growth thanks to a few notable partnerships and store openings in the country has likely fueled some overseas brand switching among previously loyal Android users.

    Article Link: Increased Switcher Rate From Android to iPhone Appears Focused Outside the U.S.
     
  2. CFreymarc Suspended

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    #2
    Hence, overseas customers are getting sophisticated and can judge quality.
     
  3. ghost187 macrumors 6502a

    ghost187

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    Wow, 500 = sample size, how accurate could that be?
     
  4. 2457282 Suspended

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    This is a small sample size and only US based, so probably not accurate enough to place significant meaning. However, these are percentages of a total. Since the total is growing (aka 74 million in the last quarter), the 20% conversion of Android would represent 14 million Androids flipping. It would also mean 60 million previous iphone users upgrading. Huge numbers no matter what.

    But as I stated, not sure if the small sample size can be trusted.
     
  5. ikramerica, Jan 29, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2015

    ikramerica macrumors 6502

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    The problem for Android is also the reason it's dominant. You can install it on crap hardware and it will be buggy and slow and features won't work right. So you end up with customers blaming Android not the crap phone they chose, and switching to Apple when they can afford it as a result rather than buying a better a Android phone to solve the problem.

    There are many more crap hardware and knockoff options worldwide that aren't sold in the USA, where there aren't many "entry level" smartphone sales.
     
  6. JGIGS macrumors 65816

    JGIGS

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    I switched back to an iphone from a Nexus 5 because I had the opportunity to get a really good price on the iphone (black friday + employee discount).

    Though an iphone is easier to pick up and learn I found pure android more a more efficient operating system to use with more customization. Still better with notifications, I like being able to place icons where I want and not have to have them auto arrange top to bottom of a page. Bottom back arrow key makes navigating easier. Clock weather widgets are nice to have on the springboard, hiding icons you don't use very often in an app drawer is cleaner, you can customize the look with launchers, it's more open.

    I find as apple has added features they have done it a little less efficiently.

    Unless ios or the next iphone model has something super amazing I'll probably go back to android when I'm due for my next upgrade.
     
  7. ikramerica macrumors 6502

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    Agree with most points. Apple is locked into a paradigm that isn't efficient.

    You can hide apps in folders though, as well as on another screen. What's the difference between that and a file drawer?
     
  8. macfacts macrumors 68030

    macfacts

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    It is a survey, not a cenuses. Suveys can be accurate even if the sample size seems small to you, if you do it properly. Statistics are a valid form of evidence in many courts in the world.
     
  9. stewy macrumors regular

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    Or... North Americans are realizing that there are other quality phones besides the iPhone and opting not to switch.
     
  10. Mike MA macrumors 68000

    Mike MA

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    Meh :D But serious, it's a statement from Tim that we never can really validate and though can also be part of a political or strategic move. Stock exchanges and analysts love such quotes.
     
  11. johncarync macrumors regular

    johncarync

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    How many switch from iPhone to Android?

    I can't find any statistics on how many iPhone users switch to Android. If you Google "Switch from iPhone to Android" it shows results on HOW to do it. When you add the word "percent," then all the results change to how many Android users are switching to iPhone. I'm guessing not many iPhone users switch. If anyone has a reliable source, please share.
     
  12. JGIGS, Jan 29, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2015

    JGIGS macrumors 65816

    JGIGS

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    That's what I do. Again the drawer is just cleaner and you can sort the drawer which I kept alphabetical which made it easy to find an app I rarely used. iOs still needs a huge overhaul in my opinion. iOs 7 was really mostly a theme update like a winterboard theme and ios 8 some added some catch up features.

    I guess I'll give ios some props for iMessage. It's features make it my favourite messaging app other than it would be nice if it was on multi platforms since I can't force people to own iphones. I also like the fairly simple and quick photo taking camera.
     
  13. ikramerica, Jan 29, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2015

    ikramerica macrumors 6502

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    Mac OS has had the ability to keep things sorted by name since the mid 80s. You'd think iOS in 2015 can have a "view options" for folders. The UI is so wasteful of space as it is, there is plenty of room for a gear or 3 horz lines icon to tap to set view options in folders and on home screens.
     
  14. KdParker macrumors 601

    KdParker

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    I keep hearing about this stuff regarding customization with android, and the example are all around folders and directories.

    Are folder/directories really that important?
     
  15. Shaun, UK Suspended

    Shaun, UK

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    Why are the analysts so surprised. We all said that once Apple launched larger iPhones the competition would struggle. The iPhone is so much easier to use.
     
  16. the-msa macrumors 6502

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    Well on iOS you are forced to have all apps on the home screen. Even if it's in a folder, it's still somewhere on the home screen or one of the home screens. It's incredibly inelegant. On android you have everything in the so drawer, the home screen only has on it what you want. It's easier to have a clean looking and organised home screen setup on android.

    But hey, since it's android, you can have an ios home screen on it. Including the fitting app icons and all the animations.
     
  17. KdParker macrumors 601

    KdParker

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    So...all the customization is only about 'drawers' ( hidden directories)?
     
  18. the-msa macrumors 6502

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    No. You can literally change or customise anything on android, at least if you install a custom rom. Like anything regarding the UI, built in software features and down to the kernel which allows for hardware tweaks like over or underclocking the CPU or over or undervolting it. OEM versions/phones are usually locked down, some more (Samsung), some less (nexus)
     
  19. mac1984user macrumors 6502a

    mac1984user

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    Wow. LOL. You're not doing your compatriots (e.g. me) any favors with comments like that.

    Anyway, it's not surprising that this stat applies to areas outside the US where Android adoption is quite high. I wouldn't be surprised if some of that switching was happening in Europe as well. Android remains a popular platform, presumably because the ability to operate with SIM-only plans or pay-as-you-go makes the buy-in for lower-cost smartphones an affordable option for many people. The larger-screened iPhones may have incentivised some people to head over to the other side. The story in the US might have been similar if phone contacts weren't as restrictive or costly. Maybe that will change given the recent efforts of T-mobile (etc) to move away from the previous contractual models. We'll see.
     
  20. KdParker macrumors 601

    KdParker

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    Which most normal users will not do. This whole customization thing really only apply's to developers or very very savvy end users.
     
  21. jlrcmba14 macrumors newbie

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    If there's anything about the default configuration of iOS you don't like, you will probably have little ability to change that. I switched to Android because more and more things on iOS irked me and I couldn't do anything about it. At the time, Apple's hardware was falling behind as well (around the time of i5 release). I watch closely because there are things I like about iOS - I'm dying for the easy ability to text from my Mac OS - but it is still far too limited for my purposes.

    There are negatives on both platforms, it's just a matter of which affect you. I think some of the time, there are iOS users who would never switch back if they used Android, but they don't use Android. And that's okay. That means they're happy with their current platform, which is the point of the whole buying process.

    ----------

    I think you really underestimate the different sorts of customizations that are possible and that would interest non-developers. My spouse became enamored with Android when she found out she could customize the look of the icons to look the way she felt was pretty for the moment. She couldn't be less interested in development or know any less about it.
     
  22. KdParker macrumors 601

    KdParker

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    No I don't, You only mentioned minor changes to icons which is hardly any great customization. imho
     
  23. the-msa macrumors 6502

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    its already more than iOS will allow you to ever do. installing a custom launcher and custom icon packs doesnt need root, as opposed to the need of jailbreak to do these trivial things on iOS. want windows 8 interface? download it. want iOS interface? download it.

    although i think you can change app icons in ios?! not sure. anyway its a simple download from the app store in android and you're set.
     
  24. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

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  25. Mockenrue macrumors 6502

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    Exactly. I used to work for a company that did statistical research. Sample sizes are chosen because that's the point where increasing it makes no material change. You'd be amazed at how small they can be. Pro-Apple reports quoted here also rely on them!

    I'd be interested to see the inverse graph: what percentage of Android users previously had an iOS phone? In my very NON-scientific observation, a lot of people are moving in both directions. More than I'd expect.
     

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