Intel Xeon w5580 vs w5590

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by wally21, Aug 14, 2009.

  1. wally21 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    #1
    I thought the only difference between the two processors was the 3.33 Ghz speed for the w5590 vs the 3.2 Ghz speed for the w5580, but if you look at intel's site, it shows shows the w5590 as not having turbo-boost.

    http://ark.intel.com/Compare.aspx?ids=41643,37113,

    Could this be? I'm guessing that they just haven't updated the specs on their site, since there are a lot of blank entries.

    Also, I'm guessing that since vendors show it as has having turbo-boost, it probably does, but why wouldn't intel (the chip's maker afterall) have that information updated on it's website?
     
  2. tobyg macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    #2
    I know this is hard to believe, since you're looking at Intel's official website, but their website is quite often wrong. It says the W5590 doesn't even support ECC Memory. Obviously that is wrong. Oh and it doesn't support Intel 64 huh? Or VT? Yeah, obviously that's missing some things and just plain wrong.
     
  3. AZREOSpecialist macrumors 68000

    AZREOSpecialist

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    #3
    That's weird. The Core i7 975 @ 3.33 GHz has Turbo Boost. The Xeon W3580 @ 3.33 GHz has Turbo Boost. These are just variations of the same basic chip, so I would be inclined to believe it is just an error.

     
  4. risingforce macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    #4
    Hello

    I have a quadcore 2.66GHz Nehalem Mac Pro Early 2009. On Ebay I saw the w5580 processor at a good price.
    Could install w5580 on my Mac Pro?


    Greetings
     
  5. Umbongo macrumors 601

    Umbongo

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Location:
    England
    #5
    It hasn't been confirmed that 5500 series Xeons work on the single socket Mac Pro, but there should be no reason it wouldn't.

    Understand that the W5580 is intended for dual socket boards and thus has a higher price over the W3580 and W3590 while not offering you anything extra on a single socket system.
     
  6. gugucom macrumors 68020

    gugucom

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    May 21, 2009
    Location:
    Munich, Germany
    #6
    Intel have designed single, dual and quad socket CPUs for a reason. AFAIK you cannot downgrade a dual socket CPU to single.
     
  7. Umbongo macrumors 601

    Umbongo

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    Sep 14, 2006
    Location:
    England
    #7
    You can with the Xeon 5500s. Couldn't with any other 5000 series Xeons.
     
  8. gugucom macrumors 68020

    gugucom

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    May 21, 2009
    Location:
    Munich, Germany
    #8
    Can you elaborate a bit on the source of your know how?
     
  9. Umbongo macrumors 601

    Umbongo

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Location:
    England
    #9
    Motherboard manuals/datasheets and companies selling single socket systems with config options of 3500s and 5500s.

    link 1 link 2

    It's been mentioned in a few articles on Nehalem Xeons too, but I have no idea what sites I read them on.
     
  10. risingforce macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    #10
    So that means I can not install a w5580 or 5590 processor in a single socket Mac Pro quadcore because it only works on dual motherboard of Mac Pro Octocore?

    Sorry for my English.


    Greetings
     
  11. Umbongo macrumors 601

    Umbongo

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Location:
    England
    #11
    No, you should be able to, other board makers support it as does Intel. Just Apple can do things sometimes to break functionality and I don't know of anyone who has tested it.

    Only buy one if you can get them a lot cheaper than the W3580 or W3590.
     
  12. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #12
    As Umbongo pointed out, this time, you can. :) But it won't work in reverse, so no SP parts in DP boards. ;) The reason, is the DP parts can disable the unused QPI channel. The SP chipsets don't have them, so the data is routed correctly, and it all works.

    Since the control (ON/OFF) is in the chip and not the chipset, the second QPI on the chipset is always active on DP boards, and not connected if an SP CPU were installed. So the data isn't routed properly, and the system hangs.

    I don't think Apple would have broken this, but it's possible. And as mentioned, from a cost POV, it doesn't make much sense, unless you happen to spot a really good deal somewhere (i.e. eBay/Craig's List).
     

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