iPhone 3G Environmental Requirements

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by kingshrubb, Jul 10, 2008.

  1. kingshrubb macrumors regular

    kingshrubb

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    #1
    Hey, this is sort of an odd thread... I'm just wondering what will happen if I take my iPhone above 10,000 feet, or take it below 32°F. Will it just momentarily stop working or might I actually cause harm to the hardware / device?

    I ask this cause I'm going mountain climbing in Montana in a week and don't want to destroy my new device lol, thx. :)
     
  2. ramblintoad macrumors member

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    #2
    I doubt it would do harm. They just put those in to cover their ass. There is no way they could prove the damage was from the environment (except water of course). It would just look like a hardware defect.
     
  3. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

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    #3

    It will freeze.

    You'll then be forced to do one of two things

    1) say that it just stopped working
    2) get a new one

    You'd be a dishonest person if you went with 1, and you'd be an idiot to do 2 after you knew you shouldn't have brought it.
     
  4. hierobryan macrumors 6502a

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    #4
    no he wouldn't. we all lie every once in a while.
     
  5. kingshrubb thread starter macrumors regular

    kingshrubb

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    #5
    I guess I'll just keep it in a pocket close to my body for warmth cuz there's no way I'm leaving it in a hotel or car. :(
     
  6. Sherb macrumors member

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    #6
    I live at 8,000 feet year round and in the winter it gets far below 32˚F. I never had a problem with my iPhone and every once in a while I would leave it in the car over night (by accident). It took a little bit to warm up, but after that it was fine. No problems.
     
  7. markym07931 macrumors regular

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    #7
    note to self... don't use iphone in vegas.... too hot
     
  8. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

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    #8
    Because everyone lies once in a while he wouldn't be dishonest? Get a clue. If you said that the iPhone just stopped working on its own when you knowingly exceeded the operating specs, you are lying and it is completely dishonest.

    With that being said, they'd probably give you a new one anyway, but don't try to pretend that would be honest...
     
  9. JD92 macrumors 6502a

    JD92

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    #9
    I'd imagine going hotter than you should would be more likely to cause problems than going colder.
     
  10. txr0ckabilly macrumors 6502

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    #10
    i live in louisiana where it's 100+ deg with a heat index of 110+, humidity at 90-100% for two months- never had a phone quit working because of it.
     
  11. kingshrubb thread starter macrumors regular

    kingshrubb

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    #11
    Besides the hot and cold though, would altitude be a problem or not so much?

    Thx for your help btw :)
     
  12. theotherrogue macrumors regular

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    #12
    Is there a minimum operating altitude?

    just kidding
     
  13. gazzer82 macrumors regular

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    Jul 8, 2008
    #13
    I work with digital projectors a lot, nearly all of them have an altitude setting which can be set to low or high. Never really considered why, i guess it has something to do with air density/airflow for cooling, but thats a complete guess!!
     
  14. Mr. Giver '94 macrumors 68000

    Mr. Giver '94

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    #14
    I assume it would stop working if you took it into space. LOL! I doubt there is a maximum altitude because you can use it on a plane. (which i will be doing on Monday) I'm guessing I'll see some at LAX and maybe on the plane.
     
  15. grapes911 Moderator emeritus

    grapes911

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    #15
    Aren't planes pressurized though.
     
  16. kingshrubb thread starter macrumors regular

    kingshrubb

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    #16
    Ya but an airplane's cabin pressure is controlled by machines to make it similar to the elevation of the ground. If it wasn't anyone who went on a plane would die from the extreme altitude :eek:
     
  17. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

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    #17
    Yes, yes they are.
     
  18. Mr. Giver '94 macrumors 68000

    Mr. Giver '94

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    #18
    True, but it is still pressurized to a rather high altitude. I looked it up on Wikipedia:

    "These systems maintain air pressure equivalent to 2,500 m (8,000 ft) or below, even during flight at altitudes above 13,000 m (43,000 ft)."
     
  19. grapes911 Moderator emeritus

    grapes911

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    #19
    Well, 8,000 ft is still less than the max operating altitude of 10,000 ft.
     
  20. Mr. Giver '94 macrumors 68000

    Mr. Giver '94

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    #20
    I also looked at all of the mountains in Montana and the tallest one is Granite Peak at 12, 799 ft.

    "Granite Peak is one of the most difficult U.S. state highpoint ascents, due to technical climbing, poor weather, and route finding. Granite Peak’s first ascent was made by Elers Koch on August 29, 1923 after several failed attempts by others. It was the last of the state highpoints to be climbed. Today, climbers typically spend two or three days ascending the peak, stopping over on the Froze-to-Death Plateau."

    So I doubt that's where you'll be climbing, and most of the other mountains that I saw were between 8000-10000 feet.
    Don't know if that helps, and since the iPhone isn't completely sealed from air, it won't be affected by any compression/decompression issues. Although I don't know if all the parts (mostly battery) would be okay.
     
  21. gazzer82 macrumors regular

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    #21
    Hmm, wonder if google maps work up there, though if it's a 2 day hike you should probably turn the 3G off, would never last!! :)
     
  22. kingshrubb thread starter macrumors regular

    kingshrubb

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    #22
    LOL I just looked up the mountain I'm climbing:

    Mount Merritt (10,004 ft / 3,049 m) is located in the Lewis Range in the U.S. state of Montana.[2] The peak is one of six in Glacier National Park over 10,000 ft (3,048 m). Located in the northeastern part of the park, Mount Merritt rises dramatically a vertical mile above nearby rivers. The approach to this remote peak involves a one way hike of 13 miles (21 km) to the summit base.

    Right on the boarder line of 10,000! :D
     
  23. Mr. Giver '94 macrumors 68000

    Mr. Giver '94

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    #23
    If the Apple page says max is 10000 feet, it is actually a bit more. They just want to be sure that they aren't liable for any damages related to altitude. All of their max conditions air on the side of caution.
     
  24. Oskee2001 macrumors regular

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    #24
    you might want to leave it in your hotel room safe just to be on the safe side. take a cheapie with you for emergencies.....
     
  25. hierobryan macrumors 6502a

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    #25
    Sure his action would be dishonest, but it doesn't mean he's an absolutely dishonest person. Fact is everyone lies...you know it and I know it.
     

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