Installing VirtualBox

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Iphone4sinwhite, Jan 29, 2015.

  1. Iphone4sinwhite macrumors 6502

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    #1
    I've installed the latest version of Virtualbox on my Yosemite MBP. I have windows 7 installed on bootcamp. When I run virtual box I get a fatal error that stating there is no bootable disk. Do I need to put in the windows 7 disk when first running the windows 7 virtual machine?
     
  2. drlunanerd macrumors 65816

    drlunanerd

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    #2
  3. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #3
    I was under the impression using BC along with VB is not possible.
     
  4. roadkill401 macrumors 6502

    roadkill401

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    #4
    I was wondering why you would want to have a VM that links to your bootcamp rather than just have Windows in a VM and get rid of bootcamp all together?


    I use Fusion as I couldn't get Parrallels to work right for myself and it seemed to want to put apps inside my mack that I didn't particularly want. I have a 27" iMac with a second monitor running. I liked the idea of I could essentially have my Mac on the main monitor and Windows (or Linux, older OSX versions for testing) running on the secondary monitor.

    The benefit of running windows in it's own VM is the snapshot function. In a true VM you can take a point in time snapshot of your OS and apps running and revert back to it later. You can't do that with a live directory like putting the bootcamp partition in a VM.

    You save no real disk space with Bootcamp vs a VM. The only gain you get is if you effectively turn off your mac and boot into windows you will gain a bit more speed vs having it in a VM... But I have found even intensive apps like Photoshop run pretty fine for me in a VM.

    I am just wondering what App you are looking to do? ie, is it a game?
     
  5. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    Because you don't get direct access to the hardware, the performance isn't as good and sometimes I just plain old prefer to be in Windows natively.
     
  6. roadkill401 macrumors 6502

    roadkill401

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    #6
    I understand that you don't get direct access to hardware, but you do get direct access to your native Apple OSX so you could do things like cut and paste between the windows VM and an OSX app.

    Performance hit is really only a bit thing when you start to deal with direct graphics card calls, not to say it's not there for everything else. But you are paying one hefty premium buying apple hardware to essentially forgo it to run windows natively. And Apple hardware really isn't a gameing system compared to what can and is done on the DIY windows type machines.

    I was more curious why people bootcamp.
     
  7. Iphone4sinwhite thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #7
    I am trying to use MathCad, a math software program. Is this something that can used in a windows VM (like you're suggesting) as opposed to a bootcamp VM which I had been using through fusion in the past?
     
  8. Iphone4sinwhite, Jan 31, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2015

    Iphone4sinwhite thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #8
  9. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #9
    Because I think it boils down to, because I want too :)

    When I'm working in windows, its far easier to keep it as the native OS. Personal preference I suppose.
     

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