iPad Stocks in China Dwindle as Kids Switch to E-Learning Amid Coronavirus-Related School Closures

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iPad stocks are reportedly running low in China because parents are buying them to help with e-learning at home in response to school closures relating to the coronavirus outbreak.


Nikkei Asian Review today reports that labor shortages have also seen suppliers struggle to meet production demands, amid government-imposed restrictions in an attempt to curb the spread of the virus.
"Later the need surged even higher when China opened schools but asked students to take the courses online," one person familiar with the situation said. "The shortage of the iPad range is up to four weeks of waiting, especially for the cheaper models. The supply could not meet the pace of the demand at all."
Today, Apple's regional online store for China shows a three to four week delivery time for orders of the low-cost 10.2-inch iPad, while anyone ordering a 12.9-inch iPad Pro will have a wait of up to two weeks.

Demand is said to have been rising since January when Beijing imposed quarantine measures. One source told Nikkei that Apple recently ordered a 20 percent increase in production of iPads for the first half of this year, compared with the production forecast it gave suppliers in January, prior to the outbreak.

In Wuhan, where the outbreak began, schools are closed, and children have been using an Alibaba-owned corporate app called DingTalk to attend classes remotely. At least 50 million students are reportedly now taking classes online using the app, which would go a long way to explaining the strong demand for iPads.

Typically this would be positive news for Apple, but with suppliers severely affected by the spread of the coronavirus, the company has been unable to keep iPad stocks plentiful. Conversely, Apple has been unable to match 2019's iPhone sales figures across China, with fewer than 500,000 iPhones sold last month amid the ongoing curbs on travel and transport, according to government data.

Apple told investors in February that it wouldn't meet its revenue guidance for the quarter because of the impact from the epidemic.

The company closed all 42 of its retail stores in China at the beginning of February as the outbreak worsened, but most of the stores have re-opened, although many are operating with shortened hours. New infections and deaths reported in China have steadily declined in recent weeks, suggesting the enforced movement restrictions are having an impact on the spread of the disease.

Article Link: iPad Stocks in China Dwindle as Kids Switch to E-Learning Amid Coronavirus-Related School Closures
 
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iPadified

macrumors 6502a
Apr 25, 2017
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I wonder if the Coronavirus will push e-learning and video conference calls so it will be more common and perhaps change our sometimes old fashioned means to communicate. I heard the prime ministers of EU met via video link the other day - really good idea. Safe, quick, cheap and with minimal CO2 footprint. Quick, cheap and low CO2 footprint was apparently not sufficient arguments for using video calls. Does say a lot about the human nature.
 

sinsin07

macrumors 68040
Mar 28, 2009
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Would be interesting to compare iPad availability and demand as opposed to Samsung and Xiaomi tablet demand.
 
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recoil80

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Jul 16, 2014
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I wonder if the Coronavirus will push e-learning and video conference calls so it will be more common and perhaps change our sometimes old fashioned means to communicate. I heard the prime ministers of EU met via video link the other day - really good idea. Safe, quick, cheap and with minimal CO2 footprint. Quick, cheap and low CO2 footprint was apparently not sufficient arguments for using video calls. Does say a lot about the human nature.
Hopefully business travels will be reduced from now on. Saves time and money, and is good for the environment. Travel should be mostly for leisure like going on vacation or getting back home to spend time with your family when you live abroad.
I only seldom meet my customers, maybe once a year. Nowadays you can easily share your screen and have a video call, why waste time stuck in traffic or on public transportation to reach your customer's HQ?
 

Abazigal

macrumors G5
Jul 18, 2011
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Hopefully business travels will be reduced from now on. Saves time and money, and is good for the environment. Travel should be mostly for leisure like going on vacation or getting back home to spend time with your family when you live abroad.
I only seldom meet my customers, maybe once a year. Nowadays you can easily share your screen and have a video call, why waste time stuck in traffic or on public transportation to reach your customer's HQ?
The simple answer to that is that not everything can be moved online.

In the case of Apple, their executives frequently travel to China to ensure that the proper processes are adopted when manufacturing their products. This is not something which can be monitored online via a webcam.

Some things are still better done in person.
 

nicho

macrumors 68040
Feb 15, 2008
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Would be interesting to compare iPad availability and demand as opposed to Samsung and Xiaomi tablet demand.
The most recent xiaomi tablet is also sold out in official channels. As is basically every logitech webcam under the equivalent of US$150.

Surface Go is readily available though.
 
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shigzeo

macrumors 6502a
Dec 14, 2005
697
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Japan
This doesnt suprise me. IT Businesses will profit from any kind of virus.
People wont come together like they used to and meetings will be held online.
We live in a cynical world of material and greed, where the enemy is the traditional. And the traditional is the human as the organisation and collaboration of humans with other humans, face to face.
 

rpmurray

macrumors 6502
Feb 21, 2017
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654
Back End of Beyond
This could be a win-win for the Chinese government. With more people working or going to school online and all homegrown applications having backdoors for government monitoring they can keep tabs on a significant percentage of the population electronically, so they'll know just who to arrest when the next uprising comes.
 

recoil80

macrumors 68030
Jul 16, 2014
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The simple answer to that is that not everything can be moved online.

In the case of Apple, their executives frequently travel to China to ensure that the proper processes are adopted when manufacturing their products. This is not something which can be monitored online via a webcam.

Some things are still better done in person.
Apple works with hardware and secrecy is really important, I wouldn't take them as an example.
I mean some business travel does have sense, but not everything. A lot of people are working from home these days especially here, and work gets done. Do we all need to commute to the office every single day? I say no. Do we need to attend in person to every single meeting? Not at all
 

BigMcGuire

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Jan 10, 2012
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I wonder if the Coronavirus will push e-learning and video conference calls so it will be more common and perhaps change our sometimes old fashioned means to communicate. I heard the prime ministers of EU met via video link the other day - really good idea. Safe, quick, cheap and with minimal CO2 footprint. Quick, cheap and low CO2 footprint was apparently not sufficient arguments for using video calls. Does say a lot about the human nature.
I sure hope so. The cost and waste of in person meetings is horrific and I've had to travel the world for my job over the span of a few years. While the experience was great and there is definitely an ease of being able to talk in person with large groups, I still hate meetings.

The way we do WebEx conferences (Skype, and GoToMeetings) - I can see why some people think in person meetings are great. Call quality is usually horrid and it is VERY difficult to conduct meetings of 15+ people effectively. Sharing screens is needlessly complicated for non-technical folk.

Apple works with hardware and secrecy is really important, I wouldn't take them as an example.
I mean some business travel does have sense, but not everything. A lot of people are working from home these days especially here, and work gets done. Do we all need to commute to the office every single day? I say no. Do we need to attend in person to every single meeting? Not at all
Exactly. A lot of work that I know could be done at home. Instead, I have to drive 1 hour to the office, 1 hour back every day. A lot of upper management still holds to the idea that we need to have offices with people sitting in chairs with business furnished equipment. Meanwhile the freeways keep getting more and more packed and commutes keep getting longer... For some jobs this may be a necessity, but for a lot of the jobs I've seen, it's not a must.
 
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unchecked

macrumors regular
Sep 5, 2008
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I wonder if the Coronavirus will push e-learning and video conference calls so it will be more common and perhaps change our sometimes old fashioned means to communicate. I heard the prime ministers of EU met via video link the other day - really good idea. Safe, quick, cheap and with minimal CO2 footprint. Quick, cheap and low CO2 footprint was apparently not sufficient arguments for using video calls. Does say a lot about the human nature.
The thing we have to take account is people will inevitably slack off and lack discipline working from home.

If this thing sustains long enough through the year then solutions with that human behavioral flaw in mind would definitely be drawn up and but only to be used as a business continuity plan the next time something like this happens.
 

BigMcGuire

Contributor
Jan 10, 2012
5,451
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California
The thing we have to take account is people will inevitably slack off and lack discipline working from home.

If this thing sustains long enough through the year then solutions with that human behavioral flaw in mind would definitely be drawn up and but only to be used as a business continuity plan the next time something like this happens.
The other side of the coin is --- in an office you have a lot of wasted time as well right? Coffee, water cooler talk, the coworker that constantly comes in every day and asks you how your day is going, needless meetings, etc. I've heard managers say that out of an 8 hour day, only 4 hours of it is, at best, actual productivity.

But you're right. There are some people that cannot do working from home. I've seen it in our own company.
 

SeattleMoose

macrumors 68000
Jul 17, 2009
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When you are at work you are surrounded by fellow workers and management. This enforces a stricter work ethic than working at home where nobody can see if you are "working" or not. Remote control spying by management would certainly instill "work ethic" but that would take away from their own productivity. Most people simply lack the discipline to work at home.
School is a bit different because students must still achieve daily milestones, pass tests, and such. But classes such as shop (making things of wood, metal, etc.), art (painting, sculpting, etc.), band (playing realtime with others), choir (singing realtime with others), and physical education (sports) will simply vanish if everything goes online.
 

recoil80

macrumors 68030
Jul 16, 2014
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When you are at work you are surrounded by fellow workers and management. This enforces a stricter work ethic than working at home where nobody can see if you are "working" or not. Remote control spying by management would certainly instill "work ethic" but that would take away from their own productivity. Most people simply lack the discipline to work at home.
Remote work is not for everyone. Some people do prefer sitting in the same room with other colleagues, and I respect that. Other can't concentrate at home or are easily distracted.
I do believe in letting people chose, and of course you have to be evaluate by the quality of your work.
Companies are now forced to let people work remotely, let's see how it goes. Many of them will force their employees to get back to office as soon as we are able to contain the virus, other may find the experiment positive and offer at least some remote days to their people.
I like working remotely, and I hope many companies will adopt this as a standard. Unfortunately we're now facing an emergency, and I think companies need time to fully embrace remote work. My fear is that some companies will do remote the wrong way and for them the experiment will be considered a failure, so they won't consider it for the future.
 

DeepIn2U

macrumors 604
May 30, 2002
7,063
2,306
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
This doesnt suprise me. IT Businesses will profit from any kind of virus.
People wont come together like they used to and meetings will be held online.
today WTO declared this a pandemic now.

video conferencing has been around over 10yrs for corporations; from Polycom to Tandberg (purchased by Cisco in 2012) and Zoom etc.

corporations should have used VC in heavy use long before today, and I’m sure some executives and upper es chelín employees (VP’s,Regional managers, and Directors ) Will be upset of not being able to live the James Bond all expenses paid lifestyle travelling but it’s true way the world will be going.
 
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falainber

macrumors 68020
Mar 16, 2016
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truly a useful device fueled by great apps.
literally at the crossroads of humanity and technology.
Stop trolling. DingTalk is available for multiple platforms including Android. The app rating in Play Store (Android) is actually much higher than its rating in App Store (2.4 vs 1.6).
 

falainber

macrumors 68020
Mar 16, 2016
2,083
2,632
Wild West
In a thread discussing said device, said poster is not trolling. Stop hyperbolizing.
Saying that a particular device is "literally at the crossroads of humanity and technology" based on the fact that it can run DingTalk when every other device out there can do the same is definitely trolling regardless of the context.
 

BigMcGuire

Contributor
Jan 10, 2012
5,451
6,817
California
today WTO declared this a pandemic now.

video conferencing has been around over 10yrs for corporations; from Polycom to Tandberg (purchased by Cisco in 2012) and Zoom etc.

corporations should have used VC in heavy use long before today, and I’m sure some executives and upper es chelín employees (VP’s,Regional managers, and Directors ) Will be upset of not being able to live the James Bond all expenses paid lifestyle travelling but it’s true way the world will be going.
Zoom must be very happy. UCLA - where my wife goes - has gone all online for now - and they're going to use Zoom.

Yeah, a lot of people I work with love to travel and do all that stuff. I personally hate it. Doesn't help that airline seats are made for people 1/10th my size.

Bring on tele-commuting and remote work!!!!!!
- - Post merged: - -

Saying that a particular device is "literally at the crossroads of humanity and technology" based on the fact that it can run DingTalk when every other device out there can do the same is definitely trolling regardless of the context.
I don't think the OP was saying it was the ONLY device to do this? Otherwise, then maybe yeah, trolling. But I'm not seeing it here. To each our own I guess :p.
- - Post merged: - -

 
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I7guy

macrumors Core
Nov 30, 2013
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Saying that a particular device is "literally at the crossroads of humanity and technology" based on the fact that it can run DingTalk when every other device out there can do the same is definitely trolling regardless of the context.
Because you don’t like or agree someone’s post does not mean they are trolling.
 
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