Inquiry regarding Mac OS Extended (Journaled, Encrypted)

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by MacBookWhooo, Apr 15, 2014.

  1. MacBookWhooo macrumors newbie

    MacBookWhooo

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2014
    Location:
    Philippines
    #1
    Hello,

    I'm a new Mac user. I had my first ever computer (MacBook Pro) last April 11, 2014 or April 12, 3014. Seriously, it's awesome. I am still adjusting specially when uninstalling applications but I'm getting used to it since most apps does not have an uninstaller.

    Anyway, I have this 1TB external hard drive. And by default the format is in NTFS. I'm not getting the entire 1TB. When I formatted it to Mac OS Extended (Journaled) I was so amazed. I am getting the entire 1TB. I even plugged it on my Windows 8 computer. It worked great. Now, I am thinking of using Mac OS Extended (Journaled, Encrypted). So whenever I plug it to my Mac, it will ask for the password of the hard drive right? Do you think the same thing will happen on Windows 8 whenever I use it there?

    Now, what if the computer that I used to format the hard drive, let's say there's a new OS X and I decided to do a fresh installation of the OS. Do you think it can still read my external hard drive that is formatted to Encrypted Journaled?


    Thanks.
     
  2. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #2
    Correct.

    Nope... Windows will not be able to read that OS X encrypted disk.

    Yes, it will still work with a fresh install or OS X upgrade.
     
  3. MacBookWhooo thread starter macrumors newbie

    MacBookWhooo

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2014
    Location:
    Philippines
    #3
    Oh, another thing. Is there a way to install Mavericks without connecting to the Internet? And I heard, that when you install Mavericks, it downloads the latest updates already so technically the installer will be a bit up-to-date that includes the critical updates, right?
     
  4. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #4
    Nope... at some point you will have to download it over the Internet from Apple's servers. Now what you could do is DL it to a USB key at work on a Mac there then take the USB key home to install on your Mac. But at some point you need to download it.

    That is correct. For example, it you DL and install Mavs today you would get the latest 10.9.2 version.
     
  5. MacBookWhooo thread starter macrumors newbie

    MacBookWhooo

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2014
    Location:
    Philippines
    #5
    Okay so you're telling me to kinda do a direct downloading of the ISO file? Where can I get it?

    I agree, that's what I got. So when the App Store checked for some updates, it just updated the Apps included in Mavericks not the entire OS itself. I hope I can get the latest ISO of it though. For backup. In case if there's no fast Internet connection available.
     
  6. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #6
    If your Mac did not come with Mavericks, you would have gotten it through the App Store app, and it that were the case, you could just go there and redownload the installer and copy it to a USB key. It would be a DMG file and not an ISO, but very similar concept.

    If your Mac is new and came with Mavericks from the factory, it won't be in your purchases list in the App Store, so that is a no go. You will need to use this convoluted process to grab the DMG file from Apple's servers.

    Then you can use the DMG file with this free app to make the USB key installer.
     
  7. Hawkery macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    #7
    Piggybacking off this, is anyone able to explain what all the different format types mean?

    Extended (or all they all extended? I assume from the name this is an extension to something else)
    Journal - I'm told this slows down the 'write' process and creates a journal of everything a user is doing, so that if a power outage were to happen then it can recreate the data, yes?
    Encrypted - I presume this does what is says on the tin?
    Case sensitive - Literally does it what it says on the tin according to other forums?

    Extended and Encrypted are the only two I'm totally unsure on.

    Thanks!
     
  8. BasicGreatGuy Contributor

    BasicGreatGuy

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Location:
    In the middle of several books.
    #8
    The former deals with the disk formatting that is geared towards larger drives and breaks the 32 bit file limit, such as you would see in a Windows environment, or with brand new external drives that have been formatted to accommodate such.

    The latter encrypts the drive such that a password is needed to unlock if for use. If the drive has been encrypted and the password forgotten or lost, the contents of the drive will be lost. The only way to decrypt the drive without the password, is the erase it in Disk Utility. This is a very good security measure and one that is recommended upon installation of the OS. It can also be turned on under System Preferences > Security & Privacy > FileVault.
     
  9. Hawkery macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    #9
    Thanks for the info.

    Sadly I was unaware that when installing Yosemite it attempts to link iCloud, iTunes and the Apple Store username & password with your own Mac profile UN and PW. This wasn't clearly made obvious to me during installation as first time round the graphics were sketchy causing pages to not load clearly so I had to skip several without fully reading them only to find I couldn't fully install Origin without a password and after trying all possibilities (apart from my Apple ID p/w) I had to reinstall.

    The encryption may be handy for security, though I'd argue it's even handier when you're aware of what it's doing.
     
  10. hiddenmarkov macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Japan
    #10
    case sensitive will have the mac os at its core level be case sensitive like most any unix/Linux/bsd os is.


    Be wary of the fact though some applications may not work with this turned on. Some app devs code for the usual default case insensitive install so the app is not as picky if looking for a file location.


    With case sensitive turned there is major difference between say

    /var/Myfile
    and
    /var/myfile

    You'd see this issue with non cli app installs most likely. Near as I can tell with builds off source or use of brew projects you get very good porting where the files keep to being strict unix/linux/bsd standards for cli only apps.
     

Share This Page