iPad Wallpaper Resolution

Sketh

macrumors 6502
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Sep 14, 2007
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I apologize if this has been analyzed before, but In the 60 days of wait I have until I plop a sweet $499 (Plus Tax) I'd like to fill with making custom wallpaper for my theoretical device.

The wallpaper that they displayed it with? Lovely, it reminded me of a GHOSTS Wallpaper from Nine Inch Nails. So that got me thinking, what if I turn a lot of my favorite wallpapers into wall papers for the iPad?

Then I saw that the homescreen now supports both portrait and landscape orientations.

So, seeing as how the wallpaper rotates with the device, would the wallpaper have to be 1024 x 1024? because if it were 1024 x 768, there would be a large empty spot while in landscape mode.


Thoughts?

Also, once we get this ironed out, we can start posting our wallpapers here.

Again, I apologize if this has been discussed before. And if so, completely tune me out.
 

Sketh

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Sep 14, 2007
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I'm unsure that would be accurate?

Unless the iPad has some background shifting ability, like Android, but only in landscape mode? Which makes little sense.
 

Sketh

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Sep 14, 2007
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1024-by-768-pixel resolution at 132 pixels per inch (ppi)

(from the tech specs page on apple.com)

Haha, um... riiiight, we got that. But I was wondering about how big the wallpaper should be, as it also rotates with the display.
 

Julien

macrumors G4
Jun 30, 2007
11,137
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Haha, um... riiiight, we got that. But I was wondering about how big the wallpaper should be, as it also rotates with the display.
Even though it seems strange I'm betting (and downloading) that Interfacelift has it right.
 

Sketh

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Sep 14, 2007
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Me as well, they've never steered me wrong before.

Unless you count that time their site got hacked... I'll.. I'll never forgive them.
 

Sketh

macrumors 6502
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Sep 14, 2007
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I just wanted to point out that Interfacelift did INDEED lead me astray.

And I was right, the resolution IS 1024 x 1024.
 

Julien

macrumors G4
Jun 30, 2007
11,137
3,826
Atlanta
I just wanted to point out that Interfacelift did INDEED lead me astray.

And I was right, the resolution IS 1024 x 1024.
Yea, but at least it was only about 4 or 5 wallpapers down the tubes. If they had of keep going until the actual iPad release before correcting then it would have become a major, minor problem (since it's free).:eek: Now I'm back up (or down) to 2 iPad wallpapers.:D
 

pvmacguy

macrumors 65816
Sep 2, 2009
1,112
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Jax
They have some pretty good looking wallpapers on that site. They will look good on the iPad's screen.
 

PixelOz

macrumors newbie
Apr 23, 2009
27
0
Vega Alta, Puerto Rico, USA
Ipad resolution IS 1024 x 768

Here is a post that is a more like a small tutorial:

Ipad Resolution is 1024 x 768 at 132 Dpi as listed in Apple web site.

And the aspect ratio of the screen is not 1:1, it is 4:3 as in old CRT monitors. A 1:1 aspect ratio is a perfect square and if you look at the Ipad you can tell at a glance that its monitor is not a perfect square clearly.

If those people from Interfacelift list those wallpapers as 1024 x 1024 (1:1 aspect ratio) is because of the automatic rotation of the Ipad and that must be to compensate for the aspect ratio rotation by changing from the vertical position of the Ipad which is portrait orientation but if you flip it 90 degrees then it is in landscape orientation.

The wallpaper that was shown in Apple's presentation was designed in portrait mode, I think that you can design a wallpaper for the Ipad that is 1024 x 768 but vertical for portrait but it won't look as good in landscape and the opposite which is that you could design a wallpaper for the Ipad at 1024 x 768 resolution with landscape orientation an it would look good in landscape mode but it may not look so good in portrait mode when the device is rotated.

I haven't have access to an Ipad yet to know what the computer does with those wallpapers when it rotates, maybe it letterboxes them, maybe it stretches them this or that other way or maybe it does other things to them.

Different things can be done to this depending on how the device was programed by Apple, many different things and the device may have different ways to handle that if it has different settings that the user selects, it depends again on how it was programmed.

My guess is that Interfacelift is asking for 1024 x 1024 because they found that it can be a good compromise for the orientation change problem but again that could make the image stretch or shrink in one way or another or letterbox in one way or another depending on how Apple programed the machine but it will still be a compromise too, that's their solution but you may do the wallpapers in one of those 3 ways, 1024 x 768 portrait, 1024 x 768 landscape and perhaps Interfacelift compromise of 1024 x 1024 for both orientations, that's up to you but the device true resolution is still 1024 x 768 with a 4:3 aspect ratio.

You are not the only people to get confused by this, when I visited different forums and saw people talking about wallpaper I saw a lot of confusion about total resolution versus Dpi resolution and vs aspect ratio.

Dpi resolution is determined by the total amount of resolution of the display (in this case 1024 x 768) and the real physical size measure of the display in inches or any other measuring system but if you use a different measuring system to determine Dpi you will have to convert the physical measures of the display to inches first because it is Dpi which is Dots per inch.

This means that if you have an equal resolution and you have different sizes of monitors the Dpi will be different in those dissimilar sizes monitors. If you have a small screen let's say 7 inches diagonally with that resolution and you have a 12 inch display with that same resolution the small display will have a higher Dpi than the large display.

The aspect ratio is also something that confuses people a lot, it just means that if you have a 4:3 aspect ratio (old squarish monitors do) you have to take those 1024 pixels and divided them by 4 and then multiply them by 3 and you will get 768 pixels, that's why you cannot use something like a 16:9 resolution of HD in a 4:3 monitor because if you use a wallpaper with those pixel resolutions it will stretch enormously and it will look bad.

If you have a 16:9 aspect ratio (the new HD widescreen monitors) you have to take that resolution (1920 for example), divide it by 16 and multiply it by 9 and you will get 1080 pixels and is the same for other resolutions with those 4:3 or 16:9 aspect ratios and for other aspect ratios like 16:10 (Apple regular widescreen displays for example) you calculate it in the same way.

The general idea is to maintain the pixel as a square pixel and that's why the pixel proportions of those different resolutions is different in the different aspect ratios of different monitors because if you don't follow those pixel proportions your images will be distorted either vertically or horizontally.

Here is a little table to use as a reference that contain most mayor resolutions used today:

16:10 Aspect Ratio

3840 x 2400
2560 x 1600
1920 x 1200
1680 x 1050
1440 x 900
1280 x 800

Near 16:10 Aspect Ratio (Pixel is not perfectly square but close)

1280 x 768

16:9 Aspect Ratio

1920 x 1080
1600 x 900
1366 x 768
1280 x 720

4:3 Aspect Ratio

2048 x 1536
1600 x 1200
1280 x 960
1152 x 864
1024 x 768

Near 4:3 Aspect Ratio (Pixel is not perfectly square but close)

1280 x 1024

Iphone 4:3 aspect ratio

320 horizontal x 480 vertical. The wallpaper is always vertical in the Iphone cause it doesn't rotate in landscape mode (photos do rotate and they are letterboxed)

Ipad 4:3 aspect ratio

1024 horizontal x 768 vertical in landscape mode
768 horizontal x 1024 vertical in portrait mode

I hope that that helps to clear a bit of this confusion. :)
 

EssentialParado

macrumors 65816
Feb 17, 2005
1,154
6
Dpi resolution is determined by the total amount of resolution of the display (in this case 1024 x 768) and the real physical size measure of the display in inches or any other measuring system but if you use a different measuring system to determine Dpi you will have to convert the physical measures of the display to inches first because it is Dpi which is Dots per inch.

This means that if you have an equal resolution and you have different sizes of monitors the Dpi will be different in those dissimilar sizes monitors. If you have a small screen let's say 7 inches diagonally with that resolution and you have a 12 inch display with that same resolution the small display will have a higher Dpi than the large display.
This is very confusing. I think it's important to point out that DPI is only used in printing.

Apple refer to number of pixels in their screen as certain DPI numbers, but DPI is not relevant to the background wallpapers you want to use — They could be 1 DPI, they could be 100000 DPI, it won't make a difference — The only measurement that matters is 1024 x 1024.

(Of course, if you're planning to print the image out it starts to make a difference, but in the context of iPad wallpapers it is useless to know about.)
 

Hammie

macrumors 65816
Mar 17, 2009
1,446
1
Wash, DC Metro
This is very confusing. I think it's important to point out that DPI is only used in printing.

Apple refer to number of pixels in their screen as certain DPI numbers, but DPI is not relevant to the background wallpapers you want to use — They could be 1 DPI, they could be 100000 DPI, it won't make a difference — The only measurement that matters is 1024 x 1024.

(Of course, if you're planning to print the image out it starts to make a difference, but in the context of iPad wallpapers it is useless to know about.)
Finally, a wise person.

I have been in many debates about this with various people over the years. There have a been a few online photo contest site where they require you to submit a photo at a certain DPI but they have no intention of printing it. :confused:

Certainly mind boggling for some. But thanks for the clarification. :D
 

PixelOz

macrumors newbie
Apr 23, 2009
27
0
Vega Alta, Puerto Rico, USA
Your information is not correct

I don't know where do you get your information but what you said about Dpi is WRONG.

Dpi IS NOT a term related only to printing at all. It just means as it names states DOTS PER INCH and is just a measuring method of dot density per inch vertically and horizontally. It is also called Ppi (Points per inch) which is synonymous.

It IS NOT limited in use to the subject of printing be that desktop printing or the printing press. I'm a professional graphic artist with more than 25 years of experience in the field and I have done desktop publishing for many, many of those years and I'm also a web developer with several years of working in a the field and I absolutely know that the term is not related to printing only.

The fact that you often hear the term around the subject of printing doesn't mean by any measure that it is related only to printing and I don't know where you have been in the last three decades but I have been learning computers in them and my first PC was a TRS-80 PC a long time ago and I've been reading computer magazines, computers manuals, computer books and the Internet all those years and so you know my favorite area of study in computers is graphics, of all kinds and I know I've seen the term Dpi used in countless, countless occasions related to computer displays.

A computer display does have a Dpi measure but it is not used that frequently because it's variable an in printing if you have a printer that has for example a maximum of 600 Dpi resolution it will always print at that resolution if it is set like that at the printer driver. Printer resolution can be used at a lower Dpi by setting it as such through the printer driver but they are many times used at their maximum resolution but not always. With a CRT your Dpi will vary according to total resolution (such as 1600 x 1200).

Today LCD displays are usually used at a fixed resolution (usually the maximum) because at other resolutions their quality degrades much more than with CRT monitors but at their maximum resolution they are way sharper and crisper than most any CRT if their quality is not abysmal so their Dpi resolution is mostly fixed at the maximum.

Old CRT monitors can look pretty good at their different resolutions but overall they do not look as sharp as LCDs at the maximum or optimal resolution as it is also called. Despite this, LCD resolution can vary just like in CRT by changing the resolution settings of you graphic card and when you do that you effectively change the Dpi resolution of the display so in a computer monitor the display can have a variable Dpi resolution.

Computer displays do have a Dpi resolution, what happens is that at the moment that is usually much lower than in printers and in the printing press it is way higher because they use imagesetters instead of regular desktop printers and those print at way higher Dpi resolution than regular desktop printers. Imagesetters can print usually between 1200 Dpi and 4800 Dpi.

Computer displays have usually been between 72 Dpi and 96 Dpi but at the moment that is starting to change because of the new HD monitors that people are starting to use and becoming higher and the IPad is such an example with 132 Dpi resolution and that is due to its relatively small display size (when compared to desktop monitors) vs its total resolution of 1024 x 768 pixels.

If Dpi or Ppi is not used when talking about computer displays then why Apple has the Ipad listed as a device with 132 Ppi in their web site in the tech specifications of the device? Your information about Dpi is not completely correct. One immediate use of Dpi information is comparing the quality and readability of computer displays with a printed page which at the moment is way higher but it has other uses.

Yes, Dpi information in something like a wallpaper is relatively irrelevant because in wallpapers what matters the most is the total resolution and yes it doesn't matter what Dpi they have because you could set the Dpi information differently at the moment of saving the file when you change your page size or when you change the Dpi information of the file. When displaying such an image as wallpaper you will see it exactly the same because only the total resolution of the image will matter at the desktop but the file does contain the Dpi information as you saved it and an image editor and other programs can read and interpret that information and this does have some uses but it would take me too long to explain it here but believe me it does.

Now, with different monitors in desktop computers Dpi will vary but in the IPad it won't because the display is set at a fixed resolution and by it being at a fixed resolution and a fixed physical size its Dpi resolution will always be 132 Dpi. Those older applications for the IPhone can be shown with a small screen or at double size but the IPad display has a consistent 132 Dpi resolution. When Apple lists the Dpi information of the IPad it doesn't do it for wallpapers, it does it for physical comparison to the resolution of other devices or the resolution of other things.

Like I said before, the subject of total resolution vs Dpi resolution vs the physical size of the display or page is a subject where there is still a lot of confusion, but there is a lot of information about it in different places on the Internet, it just takes a little while to understand and use all those terms correctly.
 

PixelOz

macrumors newbie
Apr 23, 2009
27
0
Vega Alta, Puerto Rico, USA
Your information is not correct

The reason that they asked for a certain Dpi resolution for the online photo contest is because you can always zoom in in a higher resolution picture and see the details better, if the contest didn't allow the participants or viewing public to see the full size image it is less relevant but if the judging panel (if it's not the public themselves) can view the file that you submitted in their computer at full resolution they can see the details better if they want to by zooming in or by printing the photo.

The place where the contest was held may show only smaller images for displaying them when you first see them but in some places you may click on some pictures as you may have seen before and be able to see a larger picture with all the information that your picture has so this will depend on where the contest was held and how they set that up.
 

Julien

macrumors G4
Jun 30, 2007
11,137
3,826
Atlanta
Doesn't the iPad auto crop wallpaper as you rotate while keeping aspect ratio constant? If so then 1024x1024 makes perfect sense and becomes 1024x768 or 768x1024 by simply chopping the wallpaper 128 pixels top and 128 pixels bottom or 128 pixels left and 128 pixels right to. If it doesn't than there is no way to preserve aspect ratio without black bars or incorrect geometry. If this is the case Apple should stick with the wallpaper fixed (not rotate).

EDIT: just went to Apple and watched the video and looked through the gallery and they don't show it go from portrait to landscape on the home screen. Does anyone have a pic of the same home screen in both so i can tell if it auto crops?
 

darngooddesign

macrumors G3
Jul 4, 2007
9,310
210
Atlanta, GA
Unless the icons rotate as well I see no reason why the wallpaper should. There will be a disconnect with the icons and wallpaper having separate orientations.
 

Julien

macrumors G4
Jun 30, 2007
11,137
3,826
Atlanta
Unless the icons rotate as well I see no reason why the wallpaper should. There will be a disconnect with the icons and wallpaper having separate orientations.
Agreed and I'm assuming they do rotate. If not the the Home Screen is portrait only and Steve is incorrect by saying there is no wrong way to hold it:D (at least for the Home screen).

Also if this is correct (Home doesn't rotate) then all wallpaper should be 1024x768.