iPhone 12 Lineup Features HDR Video Recording With Dolby Vision for Vivid Colors

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One of the key new camera-related features of the iPhone 12 lineup is support for Dolby Vision, a professional HDR video format that provides more accurate, lifelike color along with brighter highlights and darker shadows.

Shot on iPhone 12 Pro in Dolby Vision by Academy Award winning cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki

Apple says iPhone 12 models are the world's first devices capable of real-time Dolby Vision video recording — up to 4K at 30 FPS on iPhone 12 models and up to 4K at 60 FPS on Pro models. To achieve this, the devices have a new image signal processor that can take two exposures, create a histogram, and generate Dolby Vision metadata based on that histogram.

Apple demonstrated Dolby Vision on the iPhone 12 Pro during its event this week with a video shot by Academy Award winning cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki, and it has since shared behind-the-scenes footage of the video on YouTube.


Dolby Vision support is end-to-end across the iPhone 12 lineup, meaning that users can capture, edit, and play back video in Dolby Vision directly on the devices. Dolby Vision grading is processed live and sustained during editing, which can be done in the Photos, iMovie, or Clips apps on the iPhone, or in Final Cut Pro on the Mac starting later this year.

Article Link: iPhone 12 Lineup Features HDR Video Recording With Dolby Vision for Vivid Colors
 
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elie195

macrumors newbie
Sep 16, 2009
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Up until yesterday I always thought Dolby Vision = 12-bit. I guess 10-bit + metadata now counts as well.
 

samtfischer

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Oct 14, 2020
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It should be noted that Dolby Vision is not an acquisition format, only a delivery format. So whenever you see "recording/capturing in Dolby Vision", it's a little misleading. Dolby Vision is only used to take HDR content and tone map it down to other displays. So basically, whenever a user would share the video.
 

aaronhead14

macrumors 65816
Mar 9, 2009
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Up until yesterday I always thought Dolby Vision = 12-bit. I guess 10-bit + metadata now counts as well.
Dolby Vision can support 12-bit, but it doesn’t have to. Minimum requirements are 10-bit.

It should be noted that Dolby Vision is not an acquisition format, only a delivery format. So whenever you see "recording/capturing in HDR", it's a little misleading. Dolby Vision is only used to take HDR content and tone map it down to other displays. So basically, whenever a user would share the video.

I came here to say just this! It makes NO sense to “record” in Dolby Vision! The entire point of Dolby Vision is to create interpolated HDR-to-SDR trims AFTER the film has been color graded and finished. This is just a strange marketing ploy from Apple, and it encourages people to not go through a proper post workflow. It’s a very bizarre “feature.”
 

mozumder

macrumors 6502a
Mar 9, 2009
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As nice at it is, it still has the "watercolor" look of a camera-phone, due to all the AI hacks they have to do to get higher dynamic range from a cell-phone camera. That's not going to go away until they quadruple the lens/pixel size. Each pixel is only about 10 bits of dynamic range in its electron well, instead of the 15+ bits you'd get in a real camera.

I wish Apple would just make an interchangeable lens camera, with their amazing CPU/ISP, to allow for a camera with apps you can download from the App Store.
 

samtfischer

macrumors newbie
Oct 14, 2020
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Dolby Vision can support 12-bit, but it doesn’t have to. Minimum requirements are 10-bit.



I came here to say just this! It makes NO sense to “record” in Dolby Vision! The entire point of Dolby Vision is to create interpolated HDR-to-SDR trims AFTER the film has been color graded and finished. This is just a strange marketing ploy from Apple, and it encourages people to not go through a proper post workflow. It’s a very bizarre “feature.”
It just allows them to capture HDR content, but then use some Dolby algorithms to do some tone mapping so that when you invoke the share sheet to send that HDR video somewhere, it won't look like garbage when viewed on anything less than a Super Retina XDR display (even a lesser TV if you're AirPlaying the content).
 

samtfischer

macrumors newbie
Oct 14, 2020
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It just allows them to capture HDR content, but then use some Dolby algorithms to do some tone mapping so that when you invoke the share sheet to send that HDR video somewhere, it won't look like garbage when viewed on anything less than a Super Retina XDR display (even a lesser HDTV if you're AirPlaying the content).
Also Dolby Vision allows for frame-by-frame tone mapping metadata, which the other flavors of HDR don't allow. Certainly would be better suited for any iPhone video captured than another format with static metadata.
 
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fbr$

macrumors 6502
Feb 6, 2020
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Curious to know what's the bitrate of the Apple ProRAW format compared to HEVC (H.265).

Just for comparison, on the Camera settings it says a HEVC 4K 60fps recording takes about 400 MB/min (= 3200 Mb/min = 53.3 Mb/s).
 

MauiPa

macrumors 65816
Apr 18, 2018
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It should be noted that Dolby Vision is not an acquisition format, only a delivery format. So whenever you see "recording/capturing in Dolby Vision", it's a little misleading. Dolby Vision is only used to take HDR content and tone map it down to other displays. So basically, whenever a user would share the video.
if it didn't have that, wouldn't it have to be post-procossed to dolby Vision? If so, not misleading at all
 

samtfischer

macrumors newbie
Oct 14, 2020
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if it didn't have that, wouldn't it have to be post-procossed to dolby Vision? If so, not misleading at all
I'm confused by your wording. They don't necessarily have to use Dolby Vision to map the HDR content to other displays, but it's certainly flashier.
 
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