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bsellers267

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Mar 3, 2012
12
0
Mississippi
Gotta love when Apple derps and I find a bug that hasn't been fixed since iOS 7.0. Small and harmless, but it IS a bug nether-the-less.
A link to the video I made to show the problem occurring.

Here are instructions on how to recreate it. See if it works for your iOS devices and let me know! I have an iPhone 5 running iOS 7.0.4.

1) Press sleep/wake button to view the lock screen.
2) Slide the camera pane upwards towards the top 1/4th of the screen.
3) Keeping your finger on the top 1/4th mark, hold down the home button to activate siri.
4) When siri has been activated, release both fingers and hold down the sleep/wake button until the power down screen is shown.
5) Press the home button. This should bring the camera application into view.
6) Press the cancel button on the power down screen.
7) Press the home button. You should now exit the camera application and be back in the lock screen.
8) Try entering your passcode and logging in as normal. The device can still be asleep and the bug will still work in this state.
9) When the phone is unlocked, the iPhone should stall at the home screen and flash white and restart.
 

Shrink

macrumors G3
Feb 26, 2011
8,931
1,611
New England, USA
Gotta love when Apple derps and I find a bug that hasn't been fixed since iOS 7.0. Small and harmless, but it IS a bug nether-the-less.
A link to the video I made to show the problem occurring.

Here are instructions on how to recreate it. See if it works for your iOS devices and let me know! I have an iPhone 5 running iOS 7.0.4.

1) Press sleep/wake button to view the lock screen.
2) Slide the camera pane upwards towards the top 1/4th of the screen.
3) Keeping your finger on the top 1/4th mark, hold down the home button to activate siri.
4) When siri has been activated, release both fingers and hold down the sleep/wake button until the power down screen is shown.
5) Press the home button. This should bring the camera application into view.
6) Press the cancel button on the power down screen.
7) Press the home button. You should now exit the camera application and be back in the lock screen.
8) Try entering your passcode and logging in as normal. The device can still be asleep and the bug will still work in this state.
9) When the phone is unlocked, the iPhone should stall at the home screen and flash white and restart.

Would someone please explain to me why anybody would go through all those steps to produce a bug.

Granted...it's a bug. But under what circumstances would anyone do those steps. Is there an app or feature that requires doing those 9 actions?

Does that bug effect your use of your iOS 7 device on a daily basis? Weekly? Ever?

Just curious...:)
 
Comment

trigf

macrumors 6502
Jun 16, 2009
265
218
Gotta love when Apple derps and I find a bug that hasn't been fixed since iOS 7.0. Small and harmless, but it IS a bug nether-the-less.
A link to the video I made to show the problem occurring.

Here are instructions on how to recreate it. See if it works for your iOS devices and let me know! I have an iPhone 5 running iOS 7.0.4.

1) Press sleep/wake button to view the lock screen.
2) Slide the camera pane upwards towards the top 1/4th of the screen.
3) Keeping your finger on the top 1/4th mark, hold down the home button to activate siri.
4) When siri has been activated, release both fingers and hold down the sleep/wake button until the power down screen is shown.
5) Press the home button. This should bring the camera application into view.
6) Press the cancel button on the power down screen.
7) Press the home button. You should now exit the camera application and be back in the lock screen.
8) Try entering your passcode and logging in as normal. The device can still be asleep and the bug will still work in this state.
9) When the phone is unlocked, the iPhone should stall at the home screen and flash white and restart.

Tried these instructions, did not crash my iPhone 5S. Tried several times, every step was followed, but no white flash and restart. Maybe it doesn't affect everyone?
 
Comment

Jimbo47

macrumors 6502a
Jun 21, 2010
728
3
Doesn't work on 5S because of the fingerprint reader. It reads your print and unlocks the phone, so when you push the home button again to exit the camera app it takes you to the home screen.
 
Comment

John T

macrumors 68020
Mar 18, 2006
2,114
6
UK.
Yes, in the literal sense of the word, it's a bug. However, as Shrink has already said, apart from people with a mindset specifically set on finding so-called bugs, would, in normal usage, go through those stupid steps?!

Ergo, a total waste of time! :rolleyes:
 
Comment

PNutts

macrumors 601
Jul 24, 2008
4,861
356
Pacific Northwest, US
How does someone "find a bug that hasn't been fixed". Does that mean you tried a known bug and it is still an issue?

Anyway, I can make iOS 7 crash faster than that. :p

----------

Doesn't work on 5S because of the fingerprint reader. It reads your print and unlocks the phone, so when you push the home button again to exit the camera app it takes you to the home screen.

Use a finger that isn't registered.
 
Comment

bsellers267

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Mar 3, 2012
12
0
Mississippi
Yes, in the literal sense of the word, it's a bug. However, as Shrink has already said, apart from people with a mindset specifically set on finding so-called bugs, would, in normal usage, go through those stupid steps?!

Ergo, a total waste of time! :rolleyes:

Yes, you're logic is sound. I respect your opinion, but I still reported it to Apple because they need to know when there are bugs.
 
Comment

gglittle

macrumors regular
Oct 26, 2012
161
0
Yea, well, being a Windows device driver developer, I can point to dozens of "bugs" that have been around since day two of Windows (I was working on other machines on day one), some of which will never be fixed because, like this one, they are absolutely royal pains in the ass to generate. However, obviously the procedure described is one the OP does frequently, why I have no idea, but since he/she/it does perform the procedure frequently, then yes, they should have reported it.
 
Comment

CB1234

macrumors 6502a
Sep 20, 2012
767
342
Dubai, UAE
To solve this bug....follow these 9 steps..

1) put on your shorts
2) put on your tshirt
3) put on your shoes
4) go out of your house
5) activate your walking/jogging/cycling app
6) exercise yourself for a few hours
7) do warm downs/stretching
8) have shower
9) feel fresh and energized

You do all that, and the voila the bug disappears....
 
Comment

trigf

macrumors 6502
Jun 16, 2009
265
218
Doesn't work on 5S because of the fingerprint reader. It reads your print and unlocks the phone, so when you push the home button again to exit the camera app it takes you to the home screen.

That doesn't make sense. It's not that hard to press the home button without touching the metal ring.
 
Comment

Oz.

macrumors regular
Jan 20, 2011
233
31
I did it on my 4S and didn't restart, the screen got black with the apple logo for 1 second then it went back to the home screen :)
 
Comment

C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
51,388
19,440
I did it on my 4S and didn't restart, the screen got black with the apple logo for 1 second then it went back to the home screen :)
That's not a full restart but that's a respring that happens when there's a big enough crash of some sort.
 
Comment

Primejimbo

macrumors 68040
Aug 10, 2008
3,295
131
Around
I have no idea how people find these bugs, but if one person knows a lot more do too. This may never effect any of you people, but I'm glad there are people will look for these and report it back to Apple.

We should be happy there are people who will do this so Apple makes the fix to protect our info.
 
Comment

donnaw

macrumors 65816
Apr 19, 2011
1,134
6
Austin TX
Before I retired I was in software development for 20+ years. Here is how bug-fixes go:

1). Each bug found is verified (recreated) and documented in whatever bug tracking software you are using. This can be as simple as a spreadsheet to a fully developed program.

2). Usually the project manager or a committee looks at the bug list at specific intervals and each bug is assigned to a category. These run from 'show-stoppers' to very minor. The one listed by the OP would be very minor basically because the route to get there is so convoluted that it won't occur in normal usage.

3). Bugs are then assigned to developers to fix. It then goes through the fix-test process and if it passes the fix is included in the next update. Updates are scheduled. The only updates deployed outside the schedule are 'show-stoppers' (which are bugs that can bring the program down or are sever security risks). The only deviation from this is that sometimes the minor bugs are assigned to new developers to aid in their training. I don't mean 'new' as in just learning to write code but 'new' as in new to that specific software. In other words someone might have been writing code for 20 years but have no experience in iOS development. Assigning a minor fix will help get them familiar with the software. So at times a minor one will be fixed before a severe one.

The whole process is pretty rigid. It's the only way to stay on schedule. That's why some bugs never get fixed. By the time the minor ones come up on the list everyone has moved on to something else.

Oh, and the same process is used during the actual development stage. The main requirement for deployment is that all show-stoppers be fixed. That's the reason every piece of complicated software is always deployed with bugs. If you wait until every bug is fixed you'll never deploy. You'll be stuck in bug-fix-mode forever.

This doesn't mean you shouldn't report all bugs. You should. Just don't be surprised if they never get fixed.

Sorry for the long post. But knowing how the process works sometimes help alleviate frustrations.
 
Comment

Armen

macrumors 604
Apr 30, 2013
7,404
2,270
Los Angeles
Before I retired I was in software development for 20+ years. Here is how bug-fixes go:

1). Each bug found is verified (recreated) and documented in whatever bug tracking software you are using. This can be as simple as a spreadsheet to a fully developed program.

2). Usually the project manager or a committee looks at the bug list at specific intervals and each bug is assigned to a category. These run from 'show-stoppers' to very minor. The one listed by the OP would be very minor basically because the route to get there is so convoluted that it won't occur in normal usage.

3). Bugs are then assigned to developers to fix. It then goes through the fix-test process and if it passes the fix is included in the next update. Updates are scheduled. The only updates deployed outside the schedule are 'show-stoppers' (which are bugs that can bring the program down or are sever security risks). The only deviation from this is that sometimes the minor bugs are assigned to new developers to aid in their training. I don't mean 'new' as in just learning to write code but 'new' as in new to that specific software. In other words someone might have been writing code for 20 years but have no experience in iOS development. Assigning a minor fix will help get them familiar with the software. So at times a minor one will be fixed before a severe one.

The whole process is pretty rigid. It's the only way to stay on schedule. That's why some bugs never get fixed. By the time the minor ones come up on the list everyone has moved on to something else.

Oh, and the same process is used during the actual development stage. The main requirement for deployment is that all show-stoppers be fixed. That's the reason every piece of complicated software is always deployed with bugs. If you wait until every bug is fixed you'll never deploy. You'll be stuck in bug-fix-mode forever.

This doesn't mean you shouldn't report all bugs. You should. Just don't be surprised if they never get fixed.

Sorry for the long post. But knowing how the process works sometimes help alleviate frustrations.

Excellent insight. Thank you. :)
 
Comment
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