Install Apps on External Drive?

.ImNuMBeR1

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 30, 2012
26
0
Cambridge, UK
Hey guys.

From my previous topic about my Macbook, I was very impressed with the response time of replies and I thank and appreciate the fast active responses!

I have a question, or rather a problem again. As I have the mid-2014 model Macbook Air; I only have a 128GB SSD, and it is non-upgradable to Macbooks. So I've been told to use an external hard disk. So I have done this, but now I have errors with some applications complaining that they don't have root ownership and what not.

How would I go about being able to install packages/applications to my external drive? Some apps have the ability to change the destination drive, but others do not. How would I change it manually?

Thank you so much!
 

simonsi

macrumors 601
Jan 3, 2014
4,849
716
Auckland
Many apps will run quite happily if you drag the app from Applications to your external drive.

However I run a 64GB MBA and find I can have all my Apps on the internal, only needing some media pushed to an external, that way the App loads quickly, you have to live with loading image libraries etc being slower but generally the App stays responsive if run from the internal drive.
 

.ImNuMBeR1

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 30, 2012
26
0
Cambridge, UK
Many apps will run quite happily if you drag the app from Applications to your external drive.

However I run a 64GB MBA and find I can have all my Apps on the internal, only needing some media pushed to an external, that way the App loads quickly, you have to live with loading image libraries etc being slower but generally the App stays responsive if run from the internal drive.
Thanks for your input, Simonsi. I have moved some of the more "bigger" GB apps to my Western Digital Portable drive, but is there a way to change destination for installer packages that do not provide a "Change destination" at all?

Thanks.
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
63,832
30,349
Boston
but is there a way to change destination for installer packages that do not provide a "Change destination" at all?
No, I don't believe so. Its basically due to the fact that /Applications is the default standard for where apps go, so all installers just hard code that location. You have to deal with the apps getting installed there and then moving them
 
Last edited:

steve23094

macrumors 68030
Apr 23, 2013
2,612
1,330
Hey guys.

From my previous topic about my Macbook, I was very impressed with the response time of replies and I thank and appreciate the fast active responses!

I have a question, or rather a problem again. As I have the mid-2014 model Macbook Air; I only have a 128GB SSD, and it is non-upgradable to Macbooks. So I've been told to use an external hard disk. So I have done this, but now I have errors with some applications complaining that they don't have root ownership and what not.

How would I go about being able to install packages/applications to my external drive? Some apps have the ability to change the destination drive, but others do not. How would I change it manually?

Thank you so much!
A little while ago I investigated the same thing.

Don't quote me on this but if I remember correctly you can change your home folder location using OS X server, eg putting it on an external drive. But it was so much hassle and there were a bunch of caveats I decided I couldn't be bothered.

In the end I let Apps install to my internal disk if they want to, if they have an option to install to my external drive I do so. It's really easy to move your iTunes library to your external disk so that's all your music and videos. It's also easy to change Steam default install location to any folder you want.
 

cincygolfgrrl

macrumors 6502
Apr 2, 2012
344
225
Somewhere In Time
Apps on the internal drive

Data that won't fit on internal goes to external

I ran a MacBook Air with a 128GB internal SSD for three years. During that time I took up photography with a dSLR as a hobby—storing and manipulating RAW files on an external drive. The MacBook Air handled the tasks pretty well.

Macs tend to "just work" if you live within the parameters the engineers designed and built. If you screw around, trying to reinvent the system, you'll only get yourself into trouble and end up having a less-than-satisfactory experience. Of course it's your choice…