Installing RAM

Discussion in 'iMac' started by realph, Sep 7, 2011.

  1. realph macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2007
    #1
    I'm installing RAM into my girlfriend's new iMac (Mid 2011), where do I connect the disposable anti static wrist strap to?
     
  2. MrCheeto macrumors 68030

    MrCheeto

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2008
    #2
    A sink faucet or any other metal plumbing fixture. It works, anyway.
     
  3. speacock macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2011
    Location:
    UK
    #3
    To the metal part of the casing so that you, the memory and the computer are all at the same potential difference.

    In the old days you were always told to leave the computer connected to the mains so that you could be certain that you were actually grounded, but I think the health and safety police decided that was a bad idea, better to zap a computer than zap a human, though given it's your girlfriend's Mac not yours, you may decide different:rolleyes:
     
  4. MrCheeto macrumors 68030

    MrCheeto

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2008
    #4
    ^ Well except that aluminum is non-conductive...

    But yes, if there is a conductive component in a computer, say the metal power prongs on the back or battery prongs, that's the best place to discharge.
     
  5. ThemacNub macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2010
    Location:
    Australia
    #5
    Aluminium is conductive it's used in power lines
     
  6. MrCheeto macrumors 68030

    MrCheeto

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2008
    #6
    Ah, I was thinking of magnetism. The idea stands; aluminum is less conductive than, say, the prongs that supply power to the machine.
     
  7. keewee macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2008
    #7
    Wood is conductive too but yeah... some thing are more conductive than other
     
  8. speacock, Sep 7, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2011

    speacock macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2011
    Location:
    UK
    #8
    You beat me to it

    Actually, there's a fair chance that the power pins are made of aluminium too, as are the power cables in the building and almost certainly the HT power cables that carry power from the generating station to the local substation.

    Aluminium is a very good conductor, it's only slightly less conductive than gold, which is used in most of the other components of the computer.

    The only widely used things that are more conductive are silver, copper and gold (in decending order). Aluminium is used because it is lightweight, relatively environmentally inert (compared to silver and copper) and much cheaper than the others.
     

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