Installing OS 9 Drivers on HDD Where Not Present

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by bunnspecial, Feb 7, 2015.

  1. bunnspecial macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

    Joined:
    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #1
    As the title indicates-is there any way-short of repartitioning the drive-to install OS 9 drivers on a disk where they are not currently present?

    I just transplanted a new hard drive into my TiBook, and decided to keep the Leopard install presently on it rather than cloning what was on the old Ti disk(there was nothing of value there, where by contrast the HDD that I put in it had some decent programs and other good files). The only problem is that the new HDD came out of a computer that did natively boot into OS 9, and whoever set it up didn't bother to install the OS 9 drivers.

    Now that the drive is in a computer that can boot into OS 9, I'd like to install OS 9 and do so without wiping the drive. I do not have a bootable OS 9 disk for this computer-it requires a "special" version of 9.2.2, and the only way I know to get it on there without doing a clean install is by drag and drop.

    And, on a cursorily related note, I sort of semi-bricked a Cube a few weeks back by attempting a drag-and-drop OS 9 install without realizing that it didn't have the OS 9 drivers installed(Target Disk Mode saved me there).

    I'd appreciate any guidance anyone could give me on this.

    By the way, going to a 7200rpm drive has made a world of difference in how responsive and useable my 867mhz TiBook is.
     
  2. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #2
    A reformat of the drive is required to install the OS 9 drivers without going into extremely advanced Terminal commands.
     
  3. bunnspecial thread starter macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

    Joined:
    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #3
    That's what I was afraid of...I'll reformat then clone.
     
  4. poiihy macrumors 68020

    poiihy

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2014
    #4
    Is there any reason not to install OS 9 drivers? Why is it an option?
     
  5. bunnspecial thread starter macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

    Joined:
    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #5
    I always do it on PPC Macs since I switch hard drives around often enough that I never know where a drive might end up eventually.

    I suppose some folks just skip it when installing a drive in a computer not capable of booting to OS 9. I don't know if there are any advantages to not installing the driver, but if there are I have yet to find them(I suppose it might consume a little more of the "overhead" capacity on a drive, but then I don't know how much).

    In any case, I've already reformatted the drive and currently have it cloning. I actually cloned the 7200RPM drive onto the SSD in my DLSD last night, and am turning around tonight and cloning the SSD back onto the 7200RPM drive. I just wish there were an easier way around this.

    Thank goodness for Firewire and target disk mode....
     
  6. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #6
    There is no reason to install the OS 9 drivers on a drive that lives in a G5, or even most SATA drives. They do take up a about one hundred megabytes of space.
     
  7. eyoungren macrumors P6

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    Phoenix • 85037
    #7
    I don't install them period, unless I am forced to. If I want to run something in OS9 (shudder) I have two OS9 only Macs in the garage.

    I was forced to do it on my iMac G3 just to get Tiger on that Mac because the firmware is still expecting to see OS9 drivers. But Tiger is the only OS on that Mac.

    Did I mention I hate OS9? :D
     
  8. bunnspecial thread starter macrumors 603

    bunnspecial

    Joined:
    May 3, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    #8
    I didn't realize their footprint was that large...even so, on an IDE drive I'm going to continue installing them regardless of where the drive is going at the time.
     

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