iPad 3 Resolution and Stylus

Discussion in 'iPad' started by Frankied22, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. Frankied22 macrumors 68000

    Frankied22

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    I have posted before on my belief that we may yet see Apple introduce an Apple-designed note taking app or an Apple-designed stylus at the iPad 3 announcement. With the company pushing into the education world with full force they have to have realized by now that when it comes to using the iPad as a replacement for pen and paper it falls short. Being forced to use your finger or the plethora of fat tipped stylus' out there you soon find that it does not work well enough or intuitively enough to replace good old pen and paper. I know Steve Jobs had his famous saying that pretty much denied any usefulness of a stylus but Steve Jobs' statements have sometimes been reversed. So just as during the iPad 2 announcement they dedicated part of it to somethig as trivial as a new case that had magnets, we may see some time dedicated to announcing a stylus or an improvement in stylus technology. My question about this though is: if the resolution of the iPad 3 is to be believed, would that make the current stylus' work better since there are more pixels on the screen?
     
  2. zp3dd4 macrumors member

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    Jun 21, 2009
    #2
    yes, definitely, I think the resolution on the ipad 2 is holding styluses back a lot since it just doesn't display accurately enough.
     
  3. deeddawg macrumors 604

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    US
    #3
    Gosh I hope you're being sarcastic. I don't quite know where to begin to respond, other than to say screen resolution has nothing to do whatsoever with the accuracy of the touch sensor.

    What holds styli back on the ipad/ipad2 is the capacitive touch sensing technology as it requires a fairly big big "something" to think is a finger and doesn't handle a fine-tip very well. Resistive touch sensing does better in that capacity, but doesn't work as nicely with fingers since you have to press relatively hard.
     
  4. Frankied22 thread starter macrumors 68000

    Frankied22

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    Ah well that is disappointing. Here's to hoping we see an announcement of some new screen technology in the iPad 3. Although I doubt it because wouldn't that be something we would be seeing in the rumors or in the display MacRumors got their hands on?
     
  5. tehBrad macrumors regular

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    Mar 9, 2011
    #5
    Didn't apple integrate a pressure sensitive sensor in the ipad2's screen? Coz I know you could press down harder in garage band and get a louder sound, maybe they could start there and then make some sort of stylus that works. I'm not technically inclined tho and know capacitie screenS require heat to work.
     
  6. Stetrain macrumors 68040

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    Feb 6, 2009
    #6
    The resolution of the touch sensor layer is not tied to the resolution of the display.

    The effect of 'pressure sensitivity' seen in Garage Band is just using the accelerometer to detect how much the device gets jarred when you touch it.
     
  7. spinedoc77 macrumors G3

    spinedoc77

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    Jun 11, 2009
    #7
    Ten one designs has a video floating around where they successfully had one of their stylus write with pressure sensitivity on an ipad, they were going to try to have Apple give them the ok to use the private function, but then nothing ever happened with it. Some have theorized that they just used a larger contact area as you pressed harder against the stylus and it flattened out more, but it's still interesting.

    http://tenonedesign.com/blog/pressure-sensitive-drawing-on-ipad/

    I agree that Apple really needs to increase the resolution of the touch sensor.
     

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