Install windows then Virtualization or vice versa

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by ramw5p, Sep 20, 2011.

  1. ramw5p macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2010
    #1
    Hi guys, do i install windos using bootcamp assiatant 1st, then install the virtualization software [parrelells etc]..ot software 1st then widows? Thanks
     
  2. Quad5Ny macrumors 6502a

    Quad5Ny

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2009
    Location:
    New York, USA
  3. TomH TX macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2010
    #3
    I did not create a bootcamp partition, although I have seen people mention doing it that way. I just installed Parallels 6, and then followed the steps to create a new virtual machine, at which point I loaded Win 7 Pro.
     
  4. Quad5Ny macrumors 6502a

    Quad5Ny

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2009
    Location:
    New York, USA
    #4
    It depends on what you want to do. It sounded like he wanted Boot Camp and Parallels.
     
  5. ramw5p thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2010
    #5
    Thanks..to clarify

    I dont want boot camp and a virtual program..thinking just a virtualization program, but i didnt know if i used the program to install windows, or installed widows FIRST using bootcamp partition etc, then installed the virtualization program [parrallels].
     
  6. TomH TX macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2010
    #6
    So, sounds like you are looking for like what I did. Parallels or VM to create your virtual environment, THEN you load Windows into that.
     
  7. ramw5p thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2010
    #7
    Thanks Tom

    So......parallels or VM install 1ST...THEN install windows. Got it. Do i use VM or Parallels to install windows???? is it just intuitive? I thought i had to partition the HDD or somehting before windows, is VM doing this for me? Thanks
     
  8. tomllama macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2007
    Location:
    CA
    #8
    You are confusing what boot camp or parallels do.

    If all you want is the occasional use of Windows, and don't care if it runs a bit slower, then Parallels is a great way to go. You load Parallels and then it does all the work to install Windows. It does not create a separate partition, it keeps everything on the Mac OSX disk.

    The downside of the Parallels first and no boot camp approach is that if you decide you want to go to boot camp, it's not trivial to move everything.

    If you do a boot camp partition - the way you can boot to Windows and run it without OSX - it takes more time and effort on your part. The instructions must be followed exactly if you want it to work (and to ensure you don't do something dumb to destroy your OSX install. If youy can print out directions and follow them, it will be fine. After you get Windows up and running via boot camp, you can easily install Parallels and tell it to use your boot camp install. You then have the option of running Windows natively (booting to it) or running it by simply opening a Parallels VM from in OSX. Windows runs faster natively than in a VM. My gut is about 25% slower in the VM, but I've done no real tests.

    I run using Parallels on occasion (now on V7 but started with V3 years ago) but most often I find I boot to Windows and run it via boot camp. If you do run via boot camp, you'll want to consider adding Tuxera NTFS to allow OSX to write to your Windows (NTFS) formatted disk and something like MacDrive to allow Windows to read/write to your OSX (HFS+) disk. With Parallels (no boot camp), you don't need either of these as it takes care of it for you.
     
  9. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #9
    Boot camp - allows you to run windows as if you have a PC, it runs natively, you reboot your Mac leaving OSX.

    Parallels/Fusion - allows you to run windows inside OSX. Downside is performance and no direct access to hardware. Generally ok for most tasks and the user prefers OSX over windows

    Both Parallels/Fusion can use your bootcamp partition instead of creating a proprietary virtual file. This gives you the ability to run windows inside OSX or if you want reboot and start windows natively.

    I personally don't use bootcamp as my needs are such that VMware fusion satisfies them.
     

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