Installing Macbooks Pro's all in the same way

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Yzord, Aug 9, 2011.

  1. Yzord macrumors member

    Yzord

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2010
    #1
    At my work, large high school, we are experimenting with Macbooks pro's to see if these are much more stable then windows system for editing movies etc.

    Normally we use Windows based machines and thoese are all imaged with the same image trough Ghost.

    We want to use a structure, so we can image all Macbooks at the same time.
    So i thought to do the following:

    Installing a Macbook Pro with all the software it needs for editing movies, pictures and so on. After that start up Time Warp for backing up the whole OS. After that, get a fresh new macbook pro, start up Time Warp and restore the backup from the first macbook pro.

    This sounds easy, and if everything is right, it should be, but somehow i do think i forget something.

    Is this a good way for making all the same macbooks? or is there any better software around who could fix this for me?

    Please do not shoot me for it, but i never used a macbook pro and it's software, cause we always worked with Windows.
     
  2. Blue Sun macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2009
    Location:
    Australia
    #2
    I think Carbon Copy Cloner would be the best suited method for your needs.

    And you mean "Time Machine", right?

    Hope that helps.
     
  3. Mr. Retrofire macrumors 601

    Mr. Retrofire

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    www.emiliana.cl/en
    #3
    You can do this with a larger USB flash drive (depends on the software you install on the reference MBP) or with a dedicated external hard disk.

    Here is what you can do (just as an example):
    1. Create two partitions on a USB flash drive or dedicated external hard disk (FireWire 800, if possible), one for the minimal OS installation and one for the restore disk image. Disk Utility helps you here. The partition scheme must be GUID partition table (GPT).
    2. Now install Mac OS X (minimal installation is sufficient) on the first partition.
    3. Restart your Mac from this new installation, open Disk Utility, select the hard disk of the reference MBP and click the new image symbol in the Disk Utility toolbar. Save the disk image as a compressed disk image, so that the restores are quicker (less data to read from a disk).
    4. Restart your Mac again, but use now the internal hard disk. You have now a bootable Mac OS X installation and a restore disk image on your USB flash drive or external hard disk.
    5. Go now to each MBP, start from the USB flash drive or external hard disk, open Disk Utility and use the restore function to overwrite the contents of the internal hard disk of each MBP with the contents of the restore disk image.
    6. Done.

    If you do it for the first time, it is probably a bit more complicated, but i'm sure you will find out how you can do it.
     
  4. Yzord thread starter macrumors member

    Yzord

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2010
    #4
    Thanks for the answer, i will try it out. And yes, sorry, i meant Time Machine :)
     
  5. Yzord thread starter macrumors member

    Yzord

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2010
    #5
    I tried the last method, and it worked :) very nice.

    But i have a small question...can i access a boot menu before the MBP starts his OS?
     
  6. bolen macrumors 6502

    bolen

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Location:
    Sweden
    #6
    Yes, hold down the alt/option key when starting the computer and you'll get to choose the boot device.
     
  7. Mr. Retrofire macrumors 601

    Mr. Retrofire

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    www.emiliana.cl/en
    #7
    Do you mean something like this:
    http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1310

    ?
     
  8. Yzord thread starter macrumors member

    Yzord

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2010
  9. Tali macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    #9
    Carbon Copy Cloner has already been mentioned. It also works nicely with Deploy Studio. http://www.deploystudio.com/Home.html


    I'm assuming you also run a server somewhere (no clue if it also works without one)

    You create an image from a freshly installed machine and load that into deploy studio.
    With netboot (there are some good youtube vids on how to set it up) you can deploy the os from the server.

    We use this process at my workplace to distribute clean installs after problems or even to update all the programs once in a while (it's quite a lot of work to do all those manually, so we just create a new image and send that out).

    Keep in mind that the setup requires some work, it's not too difficult though.
     

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