iPad Pro iPad Pro (2018) 11 inch Charging queries?

legionsunited

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 12, 2018
31
5
Localhost
My friend from Australia is on vacation on India and is selling an iPad. Now the wall sockets in India and Australia are different. So, the iPad 18W USB C charger doesn't go to the wall socket directly. So, he has this cheap 3rd party convertor which he 1st plugs his USB C Charger into that male female convertor and then plug that convertor to the wall socket in India.

Now my concern is - Does this set up anyhow leads to voltage fluctuation, overheating, damage circuitry and lead to possible fire down the line/long time use?

Also, what other options are available to charge iPad Pro safely.

P.S - The official 18W USB C adapter is not available in India as of now.
 

MacDevil7334

macrumors 65816
Oct 15, 2011
1,141
1,338
Austin TX
My friend from Australia is on vacation on India and is selling an iPad. Now the wall sockets in India and Australia are different. So, the iPad 18W USB C charger doesn't go to the wall socket directly. So, he has this cheap 3rd party convertor which he 1st plugs his USB C Charger into that male female convertor and then plug that convertor to the wall socket in India.

Now my concern is - Does this set up anyhow leads to voltage fluctuation, overheating, damage circuitry and lead to possible fire down the line/long time use?

Also, what other options are available to charge iPad Pro safely.

P.S - The official 18W USB C adapter is not available in India as of now.
The 18W adapter accepts an input of 100-240V and 50-60Hz. The Indian grid is 230V at 50Hz so it should be fine to plug it in with the simple adapter.
 

Krevnik

macrumors 68040
Sep 8, 2003
3,239
646
So there will be no issues at all, even in the long run?
There shouldn't be, no. The convertors for a long time have been dumb adaptors for the plugs, and not doing anything but wiring up the different prongs. It's also incredibly common that AC->DC power supplies are shared across all regions to save costs and make manufacturing easier. It's not that difficult to design a circuit that can handle the voltage range (it's all regulated down to 9V anyways), and while it takes a little finesse to design a circuit that can handle both 50Hz and 60Hz AC as input, it's still college-level circuit design.

As long as the charger itself says it accepts the input, it will be fine. The input/output specs are generally etched onto, or part of a sticker on the power supply or charger. Mostly because there may be some older chargers that weren't built this way back from before global trade had become so integrated into manufacturing.
 

legionsunited

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 12, 2018
31
5
Localhost
There shouldn't be, no. The convertors for a long time have been dumb adaptors for the plugs, and not doing anything but wiring up the different prongs. It's also incredibly common that AC->DC power supplies are shared across all regions to save costs and make manufacturing easier. It's not that difficult to design a circuit that can handle the voltage range (it's all regulated down to 9V anyways), and while it takes a little finesse to design a circuit that can handle both 50Hz and 60Hz AC as input, it's still college-level circuit design.

As long as the charger itself says it accepts the input, it will be fine. The input/output specs are generally etched onto, or part of a sticker on the power supply or charger. Mostly because there may be some older chargers that weren't built this way back from before global trade had become so integrated into manufacturing.


thanks a lot.