Mobile OSs iOS multitasking limited to 3 minutes?

mi7chy

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I thought my iPad would be an ideal low power platform for running a simple lite IRC client but it keeps dying with different IRC clients after 3 minutes in the background if switched to home screen with nothing else running. Turns out it's an iOS limitation and it doesn't truly multitask. Anyone know if this is fixed in iOS 9?



For comparison, IRC client on Android maintains a persistent connection forever in the background like any other true multitasking OS.

 
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diamond.g

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Has that app been written to take advantage of background refresh? Maybe that feature would allow you to stay connected.
 

Abazigal

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iOS does this to conserve power. It's intentional and as such, I doubt Apple will "fix" this as they don't see it as a problem to begin with.

Why does IRC need to remain open in the background again?
 

I7guy

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Nov 30, 2013
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iOS does this to conserve power. It's intentional and as such, I doubt Apple will "fix" this as they don't see it as a problem to begin with.

Why does IRC need to remain open in the background again?
I used to use IRC way back when, although it sounds like irc is an older protocol not updated for the modern Internet. But I agree with the poster above, it seems the irc client is not written correctly. After all iOS is capable of streaming Internet radio.
 

jamezr

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iOS does this to conserve power. It's intentional and as such, I doubt Apple will "fix" this as they don't see it as a problem to begin with.

Why does IRC need to remain open in the background again?
I agree. IRC is an older program for chat and data transfer. It is very light and takes up very little resources. It has been around for a very long time. IRC has to stay open in the background so you don't miss any communication.
 

Abazigal

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I agree. IRC is an older program for chat and data transfer. It is very light and takes up very little resources. It has been around for a very long time. IRC has to stay open in the background so you don't miss any communication.
How is that any different from existing chat apps which use push notifications to notify users of new messages.

Seems here it's more that IRC simply hasn't caught up with the times, rather than iOS being limiting.
 
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diamond.g

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How is that any different from existing chat apps which use push notifications to notify users of new messages.

Seems here it's more that IRC simply hasn't caught up with the times, rather than iOS being limiting.
If I am not mistaken, IRC doesn't store and forward messages. They are all real time and joining a room after a message is sent typically means you miss the message. (I am not certain persistent rooms follow the same rules).
 

Abazigal

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If I am not mistaken, IRC doesn't store and forward messages. They are all real time and joining a room after a message is sent typically means you miss the message. (I am not certain persistent rooms follow the same rules).
My mistake then. I never used IRC before, so I am not familiar with it. Guess this just doesn't translate well to iOS then. :/
 

jamezr

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How is that any different from existing chat apps which use push notifications to notify users of new messages.

Seems here it's more that IRC simply hasn't caught up with the times, rather than iOS being limiting.
All chat/communication programs stay open and working in the background. If you could see the ones on IOS you would no doubt see email and imessage and host of other programs and protocols running in the background.
 
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mi7chy

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There's no such thing as old or new protocol. IRC uses a standard persistent TCP socket on port 6667 so other standard protocols are likely to be affected such as telnet, SSH, ftp, sftp, ftps, etc. since iOS doesn't support true multitasking for any background client or service that requires a persistent connection longer than 3 minutes (iOS 6 had a longer 10 minute limitation).

Background refresh isn't going to help nor work with an instantaneous form of communication per description below.

"iOS background refresh occurs locally on your device and is invoked by iOS at irregular intervals. This means that these notifications are not instantaneous and background refreshes occur only at times determined by iOS. If you’re wanting instant and guaranteed-reliable notifications then this feature is not for you. However, if you’re interested in receiving infrequent notifications then this feature may suit your needs."
 
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mi7chy

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Just looked up vSSH client and it lists the same iOS limitation. SSH protocol is current and used for network and server administration.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/vssh/id527244258?mt=8
"Background work (up to 3 minutes for iOS 7, up to 10 minutes for iOS 5/6, alert on timeout)"

So, back to my question. Anyone running iOS 9 beta that can confirm if this is fixed or not?
 
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diamond.g

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There's no such thing as old or new protocol. IRC uses a standard persistent TCP socket on port 6667 so other standard protocols are likely to be affected such as telnet, SSH, ftp, sftp, ftps, etc. since iOS doesn't support true multitasking for any background client or service that requires a persistent connection longer than 3 minutes (iOS 6 had a longer 10 minute limitation).

Background refresh isn't going to help nor work with an instantaneous form of communication per description below.

"iOS background refresh occurs locally on your device and is invoked by iOS at irregular intervals. This means that these notifications are not instantaneous and background refreshes occur only at times determined by iOS. If you’re wanting instant and guaranteed-reliable notifications then this feature is not for you. However, if you’re interested in receiving infrequent notifications then this feature may suit your needs."
Ah, good to know. This question may be better asked in the iOS9 forum.
 

MRU

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If I am not mistaken, IRC doesn't store and forward messages. They are all real time and joining a room after a message is sent typically means you miss the message. (I am not certain persistent rooms follow the same rules).
You can use a IRC client such as IRC Cloud that does support push messaging and you get all your messages and it works away without issue. However this is a mi7chy thread, so I assume it was created with intention of creating a fuss and to rag on IOS - so I refrained from correcting the post earlier ;) Sometimes you got to let the kids play throwing mud at some stage.
 

burgman

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You can use a IRC client such as IRC Cloud that does support push messaging and you get all your messages and it works away without issue. However this is a mi7chy thread, so I assume it was created with intention of creating a fuss and to rag on IOS - so I refrained from correcting the post earlier ;) Sometimes you got to let the kids play throwing mud at some stage.
You mean calling Apple embarrassing for IOS in background not supporting IRC from the 1980's that has lost 60% of users in a decade would be creating a fuss :)
 
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C DM

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Just looked up vSSH client and it lists the same iOS limitation. SSH protocol is current and used for network and server administration.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/vssh/id527244258?mt=8
"Background work (up to 3 minutes for iOS 7, up to 10 minutes for iOS 5/6, alert on timeout)"

So, back to my question. Anyone running iOS 9 beta that can confirm if this is fixed or not?
This isn't something that would be fixed as it's not a problem but the way iOS is designed to work: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9738488/run-app-for-more-than-10-minutes-in-background
 

mi7chy

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C DM

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Any OS within the last ten years if not longer can background multitask so iOS is broken. This is what I'm more used to:

https://forums.macrumors.com/threads/am-i-the-odd-man-out.1895797/page-2#post-21522864
Every OS is different. This is how iOS implements it. It might not make it to your liking (and perhaps to that of many others), but it doesn't make it broken since it's working as designed. Not sure how anyone who is going into using a particular OS doesn't find out about how it works and is somehow surprised and offended by it later.
 

mi7chy

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iOS is like a car without reverse gear. It's not different but broken because all other cars have working reverse gear. While it doesn't entirely stop you from using the car it is awkward and restrictive.
 
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C DM

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iOS is like a car without reverse gear. It's not different but broken because all other cars have working reverse gear. While it doesn't entirely stop you from using the car it is awkward and restrictive.
It's not like that at all. Not even sure how that even comes close to relating to this. Something that works as designed isn't broken. You might disagree with the design of it, but it's not the same thing as it being broken. If the simplicity of that reality can't be seen then it doesn't seem like discussing much more beyond that would really lead to anything meaningful or even interesting.
 

Tubamajuba

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iOS is like a car without reverse gear. It's not different but broken because all other cars have working reverse gear. While it doesn't entirely stop you from using the car it is awkward and restrictive.
It would be extremely difficult to use a car without the ability to drive in reverse. It is very, very easy to use iOS without running into the three-minute restriction. In fact, the vast majority of people that use iPhones aren't affected by that at all.

Maybe you should just go Android and ditch your iPad?
 

C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
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It would be extremely difficult to use a car without the ability to drive in reverse. It is very, very easy to use iOS without running into the three-minute restriction. In fact, the vast majority of people that use iPhones aren't affected by that at all.

Maybe you should just go Android and ditch your iPad?
In fact, as I recall, it's not even 3 minutes.
 
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