iOS7: Stretching bitmaps is unacceptable

Discussion in 'iOS 7' started by cleo1, Jul 16, 2013.

  1. cleo1 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2013
    #1
    This is not a matter of taste. This is quantifiable: Upscaling bitmaps incurs resolution loss and thus is a design no-no. Yet this is how the parallax and folder effects are achieved. Rather than being meticulously hand-rendered in Photoshop (the Forestall method), iOS 7 is mostly vector-based, allowing for unlimited scalability. Which is good. Great, in fact (think 20 different iPhone sizes). But until we have vector background images as well, the workaround is to require images larger than the screen area with a specified minimum amount of wiggle room. The irony is when you provide a large enough image it still stretches it (this isn't a bug, it is an intentionally defined value with a known location).
     
  2. teknikal90 macrumors 68030

    teknikal90

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #2
    i agree. i noticed this too mostly on the stars background (default still background). however, what folder effects?
     
  3. cleo1 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jul 16, 2013
    #3
    I should add, all the old 114px icons (which is most, at this point) are being upscaled to the new 120px size for a particularly disharmonious, lo-res effect. Although in this case it may be a deliberate incentive to get devs to update their icons/apps asap. I mean, why else add 6px?

    ----------

    Sorry. I meant the background zoom in the folder animation! I should have been more specific.
     
  4. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    #4
    Formats that allow for pyramid texture levels have existed for many years in other things related to computer graphics, a common approach being mipmaps. There's no reason it couldn't call a higher resolution graphic. I wouldn't call meticulous rendering the forestall method. It was probably a case of what ran well on the hardware. Vectors will take more cpu power.
     
  5. cleo1 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jul 16, 2013
    #5
    Re: Pyramid
    Even the best resynthesis algorithms clean things up a bit at best, while introducing their own artifacts. There will always be a net resolution loss, which is acceptable for transitions but not static backgrounds. And I agree that the processing power is weak still, which is why introducing a vector interface coincides perfectly with the new minimal design trend. And as Forestallism inevitably returns to vogue, and buttons and such are reintroduced, I'm sure the hardware will follow suit ;)
     
  6. Rogifan macrumors P6

    Rogifan

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2011
    #6
    So I suspect you'll be sending a note to Tim Cook letting him know how unacceptable this is? :)
     
  7. cleo1 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jul 16, 2013
    #7
    No need. That's what these forums are for. If an idea carries weight it will be heavily discussed and in turn, paid close attention by Apple's tech forum analysts. The heavy/light font debate is a perfect example. Geek feedback is at least articulated and impassioned—sure everyone has an opinion but very few submit theirs. Ours are the premium leads.
     
  8. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    #8
    I haven't previewed ios 7. Are we talking about things that can be freely zoomed or where there are 2 basic sizes? There's no reason they can't store multiple resolution levels with bitmaps, as as you know vectors scale well assuming the person knows how to control them. Otherwise beziers can develop kinks even in 2 dimensions.
     
  9. cleo1 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2013
    #9
    You mean like icon sizes in OS X? Where technically you can submit a single image and allow it to be scaled but the more professional solution would be to render and hand-de-artifact each zoom level, as Apple encourages and requires for App Store submissions? That would be an excellent solution, which would also expand the boutique niche for professionally designed wallpapers.
     

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