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RedTheReader

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Nov 18, 2019
505
1,230

I came across this YouTube video the other day and was intrigued, mostly because of how my own short time with Android led to a similar feeling. I say feeling though instead of conclusion because I was spending too much time trying to evaluate the form-factor (foldable) and juggle services tied to the iPhone (still had one foot in the ecosystem) to actually dig into the idiosyncrasies of iOS vs Android. But the feeling sure was there. After watching this though, I was shocked at how many of the differences pointed out would be useful to me on a daily basis. Some would be less often, but from what I remember only the Google Assistant section of the video seemed like a useless demo that I'd never use.

And upon facing that internal argument of "well those are small things… would you even care?" I had to remember that those small details are often why I upgrade to a newer iPhone. I genuinely wanted the action button because I've missed shots trying to fumble with the screen shortcut and it's just convenient in it's speed. Same with USB-C: it's just easier, and despite the small scale of the upgrades it genuinely is a big deal to me. And Apple knows this; why do you think they keep putting out these small update phones? Because people do care enough about the details to buy them. And so this argument that I wouldn't care about this small stuff in software is nonsense because the iPhone proves I absolutely would.

But that's just me. What do you all think? I think I'm not posting this in the right section to attract more devoted Apple users, but it still might be worth posting.
 
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edubfromktown

macrumors 6502a
Sep 14, 2010
737
629
East Coast, USA
Excellent points and exactly why I ditched iPhones in favor of Android devices a few years ago.

For me the Apple ecosystem has never been a big draw though I am a big fan of Mac systems at home and got other family members on the bandwagon (all of them are iPhone users).

Nearby Share works great with my Mac's.
 

Shanghaichica

macrumors G5
Apr 8, 2013
14,656
13,148
UK
I’m watching this with an open mind.

Clipboard manger looks useful.

Agree with the point about the keyboard. It would be useful to have most recently used emoji bar and number key
row.

The voice dictation was better

I’ve been complaining for years about the lack of split screen apps on iOS.
 
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Heat_Fan89

macrumors 68030
Feb 23, 2016
2,568
3,281
I’ve said it before and it’s worth repeating that Apple prioritizes hardware over software, whereas Google prioritizes software over hardware. If you want some of the best hardware paired with, exquisite design matched with an uncompromised user experience, you buy Apple.

If OTOH you want the best AI software along with some of the latest software innovations, you buy Google. For me when it comes to Android, I go with Google. I have used other Android devices and I prefer the Google brand because of Google’s software innovations.
 

edubfromktown

macrumors 6502a
Sep 14, 2010
737
629
East Coast, USA
I’ve said it before and it’s worth repeating that Apple prioritizes hardware over software, whereas Google prioritizes software over hardware. If you want some of the best hardware paired with, exquisite design matched with an uncompromised user experience, you buy Apple.

If OTOH you want the best AI software along with some of the latest software innovations, you buy Google. For me when it comes to Android, I go with Google. I have used other Android devices and I prefer the Google brand because of Google’s software innovations.
Google prioritizes camera hardware and photo app above all else (with over saturated results to some extent). As with my DSLR, there are trade-offs and by the same token I've learned how to make the most out of other mobile phone hardware. For purely effortless point and shoot, Pixel is #1.

In other areas it is the same old conundrum: Google development continues swerving all over the place and can't seem to jettison the bureaucratic nonsense that has plagued them for decades. They finally appear to have "grown up" in delivering more reliable Android and ChromeOS updates over the past few years. It has been a long and ugly road to get there (and Apple has nailed that process for years by comparison).

Some of the updates on both Android and ChromeOS platforms have been less than stellar to put it mildly. The delayed Android trickle down to OnePlus, Samsung and others lessend the blow of some of their "rush to market" bugs.

I've never been a Samsung fan and have owned nothing manufactured by them other than a few of flash drives. The S23+ tempted me this time mostly based on getting nearly $400 discount with no trade-in. The other reason I figured it was worth checking out: Apple is shedding developers and some of the top-notch ones have migrated to Samsung.

Samsung hardware components and manufacturing are higher quality compared to past Google Pixel offerings. I have not laid eyes on or hands on an 8 or 8P so far.

At least some add-ons to "pure Android" are quite useful. For me it boils down to more polish in the form of alternative apps (that one can choose to use or hide/disable), added customization capabilities/ease of use and possibly better support too.

Downsides of going with Samsung: removal of bloatware takes some effort (that I have scripted) and other than carrier lock-in purchase/trade-in incentives, BYOD with pre-paid MVNO plans requires patience to find a decent deal.
 
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Ludatyk

macrumors 603
May 27, 2012
5,700
4,763
Texas
The problem is there’s also many things where iOS will save me time and effort, it’s just two different flavours which have different pros and cons.
Can I get an example? I like the iPhone no doubt about it, but its strength come from how well it’s integrated into Apple ecosystem… but iOS standalone, it’s restricted in terms of many things you can do with it.
 

NT1440

macrumors G5
May 18, 2008
14,917
21,772
I have my whole family on my Apple account to guarantee they’re being backed up because I can’t trust them to do it.

Personally, if Apple doesn’t release another mini iPhone in 4-6 years when my 13 mini is end of useful life, I’ll shop for a small Android device.
 

ofarlig

macrumors 6502a
Jun 23, 2015
891
1,092
Sweden
Can I get an example? I like the iPhone no doubt about it, but its strength come from how well it’s integrated into Apple ecosystem… but iOS standalone, it’s restricted in terms of many things you can do with it.

The big one is setup in general, if I setup a new phone phone I expect notifications to be off by default and me having to allow the apps I want notifications from to give it to me, the same goes for tracking and such things. Whenever I switch over to Android I always have to spend time turning off loads of things.

Slide over on my iPads is one thing, for some things that is just the most efficient way of accessing them. Restoring from cloud backups when switching devices or factory resetting the one I have is another one. Being able to scan documents straight to pdf from the Files app, on my Fold I had to use some third part app if I wanted more than one page in it. Authenticator code autofill if you use KeyChain as your authenticator is another one.

iOS also comes with overall better support from third party things, when I’ve been using Android I always run into something where Android isn’t supported. Of course there are other things where Android will be more capable but as I said, pros and cons with both options.
 
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Ludatyk

macrumors 603
May 27, 2012
5,700
4,763
Texas
The big one is setup in general, if I setup a new phone phone I expect notifications to be off by default and me having to allow the apps I want notifications from to give it to me, the same goes for tracking and such things. Whenever I switch over to Android I always have to spend time turning off loads of things.
I'm not following you on this... for example, whenever you go into an app its going to ask whether or not you want a notification. That applies for both iOS and Android... apps don't automatically send you a notification if you don't enable it (or maybe I could be wrong).

And if you ever receive a notification.. go into the notification center (not settings) and tap that specific alert to disable without having to spend time turning off things.

Being able to scan documents straight to pdf from the Files app, on my Fold I had to use some third part app if I wanted more than one page in it.
There's a document scanner built into the camera app on my Galaxy Fold... and I can easily view documents from the My Files app. I don't need a third party app to get it done.

iOS also comes with overall better support from third party things, when I’ve been using Android I always run into something where Android isn’t supported.
Completely agree... when it comes to 3rd party support. The iPhone is the default option.

Of course there are other things where Android will be more capable but as I said, pros and cons with both options.
I understand there's pros and cons, but the way you phrased it iOS can save you more time compared to Android. And I disagree with that. I would argue... there's more things you can do on Android than on iOS, which results in saving you more time.
 
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ofarlig

macrumors 6502a
Jun 23, 2015
891
1,092
Sweden
I'm not following you on this... for example, whenever you go into an app its going to ask whether or not you want a notification. That applies for both iOS and Android... apps don't automatically send you a notification if you don't enable it (or maybe I could be wrong).

And if you ever receive a notification.. go into the notification center (not settings) and tap that specific alert to disable without having to spend time turning off things.


There's a document scanner built into the camera app on my Galaxy Fold... and I can easily view documents from the My Files app. I don't need a third party app to get it done.


Completely agree... when it comes to 3rd party support. The iPhone is the default option.


I understand there's pros and cons, but the way you phrased it iOS can save you more time compared to Android. And I disagree with that. I would argue... there's more things you can do on Android than on iOS, which results in saving you more time.

No, many things are turned on by default on Android and you have to turn them off, Apple does it the opposite way. Unless they completely changed it since I last used Android a couple of years ago.

The document scanner in the camera app doesn’t do multiple pages in the same pdf. At least it didn’t the last time I used it.

I haven’t really ran into being limited by iOS at all in the past 7 years or so, before that yeah there were some things.Whenever I’ve been on Android I haven’t found anything more I can do with it. There’s a lot more I am forced to configure to not get disturbed by ads from stuff like Galaxy Store or random notifications though. And having to hunt for third party apps for things that should be standard, like scanning a multi page document.
 

RedTheReader

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Nov 18, 2019
505
1,230
Nearby Share works great with my Mac's.
Can you explain this? About t the only real "ecosystem" feature I use is AirDrop and Universal Clipboard (AirPlay if you count my Apple TV, but that's something I'll eventually switch to an Android TV box for).

While I'm willing to give up the second, I really do need AirDrop to work. I've heard about the desktop app by Google for Nearby Share, but I thought it was only released for Windows. It being Mac compatible would remove a big barrier to entry.
 

JuicyGoomba

macrumors member
May 20, 2021
98
289
No, many things are turned on by default on Android and you have to turn them off, Apple does it the opposite way. Unless they completely changed it since I last used Android a couple of years ago.

The document scanner in the camera app doesn’t do multiple pages in the same pdf. At least it didn’t the last time I used it.

I haven’t really ran into being limited by iOS at all in the past 7 years or so, before that yeah there were some things.Whenever I’ve been on Android I haven’t found anything more I can do with it. There’s a lot more I am forced to configure to not get disturbed by ads from stuff like Galaxy Store or random notifications though. And having to hunt for third party apps for things that should be standard, like scanning a multi page document.
Ah so what you're actually talking about is your experience with a SAMSUNG phone, not Android.

It's okay, in some backwards countries like the USA most of the population equate Samsung to Android.

Samsung's abomination is software cancer. The sooner Google take more market share the better, and maybe finally people will start to realise that most normal Android skins are nothing like the horrendous mess that Samsung ships.

Fact is, for many years now a Pixel/OnePlus/Motorola and many more have been far easier to setup and configure than any iPhone. You sign in to Google, setup literally asks you what apps you want installing along the way, what wallpaper you want, etc etc, basically all of the things that you would have to dig into iOS' awful mess of a Settings app to configure when setting up an iPhone from scratch.

When I set up a Pixel, I can go barebones with only SMS/Email/Web if I want. Very quickly and easily.

When I set up an iPhone, it gives the illusion that everything is setup correctly. Queue the spam for iCloud backups, oh wait we backed up your backup too many times please upgrade your iCloud storage because we DONT WANT TO TELL YOU HOW TO FIX IT GIVE US MONEY INSTEAD. Oh have you tried Apple news yet? Hey, pick up your phone Siri has a suggestion for you. Unable to backup Photos to iCloud. Hey, have you enabled Apple Pay yet? Apple Pay, enable it now. Do it. Why haven't you enabled Apple Pay yet? Please turn on iCloud backup now. iCloud storage is full. But have you heard about Apple Pay yet? It's really convenient to use, please turn it on.

The only notification I get after setting up a Pixel is "Do you want to finish setting up your phone now?". You get it once. It's a simple reminder to make sure that you set everything up correctly the first time round so that you don't have to dig into the settings. It's user friendly and not fishing for your $$$ like almost every notification I get when setting up an iPhone the first time. Power users don't need this extra reminder, but anyone using a Pixel for the first time it's very useful. Most people just want a wallpaper settings, download their apps, and leave it at that. iPhone nags and nags and nags until it either gets your $$$ or more technologically inclined people go ham and start deleting and disabling "features".
 

edubfromktown

macrumors 6502a
Sep 14, 2010
737
629
East Coast, USA
Can you explain this? About t the only real "ecosystem" feature I use is AirDrop and Universal Clipboard (AirPlay if you count my Apple TV, but that's something I'll eventually switch to an Android TV box for).

While I'm willing to give up the second, I really do need AirDrop to work. I've heard about the desktop app by Google for Nearby Share, but I thought it was only released for Windows. It being Mac compatible would remove a big barrier to entry.
"Nearby Share" (Near Drop) is an open source version of Apple's proprietary utility that works flawlessly for transferring files from an Android phone (or Chromebook) to a Mac. I use Google Keep for everything else (and began syncing "Apple" contacts to Google long before I ditched iPhones).

There is nothing I need from the Apple "ecosystem". I have a Studio Base Max (current OS and patch level), 2020 i5 10th gen 13" MBP (Catalina) and 2015 m3 12" MacBook (Mojave) that are all awesome for my needs and integrate well with my Android 13 phone.
 
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ofarlig

macrumors 6502a
Jun 23, 2015
891
1,092
Sweden
Ah so what you're actually talking about is your experience with a SAMSUNG phone, not Android.

It's okay, in some backwards countries like the USA most of the population equate Samsung to Android.

Samsung's abomination is software cancer. The sooner Google take more market share the better, and maybe finally people will start to realise that most normal Android skins are nothing like the horrendous mess that Samsung ships.

Fact is, for many years now a Pixel/OnePlus/Motorola and many more have been far easier to setup and configure than any iPhone. You sign in to Google, setup literally asks you what apps you want installing along the way, what wallpaper you want, etc etc, basically all of the things that you would have to dig into iOS' awful mess of a Settings app to configure when setting up an iPhone from scratch.

When I set up a Pixel, I can go barebones with only SMS/Email/Web if I want. Very quickly and easily.

When I set up an iPhone, it gives the illusion that everything is setup correctly. Queue the spam for iCloud backups, oh wait we backed up your backup too many times please upgrade your iCloud storage because we DONT WANT TO TELL YOU HOW TO FIX IT GIVE US MONEY INSTEAD. Oh have you tried Apple news yet? Hey, pick up your phone Siri has a suggestion for you. Unable to backup Photos to iCloud. Hey, have you enabled Apple Pay yet? Apple Pay, enable it now. Do it. Why haven't you enabled Apple Pay yet? Please turn on iCloud backup now. iCloud storage is full. But have you heard about Apple Pay yet? It's really convenient to use, please turn it on.

The only notification I get after setting up a Pixel is "Do you want to finish setting up your phone now?". You get it once. It's a simple reminder to make sure that you set everything up correctly the first time round so that you don't have to dig into the settings. It's user friendly and not fishing for your $$$ like almost every notification I get when setting up an iPhone the first time. Power users don't need this extra reminder, but anyone using a Pixel for the first time it's very useful. Most people just want a wallpaper settings, download their apps, and leave it at that. iPhone nags and nags and nags until it either gets your $$$ or more technologically inclined people go ham and start deleting and disabling "features".

Samsung sells the most phones so if you are looking at the average Android experience statistically you will end up closer to that than the Pixel one. The premium segment becomes even more Samsung based so their skin is representative of Android at this point.

If you were to compare iOS to Pixels instead of to Android the results might be different. I don’t know because Google just started selling them here officially last year so they are a very new and small market, and at that point I was not interested in anything but foldables if I were to have something other than iOS. And they still don’t sell the Pixel Fold here, otherwise I would have probably gotten one of those.
 
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gpat

macrumors 68000
Mar 1, 2011
1,885
5,116
Italy
Samsung's abomination is software cancer. The sooner Google take more market share the better, and maybe finally people will start to realise that most normal Android skins are nothing like the horrendous mess that Samsung ships.

Samsung's One UI is light years ahead compared to any other mobile OS in 2023, Android or not.
Wouldn't bother with anything else.
 

edubfromktown

macrumors 6502a
Sep 14, 2010
737
629
East Coast, USA
Samsung's One UI is light years ahead compared to any other mobile OS in 2023, Android or not.
Wouldn't bother with anything else.
I've used Linux since the 1990's and would say OS X / macOS vs other *nix operating systems is ironically similar in that regard. Apple hardware for an end-user desktop/laptop experience has no equal. Mobile phones, not so much ;)

Never considered a Samsung phone until the price was within striking distance of reasonable for me to have a go at it.
 

gpat

macrumors 68000
Mar 1, 2011
1,885
5,116
Italy
I've used Linux since the 1990's and would say OS X / macOS vs other *nix operating systems is ironically similar in that regard. Apple hardware for an end-user desktop/laptop experience has no equal. Mobile phones, not so much ;)

Never considered a Samsung phone until the price was within striking distance of reasonable for me to have a go at it.

I know, right? One UI gives you so much power and possibilities at your fingertips, in such an elegant way, much like OSX does. (It will always be OSX to me).
For old school Apple users, One UI could feel more like an Apple product than iOS does.
Yes, there is some bloat, but nowhere as much as the old times.
 

840quadra

Moderator
Staff member
Feb 1, 2005
9,268
5,985
Twin Cities Minnesota
Many of his issues are valid, but a significant portion is caused by how he is ignorant in how to properly activate some settings on iOS, or how to interact with it.

My Comments below

  1. Clipboard manager is super Meh. Continuity between my devices kills my need for this. Using the camera to make a copy of a barcode or serial number and pasting into a file on my Mac is a gamechanger (personal and work computers are Mac). Granted this is a walled garden thing, but one I am happy to accept.
  1. Copy and share images - fair points, but overall Meh.
  2. Voice text and reply - He is doing it wrong IMO, while it is getting into the assistant realm, use Siri, and use proper commands.
  3. Split Screen. - ZERO idea why Apple hasn’t implemented this and permitted this. FAR FAR FAR superior processors and they still don’t let us do this.
  4. This is a limitation of the app more than the OS (Zoom). Much of this functionality (and more) exists on FaceTime and apps that work better with iOS
  5. Notification icons at top status bar (Fair point but Meh). Often times I don’t know what the icon is for, and I have to swipe down to understand what I am being notified about. This is a valid complaint as he (later) complains about not knowing what control center icons are in iOS.
  6. Smart replies - If the smart replies ever had text I found useful I would care about this. Google continues to guess wrong what I want to say in smart replies. On Apple Watch, Apple does a better job in this department for me, even compared to my pixel watch
  7. Notification Center. Sorry IOS wins this. I always need to double swipe down on Android and often times over to get the action I want to enact. Why can’t I have all controls on one screen and use a different gesture for notifications versus Controls? How is it Apple’s fault that he doesn’t know what the icons / buttons are? Does he get a tutorial for every new Emoji too?
  8. Springboard / Home Screen needs an update on iOS for sure.
  9. Widgets have been updated and now interactive in iOS so most of his points are now moot.
  10. Assistant help. I am often frustrated with the supposedly superior “google assistant”. It is better, but not by as wide of a margin as people say / claim. Perhaps it is a little user error on my part, but I have google home, HomePods, Android and Siri and have since the Pixel 2.

Nice thing is we have choice in our phones, is it is great that there are options.
 

gpat

macrumors 68000
Mar 1, 2011
1,885
5,116
Italy
Please elaborate. Not for debate reasons, but I am a pure Android user and don't have / own Samsung.

I actually kinda did in the subsequent post.
I love the number of options I can get in the palm of my hand.

I have personal profile + work profile + secure folder on my S23U, totaling 3 possible profiles for each app.
Physical dual SIM + eSIM support, totaling 3 numbers at my disposal anytime (I could have more if I needed).

Good gallery app on top of Google Photos.
Probably the best dialer around.
S-Pen for signing PDFs in seconds. Also a good choice of notetaking apps even if not iPad-level.

Incredibly versatile camera compartment, probably won't be the absolute best in every department but the versatility really trumps it for me.

Samsung DEX can be used in tandem with my Xreal Air VR glasses, for unparalleled media consumption on the go, meanwhile Pixels require root to enable any form of video out, and that's really the most absurd of limitations to me in 2023.

Amazing customization options between One UI and Good Lock, without resorting to third-party apps.

I don't mean to sound like a fanboy, I really hate that Samsung doesn't take foldables as seriously as they should, and Pixels entice me mainly for the prospect of running GrapheneOS.

But as an effortless daily driver, I really find that my S23U is hard to be rivaled.
 

840quadra

Moderator
Staff member
Feb 1, 2005
9,268
5,985
Twin Cities Minnesota
I actually kinda did in the subsequent post.
I love the number of options I can get in the palm of my hand.

I have personal profile + work profile + secure folder on my S23U, totaling 3 possible profiles for each app.
Physical dual SIM + eSIM support, totaling 3 numbers at my disposal anytime (I could have more if I needed).

Good gallery app on top of Google Photos.
Probably the best dialer around.
S-Pen for signing PDFs in seconds. Also a good choice of notetaking apps even if not iPad-level.

Incredibly versatile camera compartment, probably won't be the absolute best in every department but the versatility really trumps it for me.

Samsung DEX can be used in tandem with my Xreal Air VR glasses, for unparalleled media consumption on the go, meanwhile Pixels require root to enable any form of video out, and that's really the most absurd of limitations to me in 2023.

Amazing customization options between One UI and Good Lock, without resorting to third-party apps.

I don't mean to sound like a fanboy, I really hate that Samsung doesn't take foldables as seriously as they should, and Pixels entice me mainly for the prospect of running GrapheneOS.

But as an effortless daily driver, I really find that my S23U is hard to be rivaled.
Some fair points for sure.

In my use case some are moot as I refuse to have work / personal devices share any hardware at all, ever. That said, Dex not having a native Google equivalent is absurd here and now, I can actually do more on the newest iPhones with an external display than my Flagship Google phone.

You are entirely free to be a fan of what you like and I can appreciate how awesome that device is for you for sure!

Thanks for sharing.
 

gpat

macrumors 68000
Mar 1, 2011
1,885
5,116
Italy
Some fair points for sure.

In my use case some are moot as I refuse to have work / personal devices share any hardware at all, ever. That said, Dex not having a native Google equivalent is absurd here and now, I can actually do more on the newest iPhones with an external display than my Flagship Google phone.

You are entirely free to be a fan of what you like and I can appreciate how awesome that device is for you for sure!

Thanks for sharing.

Of course I had pleasure in elaborating those points for you.

The #1 reason for me to use Android instead of iOS, is knowing that I can just have a device in my pocket and have my whole digital life sorted out, at least outside of desktop-only workflows.

Now that I think about it, S-Pen really shines also as a TeamViewer input device, so if I have to check or run something quick on my desktop, it can be done. Of course it would be even better if Samsung was serious about foldables.

Having different devices for work and personal usage is a headache for me. But to each their own, I understand the merits in the opposite choice and just wanting a pure Google ecosystem.
 
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