Invalid Content in Journal

Discussion in 'OS X El Capitan (10.11)' started by mtngoatjoe, Nov 30, 2015.

  1. mtngoatjoe, Nov 30, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2015

    mtngoatjoe macrumors regular

    mtngoatjoe

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2008
    #1
    Ok, so I get an "Invalid Content in Journal" when I try to repair a partition on an external drive. We has some power failures lately, so I think my external drive developed an issue.

    Running First Aid, Disk Utility says "Invalid Content in Journal". It says the volume is repaired, but it doesn't work.

    A google search leads to a couple of suggestions to disable the journal via Terminal.

    Edit: With the help of Leman, I updated these instructions for OS X El Capitan. This process worked for me. Good luck!

    The process below is based off instructions from this site: https://jkinsa.wordpress.com/2014/11/09/osx-disk-issue-invalid-content-in-journal/

    With the help of Leman, I’ve updated the steps for OS X El Capitan.

    1. Open a Terminal (Applications > Utilities)
    2. Locate the Identifier for the disk (i.e. /dev/disk2s3)
      1. Prompt (Type this at the prompt in the terminal): DiskUtil list
      2. Note: If you are not sure which disk is yours, you can run diskutil with the disk unconnected and connected.
    3. Disable the journal for the current Disk
      1. Prompt: sudo /System/Library/Filesystems/hfs.fs/Contents/Resources/hfs.util -N /dev/disk5s2
        • Remember to use the correct Identifier for your disk
      2. Type in your password when prompted
        • Result: Turned off the journaling bit for /dev/disk2s3
    4. Test the disk in Disk Utility (Applications > Utilities)
      1. Highlight your volume in Disk Utility and select First Aid.
      2. After First Aid is done, click Mount.
      3. The volume shows up on your desktop!
    5. Locate the Mounted on point for the volume (i.e. /Volumes/My Book)
      • Prompt: df
    6. Enable the journal for the volume
      1. Prompt:
        sudo /System/Library/Filesystems/hfs.fs/Contents/Resources/hfs.util -J /Volumes/MountedOn
        • Remember to use your volume mount point
      2. Type in your password when prompted
        • Result: Allocated 155648K for journal file.
    7. Test the disk in Disk Utility (Applications > Utilities)
      • Highlight your volume in Disk Utility and select First Aid.
    8. Spend the money and buy a backup drive. You wouldn’t have needed to go through this if you could have wiped the drive and restored it from a backup!
     
  2. leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #2
    Try

    cd /System/Library/Filesystems/hfs.fs/Contents/Resources/

    in step 3. I have no idea if this will work. But that is where hfs.util is located.
     
  3. mtngoatjoe thread starter macrumors regular

    mtngoatjoe

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2008
    #3
    Thank you!!!!!! That did the trick. I got my drive back and updated the instructions in my original post.
     
  4. chrfr macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2009
    #4
    You could remove step 3 and change step 4 to be
    Code:
    sudo /System/Library/Filesystems/hfs.fs/Contents/Resources/hfs.util -N /dev/disk5s2
    
    and then change step 7 to
    Code:
    sudo /System/Library/Filesystems/hfs.fs/Contents/Resources/hfs.util -J /Volumes/MountedOn
    
    It's not necessary to be in a particular directory to run a command in that directory so the "cd" command is superfluous.
     
  5. mtngoatjoe thread starter macrumors regular

    mtngoatjoe

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2008
    #5
    That's a really good point. Thanks!
     

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