iPad as first Apple product

Discussion in 'iPad' started by MacMarf, Apr 5, 2010.

  1. MacMarf macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    #1
    So yeah, I have never owned an Apple product. Yes money was an issue ;) And the iPod and iPhone's screens just looked to small for me, so it became a macbook. Which was too expensive, now there is the iPad :D So yeah end April it's coming to Germany, which is the nearest country it will come to next to mine ( Netherlands). Now, I was wondering how exactly do I get credit for apps and thing like that? And if I buy it in Germany will I be able to get Dutch books from the iBookstore? I know my questions may be stupid, but I dont know the answer, so I hope you could help!
    Thanks!
     
  2. JonnyIreland macrumors 6502a

    JonnyIreland

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2010
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #2
    Hup Holland Hup!

    I'm not sure about your questions about Dutch books, I think you might be able to use the Kindle App for that, at least until a Dutch iBooks Store is launched.

    Save hard, you won't regret buying Apple. :)
     
  3. undrpsi macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Location:
    Gastonia, NC
    #3
    I have no idea...but...do you have an Apple store near you? They have resources to local user groups or they can find out for you. If you have itunes and iTunes cards in you country...that's it. You use basically the same storefront to purchase apps. As far as iBooks...I don't know. My UK buddies talk about licensing issues with BBC and the rest of the European Union...but I don't know. That's why you need to find the Apple Store in your country..you can call or email them your questions.

    Good Luck!
     
  4. MacMarf thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    #4
    Okay, thanks guys. I'll just ask the friendly person behind the desk in Germany when (IF) I am going to buy it if that is possible. Shame on me, but never used iTunes either :eek: If it is not possible I'll just wait till it is available in the Netherlands. Going there start of may, pads will be coming there end of April, so if I am lucky I'll still get one, if it is possible to buy dutch books etc, I speak both languages, but Dutch is easier and more pleasurable (< word?) to read for me.
     
  5. FotoDirk macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    #5
    Please don't forget that the iPAD is not replacing a computer, laptop or notebook. It is supplementing it. You need a computer with iTunes 9.1 on to activate the iPad.

    There might be a chance that no iBook store for Dutch books will be made available. At this moment the iBook store is only available for US customers.

    It is the same with video content and TV shows. This is already existing for a longer time and not available in the Netherlands. So you cannot be sure that Apple will start supporting iBooks in Dutch.

    You can fool the system and create an Apple-ID with a fictive address in the US, and then you can connect to the US-iTunes-store and the US-iBooks-store. But that will not give you the possibility to download Dutch content.
     
  6. MacMarf thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    #6
    Well, I got a laptop, so that wouldn't be a problem. Reading US books isn't a problem then I guess. I am a bit worries about the video aspect though. Are there no dutch/german etc. video's available? Will they come with the launch? And let's say I buy the iPad in Germany, i will download the german iBookstore, can I afterwards still download the dutch one? Sorry for that much questions, just wanted to make sure.
     
  7. FotoDirk macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    #7
    The store is the same independent from where you bought the product or use it. But to use it you must create an Apple-ID. This thing contains your personal details like name and address.
    With the address the system knows from which country you are and then you get a kind of filter on the content for that country. And not all books, video content will be available for all countries.

    One of the reasons is because publishers might have odd rules for porting content from one country to another one. It is about time to change this behavior but as long as the old-school mechanisms can control it, they will.
    It actually will mean that the same book (even in English) might cost more money in the Netherlands then in the US.
     

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