iPad Resolution Question

Discussion in 'iPad' started by MiraMar7, Oct 30, 2016.

  1. MiraMar7 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2016
    #1
    I’m a unsure how screen resolution really works so would appreciate any comments to help clarify.

    I have an original iPad with 1024 x 768 resolution. I use the iPad only occasionally and now want to buy an iPad Pro 9.7 with 2048 x 1536 resolution so I can watch HD TV & movie content in higher quality when away from home.

    Using Blu-rays I can create heaps of TV show episodes with 1200 x 900 resolution. These episodes look OK on my original iPad considering the iPad must be scaling the resolution down to 1024 x 768. You would think with an iPad Pro now being able to display the full 1200 x 900 resolution there would be a big improvement in quality.

    However, I have read an online article which states there is barely any noticeable difference watching HD content on a 1024 x 768 screen compared to a 2048 x 1536 screen. A 1024 x 768 screen can only display a maximum of 786,432 pixels. A 1200 x 900 TV show playing on an iPad Pro is displaying 1,080,000 pixels.

    Considering this is a pixel increase of 37% being displayed on the same size 9.7" screen, how can this not translate into a clearly superior quality image on the iPad Pro? How am I misunderstanding this difference in resolution vs picture quality?
     
  2. Patcell macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2016
    Location:
    Bergen County, NJ
    #2
    Yes, the current iPads will show more detail, no question. I think the issue is the viewing distance... You'd have to be watching with your eyes very close to a 9.7 inch screen in order for your eyes to interpret the difference in detail.

    Aside from this though, there are many reasons to consider an upgrade to a newer iPad over the original 2010 model. For watching movies and general tasks, I think the iPad Air 2 is an excellent choice even in 2016. The Air 2 can be had cheaply when sales are going on. The iPad Pro is way expensive for movie only use, IMO. Others may disagree fiercely.
     

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