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Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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The iPhone 13 lineup depreciates in value at almost half the rate of the Google Pixel 6, according to research by SellCell.

google-pixel-6-phone-2.jpg

The Pixel 6, Google's latest flagship smartphone, launched just two months after Apple's iPhone 13 lineup. Despite being touted as a leading Android competitor to the iPhone, the Pixel 6 suffers from considerably worse depreciation.

In the first month after launch, all of the iPhone 13 models depreciated by 24.9 percent on average. The Pixel 6 models, on the other hand, lost 42.6 percent of their value on average. Since then, the iPhone 13 has regained some of its value, with a recovery of 3.1 percent of its value since the first month. Overall, the iPhone 13 models are holding their value significantly better, leading to minimized losses for customers looking to sell their new device.

sellcell-iphone-13-depreciation-chart-percentage.jpg

Looking at the most low-cost options in the respective lineups, the 128GB Pixel 6 lost the least value of all of the Google models with depreciation of 36.6 percent. This compares to depreciation of 26.9 percent for the 128GB iPhone 13 mini, which is among the least popular iPhone models.

sellcell-pixel-6-depreciation-table-percentage.jpg

Last month, it was reported that the iPhone 13 models were holding their value much better than any previous iPhone in the period after launch. Going into December, the iPhone 13 has shown continued buoyancy with the lowest depreciation rate in the entire smartphone industry. That being said, the Pixel 6 is still early in its release and the coming months will present a clearer picture of the depreciation contrast between it and the iPhone 13.

SellCell's research is based on data from 45 buyback vendors. See the full report for more detailed information.

Article Link: iPhone 13 Depreciates Half as Much as Flagship Android Rival
 

velocityg4

macrumors 604
Dec 19, 2004
7,329
4,718
Georgia
That's actually one of the things which attracted me to my first Pixel. The Pixel XL. I got the same performance as other used high end androids of the same generation for less money. As the Galaxy seems to hold value a bit better. Still nothing close to an iPhone.
 

4jasontv

Suspended
Jul 31, 2011
6,272
7,548
In the first month after launch, all of the iPhone 13 models depreciated by 24.9 percent on average.
This doesn’t seem to align with the chart. It looks like they depreciated somewhere between 27.5 and 34.9%.
 

szw-mapple fan

macrumors 68040
Jul 28, 2012
3,503
4,369
This doesn’t seem to align with the chart. It looks like they depreciated somewhere between 27.5 and 34.9%.
The chart is indicating that the depreciation in the first month is more severe in the first month compared to later months, meaning that for example a used iPhone 13 Pro would be worth more 3 months in than 1 month in, actually appreciating in value from 27% depreciation to 23%. This is either because of the availability of new models at launch, the lack of new stock 3 months in, or simply an incorrect chart/data.
 

neuropsychguy

macrumors 68020
Sep 29, 2008
2,435
5,846
Enough BRAGGING that your expensive phone because it's Apple is depreciating less than any other phone...this is not the kind of article I expect from Macrumors!
This is important information. Historically, Apple electronic devices have held value better than those by other manufacturers. Over the years I've priced out cost-to-own for various computers -- Dell, Apple, etc. When I factored in resale values and other costs for administering the devices, Apple products were usually the same cost over time or less expensive over time to own. I could buy an Apple laptop, for example, use it for 2-3 years, sell it, and buy a new Apple laptop and come out ahead than if I bought a Dell, HP, Lenovo, etc., used it for 2-3 years, and then resold it.

Further, if you do not resell, Macs tend to be usable for a long time. Windows-based computers can too but I tend to migrate my older Windows-based computers to Linux rather than continue to use Windows but can keep my Macs running macOS (although I have moved one to Mint). At work I'm still using 8 year old iMacs but computers running Windows have been replaced because they were not keeping up with demands. This is anecdote but it generally matches other experiences: 3 - 5 years for Windows-based PCs and 5 - 7 years for Macs.

Take this with a huge grain of salt because it's based on a study commissioned by Apple but estimated business costs are lower with Macs than Windows-based computers (I post it because it links to independent data from IBM showing it costs them less to run Macs than Windows-based computers): https://www.computerworld.com/article/3626697/apple-macs-are-best-choice-for-enterprise.html

That Apple phones follow this pattern suggests that while iPhones might have a higher up-front cost than competing devices, they might be less expensive to own over 2-3 years. They also tend to last longer (meaning security updates, performance, etc.) than many competing phones running Android.

It's not bragging, it's business and economics.
 
Last edited:

FightTheFuture

macrumors 68000
Oct 19, 2003
1,878
3,031
that town east of ann arbor
This is important information. Historically, Apple electronic devices have held value better than those by other manufacturers. Over the years I've priced out cost-to-own for various computers -- Dell, Apple, etc. When I factored in resale values and other costs for administering the devices, Apple products were usually the same cost over time or less expensive over time to own. I could buy an Apple laptop, for example, use it for 2-3 years, sell it, and buy a new Apple laptop and come out ahead than if I bought a Dell, HP, Lenovo, etc., used it for 2-3 years, and then resold it.

That Apple phones follow this pattern suggests that while iPhones might have a higher up-front cost than competing devices, they might be less expensive to own over 2-3 years. They also tend to last longer (meaning security updates, performance, etc.) than many competing phones running Android.

It's not bragging, it's business and economics.
Throw the original HomePod resale value into the mix and it’ll really mess up the pattern.
 
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