IOS Inertia Scolling

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by tinny the cat, Nov 17, 2010.

  1. tinny the cat macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    #1
    How come, compared with Andriod, WebOS, etc etc, iOS has incredible smoothness in the scrolling, every time i find myself using other phones i am appalled by the insanely awful scrolling! Even since the origional iPhone it has been this way, even now with powerful phones, some more powerful than the iPhone they cant even handle this simple aesthetic necessity
     
  2. Mike225 macrumors 6502a

    Mike225

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2010
    Location:
    SF BAY
    #2
    iOS scrolling is smoother than Android for sure, but I prefer Android scrolling over it still. iOS needs to slow their deceleration. Getting to the bottom of a page in iOS is a pain.
     
  3. FSMBP macrumors 68020

    FSMBP

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2009
    #3
    Use a Windows Phone 7. I would say scrolling is just as fluid.
     
  4. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #4
    My guess is because Android OS isn't optimized for scrolling to be put on the GPU and is instead put on the CPU with worse results.
     
  5. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2007
    Location:
    First university coding class = 46 years ago
    #5
    From what I can tell, the difference is...

    Many Android pages are filled in on the fly. In other words, as you scroll downward, the new items are added at that time. This can cause a stutter effect.

    iOS seems to preload everything, in order to make the scrolling smoother. While nice for the user most of the time, it has two critical downsides:

    1) Uses a lot more memory, which is more important when you multitask.

    2) It can run out of memory and fail. The best example of this was this recent discussion about how Safari can't display webpages that are loaded with large pictures.

    Android phones have no problem displaying those webpages, because they don't preload the whole set, but only up to a point... and then more as needed.
     

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