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Apple's next-generation iPhone 13 lineup will use Qualcomm's Snapdragon X60 5G modem, with Samsung to handle manufacturing of the chip, according to DigiTimes.

qualcomm-snapdragon-x60-5g.jpg

Built on a 5nm process, the X60 packs higher power efficiency into a smaller footprint compared to the 7nm-based Snapdragon X55 modem used in iPhone 12 models, which could contribute to longer battery life. With the X60 modem, iPhone 13 models would also be able to aggregate 5G data from both mmWave and sub-6GHz bands simultaneously to achieve an optimal combination of high-speed and low-latency network coverage.

mmWave is a set of 5G frequencies that promise ultra-fast speeds at short distances, making it best suited for dense urban areas. By comparison, sub-6GHz 5G is generally slower than mmWave, but the signals travel further, better serving suburban and rural areas. mmWave support on iPhone 12 models is limited to the United States, but rumors suggest that iPhone 13 models may support mmWave in additional countries.

In 2019, Apple and Qualcomm settled a legal battle and reached a multiyear chipset supply agreement, paving the way for Apple to use Qualcomm's 5G modems. A court document from the settlement revealed that Apple would likely use the X60 modem for 2021 iPhones, followed by the recently announced Snapdragon X65 modem in 2022 iPhones.

The X65 is the world's first 10 Gigabit 5G modem and antenna system for smartphones, enabling theoretical data speeds up to 10 gigabits per second. While real-world download speeds will certainly be slower than that, the X65 has many other benefits, including improved power efficiency, enhanced coverage for both mmWave and sub-6 GHz bands, and support for all global commercialized mmWave frequencies.

Starting in 2023, Apple is expected to start using its own in-house 5G modems for iPhones.

Article Link: iPhone 13 Lineup Expected to Use Qualcomm's Snapdragon X60 Modem With Several 5G Improvements
 
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DoctorTech

macrumors 6502a
Jan 6, 2014
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Indianapolis, IN
I don't know if it is the modem in my iPhone 12 Pro Max or the cell towers in the Indianapolis area but so far I am underwhelmed by 5G performance. I have run Internet speed tests when I am connected to 5G with 4 bars showing for my signal strength and I am getting speeds about 1/2 the speed of what I normally get with 4G. It was back in December when I ran those tests in several locations around the South side of Indy so hopefully the speed has improved since then.
 
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DelayedGratificationGene

macrumors regular
Jan 11, 2020
244
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So Foxconn partnering with Fisker to produce EVs... why would Apple not use Foxconn to produce its Apple Car? Looks as though Foxconn is ready and able. Am I missing something with this?
 
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herocero

macrumors regular
Jan 23, 2003
127
34
down on the upside
Not sure what I’d need to download at 5Gbps to my cell, let alone 10Gbps. Rural area with cell coverage as your home hotspot I’d imagine a great use-case, but given how quickly you’d hit that data cap ... Starlink can’t spin up fast enough.
 
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alj96z

macrumors newbie
Oct 19, 2018
5
30
I don't know if it is the modem in my iPhone 12 Pro Max or the cell towers in the Indianapolis area but so far I am underwhelmed by 5G performance. I have run Internet speed tests when I am connected to 5G with 4 bars showing for my signal strength and I am getting speeds about 1/2 the speed of what I normally get with 4G. It was back in December when I ran those tests in several locations around the South side of Indy so hopefully the speed has improved since then.
It’s not the modem, it’s your carrier. It sounds like you probably have Verizon. Their only true 5G is their UWB network which is very sparse, their nationwide 5G is just sharing spectrum with their LTE network. AT&T is pretty much the same story. The only carrier that’s serious about widespread, dedicated 5G, is t-mobile. As LTE gets phased out at AT&T and Verizon in the coming years, expect those frequencies to be freed up for dedicated 5G and speeds to improve.
 
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mashdots

macrumors regular
Dec 10, 2015
156
451
seattle-ish
Will phone calls still sound like you're in the 1950s?
honestly that's an interesting point. i don't know much about the tech behind the phone calls themselves but i find it funny that audio quality hasn't gotten better by much (if at all).

on the other hand, i do from time to time stick with facetime audio since it has significantly better quality.
 
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LeadingHeat

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Oct 3, 2015
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I’m just wondering how Samesung being contracted to make the chips won’t allow them to copy down the blueprints as they cross their desk. I know there would be huge lawsuits but wouldn’t seeing how it’s made help them develop their own? Give them a head start on developing something different enough to get away with it?
 
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rjohnstone

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Dec 28, 2007
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PHX, AZ.
I’m just wondering how Samesung being contracted to make the chips won’t allow them to copy down the blueprints as they cross their desk. I know there would be huge lawsuits but wouldn’t seeing how it’s made help them develop their own? Give them a head start on developing something different enough to get away with it?
It would be illegal and QComm can sue the heck out of them. NDA's prevent manufacturing from sending info to other departments at Samsung.
Samsung's modem design unit would never see them at any point in manufacturing.
 
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jntdroid

macrumors 6502
Oct 12, 2011
411
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honestly that's an interesting point. i don't know much about the tech behind the phone calls themselves but i find it funny that audio quality hasn't gotten better by much (if at all).

on the other hand, i do from time to time stick with facetime audio since it has significantly better quality.

Y'all must not have HD Voice on your carrier then? It's like going from AM to FM/HD radio.
 
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mnsportsgeek

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Feb 24, 2009
2,876
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I'm in the minority of people who appreciate a smaller phone but I didn't get the iPhone 12 mini due to its battery life. With this new 5G modem I'm hoping the iPhone 13 mini will have an improved battery life. That would make it a certain buy for me.
Probably similar battery life as the 12 mini after the always on display and 120hz battery hit.
 
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dmylrea

macrumors 68040
Sep 27, 2005
3,334
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I don't know if it is the modem in my iPhone 12 Pro Max or the cell towers in the Indianapolis area but so far I am underwhelmed by 5G performance. I have run Internet speed tests when I am connected to 5G with 4 bars showing for my signal strength and I am getting speeds about 1/2 the speed of what I normally get with 4G. It was back in December when I ran those tests in several locations around the South side of Indy so hopefully the speed has improved since then.
Apart from the glee of seeing Speedtest show you a real big number, what practical purpose would you have for such fast speeds? As many believe, I see 5G as a marketing gimmick. If I dream for a minute and the country is covered in super-fast 5G, what would I do faster on my iPhone than I currently do on 4G where it makes a difference?
 
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