Interesting article about 1.1.1 and hacking/unlocking

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by FSUSem1noles, Sep 28, 2007.

  1. FSUSem1noles macrumors 68000

    FSUSem1noles

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2006
    Location:
    Ft. Lauderdale
    #1
    Apple sends iPhone hackers back to the drawing board: 1.1.1 firmware uses different encryption scheme

    Posted 27 September 2007 @ 6pm in News

    “It’s a cat-and-mouse game,” said Steve Jobs. “We try to stay ahead. People will try to break in, and it’s our job to stop them breaking in.”

    The cat has caught the mouse, for now.

    In a serious setback for the capability to install third-party native applications on the iPhone, as well as activate the device without an AT&T SIM card, Apple has changed the encryption methodology for the iPhone with the 1.1.1 firmware/software update, meaning that old processes for “jailbreaking” the device — putting it into a mode where files can be written to and from the phone — are now defunct.

    As explained by our friend Lucas Newman who worked to develop the first third-party native game for the iPhone (”Lights Out!”) and put together an informal SDK for the device, finding the encryption key is harder now. “It used to be plaintext in the RAM disk,” said Newman. “But they changed it, and no one knows how to get at it quite yet.”

    We previously reported that none of the current tools for jailbreaking the iPhone, including AppTapp, iNdependence, iActivator, iBrickr, etc.

    The new encryption method is apparently similar to that used by the iPod touch, which hackers have thus far had little success in jailbreaking.

    Apple’s change is also bad news for tools that make modifications without requiring jailbreaks, like Ambrosia Software’s iToner, designed to add ringtones to the device without going through iTunes. Ringtones placed on the iPhone by that application did not survive the update to firmware/software version 1.1, and new ringtones cannot be transferred to devices that have been updated.

    While this is certainly a serious curve-ball Apple has thrown, the iPhone hacking community’s ingenuity shouldn’t be underestimated. It was a matter of hours before jailbreak tools were rewritten to properly function with the last firmware update; while the current release appears to be of a different structure entirely, the hacking community is already banging on the door. In the words of one poster to the Hackintosh forums (where iPhone hacking efforts are rampant): “the fun starts again”

    Looks like Apple apparently changed the whole stucture, not just the encryption..
     
  2. mpuck972 macrumors 6502

    mpuck972

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2007
    #2
    So this is Apples new strategy for promoting their user satisfaction based company huh? Play games with them? Imagine if they had spent half the time in the last 3 months developing legit apps and real functionality instead of trying to find ways to play 'cat and mouse'. Apple should be embarrassed for what they are doing to their reputation. They are the new Microsoft, but with 1/10 the users and revenue.
     
  3. Myles123 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2007
    #3
    Well said!
     
  4. robvia macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    #4
    Honestly, I don't think they're trying to break other apps.

    Just imagine if they "tried" to make their software updates compatible with the hacks. Do you think they could do it? It would be very hard.

    So I don't think they have to do much in order to make the phone useless when updating to a new version in terms of the hacks.
     
  5. Applemacmonkey macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2007
    #5
    That's the biggest load of bullsh*t. 'How dare they protect their copyrighted material?!'.

    With regards to their reputation - do you think most people actually care that a few little hackers can't play hacked nes games on their iPhones?
     
  6. Speedracer04 macrumors 6502a

    Speedracer04

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2006
    Location:
    Michigan
    #6
    Why do you say that it would be hard. All Apple would have had to do is not change the firmware structure and everyone would have had apps again.

    You call restructuring the entire firmware not "to much" heh, I think its a bit harder than that and took quite a bit of time to do.
     

Share This Page