iPhone 4, after unlock, then upgrade, will still be unlocked?!

Discussion in 'Jailbreaks and iOS Hacks' started by lily69, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. lily69 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2010
    #1
    I am reading this link:
    http://www.gadgetsdna.com/iphone-4-jailbreak-and-unlock-in-single-tool/4987/

    It says: a successful bruteforce of your unique unlock code would give you your permanent unlock, no ultrasn0w needed

    Since I am only interested in unlock not jailbreak, does this mean the new unlock tool will make my iPhone 4 unlocked just like factory unlock, and I can upgrade to official software, become none-jailbroken but still remain unlocked?
     
  2. benflick macrumors 68020

    benflick

    Joined:
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    #2
    No, this means that Ultrasn0w will work like it always has--a soft unlock. The Dev Team can only produce a soft unlock. A bruteforce unlock is what Apple uses in countries like Austrailia and France which require phones to be unlocked. A bruteforce unlocked iPhone will remain unlocked forever, an Ultrasn0w unlock will not.
     
  3. jmann macrumors 604

    jmann

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    #3
    It depends what kind of unlock they combo with it.

    They will probably release the brute force unlock separately.
     
  4. jdong macrumors member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    #5

    No. Ultrasn0w on the iPhone4 simply allows you to dump out the "secrom" of the baseband which contains the hash of the NCK unlock code you need to enter to permanently unlock the unit.

    However, to actually brute force the code based on this information is STILL a pretty insane effort (maybe a few months of computational power with a respectable CPU+GPU), so you can feel free to spend $500 on electricity or whatnot to give it a shot, but it's probably not the best use of your efforts.

    The key point is that without access to the secrom, brute-forcing would be impossible. Ultrasn0w just makes it possible -- whether or not it's practical is a different story.
     
  5. dhlizard macrumors G4

    dhlizard

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    #6
    Glad you cleared this up since early posts were way wrong....
     
  6. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #7
    This isn't correct, is it? I find it hard to imagine that Apple is implementing a brute force technique on its own product to unlock it... that seems absurd.

    OTOH, I do miss the relative permanence of the unlock on the original iPhone. I wish I could even just permanently unlock my 3GS just in case.
     
  7. thelatinist macrumors 603

    thelatinist

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    #8
    No, it's not correct. But the result of the kind of brute force technique they're talking about would be a "factory" unlock.
     
  8. -aggie- macrumors P6

    -aggie-

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    #9
    Do you know any details of what a factory unlock actually is? In other words, do they use software or is some type of hardware change that allows this?
     
  9. thelatinist macrumors 603

    thelatinist

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    Aug 15, 2009
    Location:
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    #10
    The factory unlock is done during activation. AT&T sends an encrypted unlock token which is unique to your device. I understand that with this seczone dump it is theoretically possible to find that token by brute force. You could then spoof the activation server and permanently unlock your phone.
     
  10. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #11
    Right, what you're saying makes sense, thanks.
     
  11. moussekateer macrumors 6502a

    moussekateer

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    May 12, 2009
    #12
    I recall someone a year or so again collecting NCK codes and sec zone dumps from people officially unlocking the phone. He was trying to find the algorithm to generate the NCK codes, but needless to say he didn't get anywhere. As already mentioned it's a huge computational effort. If someone were to find the algorithm though, it would mean every iPhone in the world could be easily unlocked. Only a dream though
     
  12. The General macrumors 601

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    Jul 7, 2006
    #13
    If you brute force your unlock code, which apparently is a possibility on iPhone 4, then your phone will be unlocked forever no matter what.
     
  13. thelatinist macrumors 603

    thelatinist

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    Connecticut, USA
    #14
    MuscleNerd has said that it doesn't appear to be algorithmic. Apple must keep a database of every phone's unlock code on its activation server.
     
  14. moussekateer macrumors 6502a

    moussekateer

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    #15
    Ah I hadn't heard that. There goes the dream!
     
  15. The General macrumors 601

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    #16
    Brute force is still possible, but might take billions of years. ;)
     
  16. -aggie- macrumors P6

    -aggie-

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    #17
    No, you just need to hack into Apple’s server….bwahahahaha.
     
  17. moussekateer macrumors 6502a

    moussekateer

    Joined:
    May 12, 2009
    #18
    But there goes the dream of a tool everyone could use to instantly unlock their phone. Would be funny if someone was brute forcing their code and it was the first attempt, 0000000000000000000001 haha
     
  18. cal6n macrumors 68000

    cal6n

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Location:
    Gloucester, UK
    #19
    Close, but it has very little to do with AT&T or any other carrier. They just tell Apple when one of their customers' iPhones needs unlocking.

    Apple keeps a database of these unlocked iPhone IDs that is checked by iTunes as required. If your phone's on the list, iTunes makes sure it's unlocked.

    When Apple sells an unlocked iPhone, in the UK for example, its ID gets added to the list. However, once an iPhone has been assigned to a carrier, such as AT&T, only that organisation is authorised to add that phone to the database.
     

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