Intel 80GB SSD too small?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by eron, Jun 14, 2009.

  1. eron macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    #1
    Hi,

    A late 08 umbp user here.

    I just bought a Intel X25-m 80gb without realising that it's actually too small for me! I thought by clearing off many of my videos to an external, I'll save enough space to fit 'all' my stuff into 80gb. Unfortunately, I soon discover that my music files are already almost 40GB.

    Solutions are running though my novice head, but I want to hear what more experienced people think.

    I want to keep my superdrive, so the option of running 2 hdds is out.
    I could sell it and get a 500gb scorpio blue instead.

    If I had the newest mbp, running music on SD cards can be an option.
    However, I don't want to shell out more money for the expresscard ssd option.


    Let me hear it!
     
  2. MacModMachine macrumors 68020

    MacModMachine

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Location:
    Canada
    #2

    i would consider a cheaper expresscard, such as the ocz slate 92$ cdn it is 32gb and slower, but would be perfect for the music.

    another option is sell the intel and buy the corsair p128 which uses the new samsung controller and is priced almost the same as the intel, but offers extra 40gb space.
     
  3. Anuba macrumors 68040

    Anuba

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2005
    #3
    I don't know if it's a solution as such, but... I don't keep any large files on the local drives, I have all my music, video, photos and work files on a 1 TB NAS drive (RAID 1) that I can access from all computers on my home network. All I have on the computers themselves is applications, email and lighter documents (Word, Excel, PDF etc). I'd easily get by on an 80 GB drive.

    Unfortunately this works better in Windows than OS X, since it's very easy to permanently mount network shares as logical drives in Windows, and Windows Media Player keeps an eye on my media library so that any new additions are soon reflected by all the computers. In iTunes you have to add new files manually. The NAS drive has the ability to act like an iTunes server, which would save me from the trouble of sync'ing the Macs manually, but iTunes refuses to copy shared files to iPod and iPhone so that's useless. But it's great with Front Row, I just put an alias for my network drive's video folder in the local 'Movies' folder, so whenever I copy new video files to the NAS drive they're instantly available on the Mac Mini I've got hooked up to my TV. I barely ever use the mouse and keyboard, I just operate the Mini with the Apple Remote.
     

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